Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I love machinery but it seems like there is always room for improvements. I made this thread to show some picks of some of my favorites and what I’m building or fixing now.

My first entry is a fork I added to my little loader. I have HD grapple bucket but it is heavy, so it cuts my payload significantly. The fork is mounted to my face plate so it can be used solo as a high offset boom (pictured) or it can work with any bucket or forks. The fork can accept any tip you wish to bolt on, I like the spikes on it now. Removal is a two 1” pin job or with one pin change you can tilt it back to a parking position. The original face plate was a Mustang quick connect that I converted to a Std. quick C.  I really like the tree spade on it because the combo is so lite, it makes it easy to handle big diameter oak chunks. This combo ,I call the fork fed beak , works great for picking rocks @mike newman
Currently I’m doing a tear down and overhaul of the big gear head drill press I’m picking off the truck. I’ll get some pictures up of that soon.

319474EA-2C71-4D49-913C-BF1451622014.jpeg

BE4D444A-938D-4EB0-9742-1831422A6CCF.jpeg

671124EC-0156-41B7-A860-497432E94A33.jpeg

  • Like 7
Link to comment
Share on other sites

This machine has a 7” column and weighs about 2000#. The motor is sits on top, 5hp 3 phase. I only paid 400 so I expect to find trouble of some kind. The spindle rotates freely with no play, the detached motor feels smooth and it shifts thru all the gars ok.  Even after payment the seller wasn’t ready to say why he was dumping it.

I moved it in the shop and picked a spot where there would be room for the motor to set up top.I have a 9 foot ceiling in the basement shop but I will need more room to get the motor up. I built this between the joist max pic point bracket out of scrap metal.

AE54CDAB-1AFE-4A14-B17D-D5C42F34BBF1.jpeg

3CAA9CD5-87C5-466D-BE28-31AE02CE5E90.jpeg

  • Like 6
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've got a smaller gear head drill press picked up in a similar deal but it has more problems, after using one at work for decades definitely worth a bit of investigation and repair, I think both the one at work and mine are both Scandinavian manufacture

Looks like your gussets on the tree spade double up as steps to climb in and out

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yours might be an Arboga from Sweden?   This is an old Summit. It is in pieces now and laid out all over the shop (neatly). It was left out in the rain is the only problem I’ve come across. I got all 12 bearings ordered for just over $200. A bunch of cleaning now. By the way it came with an Erickson quick change in the spindle. That was probably $500 new.

Most of the disassembly went smooth. I did have a stubborn shaft that needed a puller on it. You gotta get creative on castings, they’ll crack at the snap of a hammer.

0003A942-A06F-4D3A-A73D-CE4D58C04E0A.jpeg

B2BA1662-1F13-49CB-BE2C-56613A14C425.jpeg

A65E44DA-9766-4F1E-8844-503E80904CFA.jpeg

3732D10E-32DD-4A94-BDF1-20BC0EECE505.jpeg

3A4BF7E2-570E-4928-A4DA-24973FEBE327.jpeg

  • Like 8
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dave:  Try some Evaporust on the gears and shafts.  If fully submerged it won't hurt machined surfaces or non ferrous metals.  Just degrease it good before putting the parts in it and it will last through the whole project.

Cool project!!

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dave:  While you have it apart can you toke the castings to an automotive machine shop and have them washed in their engine machine?  They would look like new!  You would have to recoat the interior with Glyptol, but it would be awesome!  (Like how I can spend your money for you!  LOL!)

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

21 hours ago, Gearclash said:

Summit is usually nothing more than a badge on some machine tool builder’s product. I have an older Summit 14x40 lathe; capable machine but not the highest quality build. 

Summit has been manufactured by many companies through the years, some really cheap crap and some solid producers. This machine was a production drill at Havens C clamp Company. A guy had drums of screws and un-drilled frames from a going out of business I assume. I have bought dozens of machine tools and ran several hundred so I can pretty much judge the bones without a deep dive.

A place I worked bought a brand new Summit lathe in 1991, a 24 X 120 or so. It had a huge hole for the size and that was what the Manager was looking for, with blinders on apparently . It was breaking from the start. You know the plastic injection thing auto makers were/are using for snap rings on u joints. This lathe used a plastic injected nut on the feed engagement. Stripped out of the gate and a poor arrangement to repair. You could stick a 3 or 4” cylinder rod through the head but cutting it sucked.

Happy turning 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 3/29/2023 at 7:25 AM, hardtail said:

Looking at the ground almost looks like a Harley was parked there surely not the Honda 😁

.......being that last   m/  bike   I ''rode'' was a  "" Francis Barnett  ""   of unknown age...and little power ..but after I went arse over kite into   a small  , but swampy gully...  and rearranged several relevants parts of the m/bike......rendering it useless at that point...(and that was fifty years ago..)..I really am in no position to comment on Daves    m/bike...other than saying after   a trip around part of his interesting work shop.....seeing a   ''honda''  coming into an otherwise interesting synopsis on various machine tools etc......brought me back to the harsh realities of this world......:rolleyes:

Mike

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 3/28/2023 at 1:25 PM, hardtail said:

Looking at the ground almost looks like a Harley was parked there surely not the Honda 😁

A little sloppy oil changing 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

So I want to show the tire spoons I made with a cold forming in a 20 ton press. I find the short notch is ideal for tube type, it keeps you from getting too deep and the dreaded tube pinch. I like the Kant Twist clamps for the bead breaking on bike tires. You can drive them with a cheap socket with a groove ground in for the tee handle. I balance my bike tires with lead and  clear Gorilla tape heat shrink ed over it to keep it in place.

I threw in a picture of a bunch of Dudes on vacation. 

991AE4B2-1430-4713-A976-98FEC141210D.jpeg

2C364F28-417C-4BFC-A01C-6E692E65040E.jpeg

2DB56AC0-4A6C-40C2-9E45-728AEA836F35.jpeg

05D9869E-E3CB-4189-859C-ADDD6945D6D8.jpeg

33AC9EEB-DD52-48D9-9D7B-02F3EC7F5593.jpeg

21F142FA-96DD-44DC-85EF-2B01C5EAD2A4.jpeg

5220F074-AD8C-452B-8F82-EC6817AEC4E0.jpeg

  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I most enjoy using the things we have on hand often unused to make something I have wanted but to cheep to buy.

I have plenty of Channel locks around but not that cool Parrot Head. The divit on the right is the Parrot the left was before surgery and the middle divit is from a pair of 12” Knipex Cobras. I used them on the disassembly of a drill press on some Allen heads that barely stuck up above the surface. The hex key holes were badly rusted. The Parrot broke them loose easily.

Drill Press parts are soaking in oil. Spring has changed my direction a bit for now.

84973F78-33A3-46F1-8AB7-473FC11F05DF.jpeg

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Bending is a good way to make many things and leave a clean factory look to your creations. Here is a quick tip for maintaining a flat next to your radiuses. This is 1/2 “ CRSteel with a 1/2” radius.

I also want to share a great source for credible information on metals, their composition, strength, weld ability and the critical temperatures for heat treatment. The Jorgensen Stock List is the best source around. These were given out to customers in the deep past, not so easy to get new unless you buy tons, but I would think they are out there used. I have an older from the 60’s with pricing in it. Unbelievable!  I snapped a page that @Sledgehammer might like , he was recently working with a piece of this steel. Spring seems to be dragging me every direction at once, keeps me young?

IMG_0737.jpeg

IMG_0736.jpeg

IMG_0718.jpeg

IMG_0719.jpeg

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Thanks for the encouragement Mike. Too much play lately. Buddies and I went to Arkansas last weekend riding off road around White Rock Mt., so a bunch of cleaning and some fixing this week. I burned my hand a bit on my coffee pot on the last morning and had to set out the last ride to avoid deskining my palm. First thing in my cross hairs…coffee pot. I put a latch on the lid while I was at it, all SS hardware and a new handle of sufficient size and shape to fit my paw. I added my AR transportation. I made that rear deck in 1995 for a back porch on my pick up truck when I had a slide in camper on it. We carried a little motor bike on it for emergencies and kid fun. I repurposed it for the haul to AR.       the simple things 

Dave

IMG_0754.jpeg

IMG_0755.jpeg

IMG_0756.jpeg

IMG_0743.jpeg

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

@just Dave I see you are in the Kansas City area.  I bought a Cincinnati Planer not so far away from you.  It was in Hiawatha KS.  Spent about 4 day down there dismantling the planer so we could move it.  It was a 3x3x12 enclosed side planer.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

@GearclashI have been through Hiawatha many times. Pre I29 that was the way to Falls City where my father is from. What are you going to do with the planer, do you have a particular job in mind for it? The last one I saw in production was pealing fork lift masts out of T1.  I ran one some years ago cutting  aluminum track for welding robots. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is little Brown & Sharp surface grinder, that I finally let go of. It was a salvage machine from the time I got it from an old boss. I savaged the magnetic chuck to use with my cutter grinder and the motor w/ starter.to use on an old 24” Cincinnati camel back drill press.  The rest was rusty to the point of no return so sadly I scraped her. #1300 on the Ranger hearse  for the the slow short procession. I saved many machines from scrap when I was younger and have put several to work for me but the bitter reality is, I can not save them all. The sky hailed the departure.

IMG_0244.jpeg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, just Dave said:

What are you going to do with the planer, do you have a particular job in mind for it?

I was looking for a way to mill big truck engine blocks to true up the head deck.  Looked at horizontal boring mills extensively; I would have preferred to go that way but anything big enough for that particular job had quite an asking price on it.  A purpose specific machine like what Rottler builds would have been even worse $$$$$$.  This planer has more than enough work envelope, plus it has a mechanical DC motor powered platen drive so it should be pretty easy to slow down to milling speeds, and yet retain the ability to speed it up for planer work.  I do need to find a milling head that I like.  

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You will likely need to use some gear reduction even with the DC motor.  I’ve had a Bridgeport head on a planer before but the feed rate was a problem.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Unfortunately, your content contains terms that we do not allow. Please edit your content to remove the highlighted words below.
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...