Old Binder Guy

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  1. Old Binder Guy

    150 H.P. CASE 'Road Locomotive'

    KWRB, My dad at age 11 (1910), harvest time, he was told he was "water boy" for the threshing outfit. Neighbor Chris Odenwald used his 20 hp Aultman Taylor steam engine and they used grandpa Yaeger's Aultman Taylor threshing machine and crew. Dad was one of 16 kids. Dad cherished this photograph of his first day on the crew and penciled a small x by his head, left of the smokestack. Before the day was over, he was running the steam engine by himself. Chris designated another of the boys as water boy. Whether a boy or a man, the water was hand pumped out of a spring or stream. Some farms had a big stock tank fed by a windmill they drew water from. When the Yaeger brothers got serious about farming their spread with steam, they wound up with with a team of horses pulled water wagon that stood by. The team could also pull coal wagons to the engine. It was backup. They had a Model TT Ford truck with a mounted water tank. It was faster than the horses. (But the horses stood by, in case the Model TT quit running for some reason.) They had another Model T Ford car they could pull around with a hitch. Behind the engine was a 3" X 2-1/2" centrifugal pump and hoses that pumped water into the water wagon from their big spring. These took the jobs away from kids and gave them to young men. But they had distances to travel and water HAS to be there when needed. My dad was always engineer, having gotten his Montana Traction License at age 12 in 1911. He fully understood the need for water for the engine. Like my dad, I always understood the need for water and always keep an alternate plan in the back of my mind to not get in a pickle, without water. (As devastating explosions are a possibility with a steam engine, I've never been scared of them. The same reason you don't play with matches in a fireworks factory.) While there is a Case hand pump on our Case water tank wagon, it is just for looks. We have electricity and are set up to pump out of the creek with a gasoline engine pump if ever needed. You'll notice our water tank wagon is hitched to an IH Farmall M. It is an IH Tractor on a Montana Farm. Gary🙂 PS: Art, steam whistles use high pressure with high (boiler) capacity, but not high volume, where the steam escapes through a tiny crack in a steam whistle. It'd take lots of blowing to lower the boiler's pressure any noticable amount. GY
  2. Old Binder Guy

    150 H.P. CASE 'Road Locomotive'

    KWRB, A factor of two was 2 times the maximum operating pressure. And a factor of 1.5 was one and one half times the maximum pressure. At least "at our house." I cringe when pumping up a boiler. I've never ever heard a "whump" coming from deep inside, and hope I never do. None of the other steam traction engines never condensed. It went into the atmosphere. Often 5 eight barrel water tanks (or more) were gone through per day, plowing. When we used to plow with the 40 hp Peerless Z-3 double simple engine at Belgrade, Montana, we'd turn on a one inch injector after the plowing round was started. We had two water tanks holding 350 gallons each. When we finished the round (about a mile), those tanks were nearly empty. Sometimes we had to turn on a second 1" injector. That all went into the atmosphere. Gary😉
  3. Old Binder Guy

    150 H.P. CASE 'Road Locomotive'

    Anson, I just wanted you to know that even though maximum torque is derived at -0- "zero" RPMs, nothing breaks when it stalls at zero. If it can't start zero, it needs more pressure. If it's at maximum operating pressure and still is stalled, forget it. You need to trade for a bigger engine! I stalled (well, the late Carl Tuttle was at the helm), and I was down below firing for him, pulling the 20-bottom plow with my late steam buddy Austin Monk's 40 hp Peerless at Belgrade, Montana. I always tried keep that engine right on 150 psi. At 148 psi, you might feel it lugging too much, trying to stall. Well this round with Carl, I let it get to 148, and it did stall. Naturally, the throttle was wide opened until I shut it, and it couldn't pull itself out of the predicament. It doesn't take much to gain back 2 psi. When I got it on 150, we took off again. When I closed the throttle after stalling, the engine "relaxed" with the gearing pressure backed off. At 150, I pulled the throttle opened, and we were plowing again. Anson, Your question about dwindling pressure in the cylinder. If you shut the throttle, that is the case. But as long as the throttle is opened, that current boiler pressure is going to stay static in the cylinders, unless you're planning to do this for an extended period, when the fire is gone out engine is going to cool. But on the spot, when using the engine, as long as the throttle is opened, that's the pressure in the cylinders. I've never operated a steam locomotive under load. Just empty. When I was a boy, during August harvest, it was hot out during the days making our house hot upstairs at night. Naturally every window in the house was opened to screens. I was on the end of the house that faced Glengarry where my one room school and the Montana Elevator was. Mr. Olson would fill grain cars during the days of harvest and along about 10:PM to 12: midnight, the Milwaukee locomotives would saunter into Glengarry, drop the caboose, pull ahead and turn the switch, then back in and hook onto the day's harvest boxcars. When they'd pull out of the siding, it was so interesting and fun for this boy to listen to the engineer's slowly pulling out of the siding, then spinning their tires. That scraping sound gave me chill bumps! Then they'd close the throttle and start again. Sometimes they'd spin out two or three times, before getting out, the switch turned, and backed into the caboose again. Then often they would spin getting started out again on the main line. This was Milwaukee engine #8148 at harvest time, picking up cars at Joan, Montana. We farmed on both sides of the tracks here. Glengarry was about 3.5 miles ahead of this locomotive. Gary😉
  4. Old Binder Guy

    150 H.P. CASE 'Road Locomotive'

    KWRB, Steam boilers didn't explode from normal over pressure. As Randy Hall stated, their pop or safety valves are set to a limit the boiler's inspector allows, on in the case of a new boiler, set to the designed maximum operating pressure by the company building it. The common cause of a steam boiler explosion was "low water." I'll add this JI Case locomotive style steam boiler which will hopefully help understand how low water could happen, and cause a catastrophic event. The cut above shows the "lined" sections that is water. Notice there is water around all sides AND the top of the fire box. Those stay bolts holding the firebox spaced to the outer wrapper sheet is how it gets it's strength, to hold that hot, important piece in place. That upper plate is called the "Crown Sheet." Since this cut is of a "straw burner," it has different grates, and it has the addition of the fire brick shield, keeping the fire below, and the straw from collecting as ash on the tubes. Other than this, it is the same boiler as the wood or coal burner. Now back to the crown sheet. Notice it has water atop it. There is lots of heat transfer done there. The boiler tubes, the fire and heat go through gather more heat for the water there. This is an ideal situation catalog cut. First of all, the exhaust of the steam motor (engine proper) creates a draft, pulling the fire through from the firebox, through the tubes and out the smokestack. (That locomotive above is a classic example of exhaust steam creating a draft. You can hear each forward and rearward motion of each piston. The locomotive has four exhausts per revolution. The 150 Case, or any single cylinder engine, only has two exhausts per revolution.) Now picture the engine going up a hill. The water flows to the back head sheet and off of the front of the boiler barrell tubes. No problem. But when heading back down the hill the water flows to the front of the boiler barrel. But that uncovers the crown sheet of water. Short intervals of that don't matter. If descending a hill is necessary, you can close the draft door, open the rear firebox door, and open the front door. This removes the draft drawing the fire through the tubes. And you should carry your water high in the gauge glass before doing it. You're pretty much using already created, stored steam pressure in this descent. Failure to prevent the exhaust draw of the fire through the tubes, will overheat the crownsheet where bare of water. First it should melt and blow out the soft, or fusible plug. (Any engineer blowing one, probably should go back to steam school? They're purported to remediate some engineer ignorance.) They are a brass plug filled with a tin antimony, lead like substance intended to melt out, quenching the fire with overpowering steam vapor. Sadly, many plugs aren't checked frequently, and a scale buildup atop the substance will prevent its melting, making it as effective as a pipe plug in the hole. I've always operated an engine as though there were no fusible plug installed. (Kind of like when your wife says, after a shopping trip, "Oh, that red light on the dash that says OIL, is stuck on, and I didn't know what to squirt oil on.") Okay, the engine is headed downward, the water is off of the rear half, or all, of the crownsheet. There is scale on the fusible plug. Early on, after this, many old engines crown sheets got "Pillowed." Between each stay bolt, they "cupped" outward, from the heated boiler plate and the steam pressure. Some engines missed blowing up, at this point. But when these pillows get red hot, it allows the heat expansion and softened metal to strip the sheeting away from the threaded, riveted end, staybolts. At that very millisecond, when it starts to blow, it's far too to turn and kiss your fanny goodbye. Once that superheated steam starts to escape, it tears those stay bolts away in zipper fashion. That blows the firebox, or the rear portions out of the boiler and lifts the back end off of the ground with the thrust of a rocket taking off at Cape Canaveral. This picture is of a 15 hp Case steam engine, showing the firebox ripped loose, and it catapulted up and came down on its side. The steerable tender behind it likely kept it from doing more distance? The crown sheet is completely blown away in this photo exposing the "wagon top" stay bolts. This was a GNRY steam locomotive at Wolf Point Montana that exploded in 1924. The train crew of four stopped at the station and walked up town to eat. When they came back, the fireman checked the water glass and there was no water in it. If I'd been in charge of that train and locomotive, I'd have had the crew spend the afternoon waiting for the fire to subside in the firebox. Instead, the fireman turned on the injector to add water. Immediately, the crown sheet blew and notice it "catapulted" the boiler off of the frame of the engine and flipped it nearly squarely ahead of the frame. Three of the crew were killed. I'm guessing a brakeman or conductor was headed back to the caboose? Reeves engines and other brands used a "water bottom" boiler. In other words, the rear "wagon top" outer wrapper of the firebox, also wrapped underneath the firebox and their ends were riveted together. This was purportedly a stronger design. It was also supposed to capture more wasted heat. However, I've heard instances where these engine's fireboxes tended to freeze up, when being fired in sawmills in winter!😮 This is an example of a Reeves like our son has, that blew up in Nebraska years ago. It probably couldn't get rid of its flash steam out the bottom, so it appears to have blown the rear head sheet, or portions of it, out of the firebox. Notice the Reeves threshing machine ahead of it. This explosion killed the thresherman, atop the threshing machine. When a crown sheet blows, the easiest part of the engine to become a projectile is the front smokebox door, or the pieces of shrapnel it makes instantly. I'm reluctant to mention the 32 hp (110 hp) Case that blew up July 29th, 2001 at Medina, Ohio. There are differing opinions about the boiler, which came from a late friend of mine, about 125 miles from me. I just wanted to mention the extreme force in which that popular velocity of pent up steam makes in an explosion, regarding that 1 gallon of water expanding 1600+ times after turning to steam. This explosion was caught on law enforcement video dash cam. It's estimated that 22 ton engine's rear end blew 17 feet into the air. (A mathematician on SmokStak.com estimated the force expended when this engine blew, would have blown a 5" steel ball or shot, to the moon. I'm not smart enough to check his work.) The engine was having problems with its injectors and couldn't get them to add water into the boiler. They arrived at the Medina fairgrounds frustrated. They'd travelled on blacktop, and law enforcement pulled them over in the fairgrounds to discuss this no, no. The engine set there heating the crown sheet. I don't know if they finally got an injector to work, or whether they were going to move the engine out of the road? Regardless, the lawman should have been told, we're going to back this engine into a ditch, and this would have never happened. I believe it took 4 or 5 lives and a lot of people were hit with shrapnel and scalded. I've said more than I wanted to, but it is no secret that it happened, and I tried to keep my personal opinions to myself. It was low water that caused it. The engine, before, below. It was before it was sold to the owner above. KWRB, I'm not real keen on safety factors, but Montana boiler inspectors used to (in the heyday of steam farming) use a safety factor of 2. They'd hydro a boiler to twice its operating pressure. That was continued into the hobby era too. Until they found they were destroying boilers that could have still been operated at a reduced pressure at a steam show. Just for giggles, this is our steam engine hydro pump, for pumping up boilers for a "stress test." We only do 1.5 factor when pumping up our boilers. Condensing: The IHC, Baker and Bryan "Steam tractors" were all condensing tractors. Steam was pretty much all in and all done when they came along. AD Baker had built steam traction engines all through the steam era. He was likely more determined and fascinated than others, for trying condensing engines? One difficulty of condensing steam (I know Stanley, Locomobile, White and probably other steam car builders did it, out of necessity) is that steam cylinder oil is emitted into the main steam line to the motor (engine proper) to lubricate the cylinder, piston and slide valves. Steam oil, a derivative using beef tallow, was made to mix with the water and not separate during lubrication. It became difficult to "un mix" the oil after usage and condensing. I know it didn't work well in the steam tractors. Friend, Jerred Ruble owns this one of two prototypes AD Baker made. As fascinating of an engine as it is, it wasn't really a success commercially and still isn't. But it is fascinating at his shows. The AD Baker condensing engine: International Harvester built two steam tractors but there wasn't likely much backing from the higher ups, when they were able to build solid gas tractors and could likely see the sun setting on the steam age. Volumes of water and fuel, plus winter freezing and chance of exploding, put the kibosh on lots of steam usage, I'd bet? These two tractors, rather than going into a museum were scrapped, so I was told. That's a sad page of history. Last, but not least, is the Bryan steam tractor. There were several of these steam tractors built and sold. I know there are still at least two at shows. I photographed this one at Forest City, Iowa in 2010. It was powering a sawmill and doing a great job of it. And just to give you and idea of the pressures these steam tractors used, I am posting this photo of a Bryan steam gauge. An engine is usually operated "mid-gauge" or 500 psi on the Bryan. IHC and Baker operated at high pressures too. I think many Stanley steam cars operate at 600 psi? Gary😉
  5. Old Binder Guy

    150 H.P. CASE 'Road Locomotive'

    You're extremely correct, mader656. Zero RPMS, starting a load, is the maximum torque a steam engine can put out at the boiler pressure it is carrying. Gary😉
  6. Old Binder Guy

    150 H.P. CASE 'Road Locomotive'

    Troy, While I have loved all steam, most all of my life, growing up inside a horseshoe loop on the Milwaukee Railroad, watching those steam locomotives pass by, the engineers whistling at us kids there; I can't answer your question. While the modern diesel electric locomotives are rated in horsepower, steam locomotives were rated by tractive effort. The amount of weight on the driver wheels, and the amount of load it can start (hopefully without spinning out) is part of determining that? It rates a steam locomotive as to the size of train it can pull from a dead stop, to motating down the rails! I'm sure a person could google it and find a cross reference? And all locomotives were built for a specific purpose. Ones with tall driver wheels were normally for fast passenger service. Around Marias Pass, on the old GNRY, the big low wheel articulated engines were "geared" (no gears) to pulling heavy loads up steep grades. Of course there were stations near the midsection of the Rockies that had standby locomotives to cut in to help get the loads over the top. I'm telling more than I really know, as I never worked with steam locomotives on the railroad. I knew a lot of the old steam locomotive engineers and coffee'd with them morning and afternoon, when I worked for Whitefish Schools. 30 years ago, there were a multitude of those old steam boys retired. I'm blessed to have gotten to know them. I did get to reverse the Johnson bar on a Milwaukee steam locomotive, open the throttle with the engineer's help, back down the tracks a couple blocks. Close the throttle, reverse the Johnson bar to forward motion and open the throttle with the engineer's help as a 7th grader. Our one room school at Glengarry, Montana had a visitation day in Lewistown yearly, visiting the police, sheriff, fire, radio stations, courthouse, Daily News, flour mill, bakery and Milwaukee roundhouse. Thankfully, I was the "big kid" and we had lots of girls in school. The engineer had no problems getting me to volunteer! A lifetime memory for this old kid. Gary😉
  7. Old Binder Guy

    IH Tractors on Montana Farm

    http://anderson-industries.com/150-case-part-1-realizing-the-dream/ http://anderson-industries.com/150-case-part-2-building-a-giant/ I think this will post, showing the building of Kory Anderson's 150 hp Case from dream to steam! What an accomplishment for a 31 year old man. He should have decades to enjoy showing this engine! There are several other steam engines at this show. From the middle of the second photo, to the end, are all Case engines. The Brand X engines are on this closer half.The 150 wasn't in the lineup, yet. Gary😉
  8. Old Binder Guy

    IH Tractors on Montana Farm

    Anson, Those two good lookin' girls with Booger Bear... It's strange how he has the concept down at his age and you're standing there with that whustle, wondering how it could ever bring babes to you? Booger Bear has my tactics down. I don't know what to tell you Anson? Maybe paint up the Regular and take it to shows with a PTO compressor on the back to toot your whustle? I have no idea where that picture was taken of the horsepower threshing. I think it is a grand photo of that type of threshing that preceded steam threshing, pretty much. I have this other picture of a horsepower taken near Highwood, Montana, I like too. The little boy being little boy being held by Grandpa Mehmke at right is young Walter, who collected and established the Mehmke Steam Museum, between Belt and Great Falls, Montana. This would be close to 1900, as Walter was born in 1898, a year before my dad. Now just when I figured you'd buried the hatchet and that darn choo choo cap, I have to put this photo on of me at Andover, South Dakota. I'm sitting atop Kory Anderson's 150 hp Case visiting with (younger than me) old engineer, Jack Beamish. Please note my cap, as I'm trying to be on neutral ground with so many thousand steam guys present. I have to admit, Anson... I sure fooled a bunch of them. They KNOW I always wear a polka dot cap when steaming. Well this time I wore an authentic cap for operating this engine. People would find son Mike, in his polkadot cap, and ask him if he was related to me? He'd say yes, and they'd have to hunt more. This photo shows the two guys who developed the 150 hp Case and brought it to fruition. Notice THEIR caps. I wanted to be in style. The gentlemen were slightly height challenged. Mike and I are too. I'm a whole 5' 10-1/2" and Mike is 5' 10." We had to have our picture taken with the new 150 Case. It seems like forever since I've posted a photo of IH Tractors on a Montana Farm? Can I just repost this one again? It was last year. Or I can post this IH Tractor, but it's not on a Montana Farm. It's in a Montana Agricultural Museum at Fort Benton, the world's innermost port. Gary😉
  9. Old Binder Guy

    IH Tractors on Montana Farm

    I took a lot of video of Kory Anderson parading and plowing with his 150 hp Case. I'm not set up to put video on youtube. So I grabbed this snippet of someone else's on SmokStak. It is when they first presented the engine to the public at 3:PM on September 7th. Gary😉
  10. Old Binder Guy

    IH Tractors on Montana Farm

    Anson, I went over and did my best with some of those questions on the 150 hp Case thread. Now, while I was overdosed on steam at Andover, I had a root canal with calcific metamorphisis just last Thursday. And I got the flu or something very close to it when I got home. I was sick as a sick dog for two days. Now, I know this is too darn much information. But to make it so I could sleep for two nights, I was taking some of my Oxycodone from my palate tumor of a couple months ago. That stuff sure is constipating... Nuff said. Now about trolling with steam engines and them being babe magnets, I don't know what to do to help you out, buddy? Maybe finish your whustle and take it to a steam show then blow the heck out of it? Gary😉
  11. Old Binder Guy

    150 H.P. CASE 'Road Locomotive'

    Randy Hall, I used to play on 32 hp Reeves cross compound Canadian Special #6269 starting in 1945. I remember Dad setting me up on it. Dad loved steam engines and when I was old enough (11) he made a way for his sons to learn steam. Well, I did, but my brother could care less. They plowed with that 32 hp Reeves through 1938. They once plowed a measured 100 acres in one day in the early 1920's on contract. Dad often remarked, "Not too bad for the horse and buggy days." Reeves also changed from nominal to brake horsepower about the time they came out with the Canadian Special engines in 1910. Strangely, their customers didn't change. This 32-120 hp Reeves was always "a 32 hp" to Dad. And remember "Nominal HP" was close to what that many work horses would pull. Figure two horses per plow bottom. And that intercepting valve or "magic lever" increased its horsepower (it's been debated for over a century) from 150% to 200%. I've been on a 32 hp Reeves simpled and it will raise the hair on the back of your neck when the governor kicks in! I thought we were going to take off flying. But, they couldn't maintain boiler pressure for a long distance under load. So it was a tool to get you started out on a load, or to get yourself out of a "sticky situation." (Or if it couldn't get you out of a sticky situation, it could still get you in deeper in that situation!) JI Case changed from nominal horsepower to brake horsepower ratings on their steam engines in 1910. The 150 hp Case started out as a Road Locomotive. There are some who say (and most of them were at Andover) it was a "40 hp" engine. Others swear it was a "50 hp" nominal hp engine. I'm not going to get my nose bloodied of this scuffle. The brake horsepower ratings closely parallel the formula of the grate and heating surface factors. Originally nominal horsepower ratings of early (pre-1900 engines) were a guessing game. If a steam engine was put on this threshing machine, turned by 12 horses, and it could power it sufficiently, it would be termed a "12 horsepower" engine. That was the beginning of nominal horsepower. And for a "nominal figure" I'll explain horsepower more fully! I have to say that 150 hp Case is one impressive engine to watch! Kory did fix what was wrong with the originals, that caused their demise. Misalignments, poor bearings (which misalignments take advantage of) were a big problem. Another problem Kory corrected was the height placement of the intermediate gear. The original was a few inches lower and the master gear on the crankshaft was trying to 'spit out' that gear in its proximity to the differential gear. Kory moved the gear up that little distance so it was more "above" the center line between the master pinion and the differential gear. The later 32 hp, which became the 110 hp Case, that problem was corrected with a cross shaft on the intermediate gear and bearings on both sides. Since the 32 hp was the workable engine, and ready to market in the midst of the problems with the two 150 hp engines having problems in Kansas, it was decided to trash can the 150 hp and promote the 32 hp. The 32-110 Case was probably the most successful plowing engine ever devised. And it's big enough! The 150 was too big for most applications. But, I'm tickled pink Kory was able to re-create the immortal 150 hp Case. It needs to be remembered and it will be through our lifetimes. And since it is a restoration, with a piece of the original 150 hp Case, #14,666, it can live not being a recreation! Gary😉 PS: Anson, I'm sorry for my tardiness. Is a root canal with calcific metamorphosis a good enough excuse for that absence?
  12. Old Binder Guy

    150 H.P. CASE 'Road Locomotive'

    The 150 hp Case "#14,666" pulling 24-bottoms of John Deere Plow. Me and Colin Beamish visiting aboard 14666. His dad, Jack, was up there as well. Gary🙂
  13. Old Binder Guy

    IH Tractors on Montana Farm

    Thank you so much for the photos, Emma. I didn't have one of me sitting on the 150 hp Case, visiting with Jack Beamish for nearly an hour. And, the one of the Ladies of Steam. The girls operated that 65 hp Case themselves plowing and wouldn't let any of the guys help them. They're famous at Rollag, Minnesota's show. At the Saturday night banquet, Mike had to go to the outhouse as the meeting was over. Nicole Karen and Jennifer Clara came over to me to introduce themselves to me, as I'd promoted a lot of ladies to their Facebook site. Nicole's mother had the camera, as mine wouldn't function at this moment. She took this photo of me with my arms around the girls! Mike walked in and couldn't believe his eyes. Paw was hugging two blondes and he must have been eating his heart out! Not only are they fully capable steam girls, they know the inside of a firebox, cleaning flues, oiling & greasing, the whole works. Just like Emma does. Nicole is a Doctor too! Nicole on Jim Briden's 40 hp undermounted Avery. Jennifer on Jim Briden's 40 hp undermounted Avery. This first picture is a painting! Steam engines are babe magnets, I guess? Gary😀
  14. Old Binder Guy

    IH Tractors on Montana Farm

    I sure did, Todd!
  15. Old Binder Guy

    IH Tractors on Montana Farm

    Anson, They said it weighed 28 tons dry and 34 tons ready to work with water filled and coal. It was intended for road work pulling freight wagons, but it became a trial for farming and plowing. It originally didn't work out, due to design flaws. The new 32 hp, or later 110 hp, was ready to market and they went with it. Mainly the "loosy goosy" intermediate gear was too low and the gearing was trying to "spit it out." The new 32 used a cross shaft in bearings, curing that problem. I did well on the trip. So glad I went. Gary