Dave Shepard

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About Dave Shepard

  • Rank
    Advanced Member

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Alford, MA
  • Interests
    Timber framing
    Blacksmithing
    Sawmills

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1,455 profile views
  1. Dave Shepard

    Winter wood supply.

    You can get coal here, it's actually a good deal $/btu, if you have a stove or boiler for it. A friend bought 20 tons from Tractor Supply a couple years ago.
  2. Dave Shepard

    Winter wood supply.

    My Central 6048 has no fan and will burn almost anything once you've got a bed of coals. It doesn't need any more draft, I'd be worried about chunks going up the chimney if it had a forced draft.
  3. Dave Shepard

    Winter wood supply.

    This is the reality of owb usage around here. Cut a cord every weekend off the junk pile. I split so I can get a decent load in the boiler. I'm cutting a lot of 18" to 42" diameter ash and hard maple. I have to rip in half, or quarters, just to get it on the splitter. If it's only 10-12", I might leave it round, but it takes up too much room.
  4. Dave Shepard

    Winter wood supply.

    Doing some the easy way. eta: S Series F2274, 400 Cummins, 8LL, 46k rears, and 20k front.
  5. Dave Shepard

    traffic jam

    Pass with care, indeed!
  6. Dave Shepard

    Testing my moxie

    I wanted to go to SUNY Cobleskill. My guidance councilor said I didn't need to go to college, I was just going to be a farmer. I said you went to college, and you just became a guidance councilor. End of conversation.
  7. Dave Shepard

    Welding rod question

    My father dragged home an open can of 1/4" 12018 "Jetrod" or "Jetrode", something like that. Never got used. Not surprisingly.
  8. Dave Shepard

    Where will it end. LOL

    Even has a coat hook and lunchbox holder. You could just get serious and get an L2350.
  9. Dave Shepard

    Anyone ever move a barn

    Documentation is very important. Make a neat sketch of every bent or assembly, and be sure to note which way you are looking. For example "Bent II looking North". Then put a number tag on each part. Just a number, you don't want any other confusing info on there. The best numbers are tree inventory numbers from Ben Meadows, Forestry Suppliers, and others. They are stamped in aluminum, and have a hole for a screw. Put a number on every part, and draw every part on your sketches. It is a big project, but can be very rewarding. Not to mention you will be saving a piece of history.
  10. Dave Shepard

    $148m home

    Looked like a nice spread of calf-tels, then I zoomed in and saw they were umbrellas.
  11. Dave Shepard

    I lost my hammer 😢

    Those Estwings last forever, but are the worst thing for your joints. Orthopedic doctors say to use only wooden handles. I have an $18 Fatmax framer. I haven't been able to break it yet.
  12. Dave Shepard

    New joke

    Even if there is only one person on the planet, there will be two Dunkin Donuts stores.
  13. Dave Shepard

    life in our corner

    IFS, six bolt wheels, light frame. Probably a Toyota.
  14. Dave Shepard

    Slow board?

    I think most websites have ups and downs. For the first time ever, I have a connection that is faster than most websites. My cell phone over wifi. Tethered to a laptop I've seen 952 down/953 up.
  15. Dave Shepard

    The Learning Channel

    My friend works with 95% marble. Granite requires a different diamond blade makeup. Marble is allergic to blasting, it will be full of cracks. That particular block was cut with a steam channeller in the '20's, and was left on a rail siding in '29, the stock market crash having put them out of business. This channeller has an electric motor. Once you had a flat bench in the quarry, you would channel down about five feet in a grid to create the blocks. The first few blocks would be snapped loose with wedges, bars or whatever way possible. Once you had access to the bottom of the blocks, you drill horizontally under them and drive wedges under to break them loose. When you see an old block with 2-3" holes drilled closely all across the face, that's probably what was happening. Smaller holes spaced 6"-12" apart is from feathers and and wedges.