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INTERNATIONAL 1466

Scary tractor rides

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Sitting here having coffee after morning chores and trying to build up my courage to go back out into a blizzard was telling stories with the boys. Got going on crazy things that have happened with farming over the years. Any of you have scary tractor ride stories? One of mine was years ago, I was in high school yet and we had to haul some corn to town. It was in the winter and there was ice on the roads behind the groves of the farm places other wise they were clear. So Dad and I got the 826 and two 375 Killbrothers wagons out and went to one of the other farm sites to load corn. We had eight sets of rear wheel weights on the 826 to help with traction on the snow and ice. Got to the other place and loaded the wagons no problem and then I headed to the elevator. All good, but took a road that we had not been on lately which was a big mistake. Had a fair size hill on this road with a farm place on the south side, so you guessed it, ice pack on the road right at the top of the hill. Well I had the 826 cooking as fast as the ole girl would go up the hill. It was going pretty well wasn`t even spinning on the ice much as there was a little gravel, until I started to run out of motor and had to pull the ta. As soon as I pulled the ta and my traction broke loose and I commenced to spinning like crazy! I knew I was not going to be able to hold it on the ice with the brakes, so I pushed in the clutch shifted into 2nd and hoped a lot. I knew my only hope of saving this ride backwards down the hill with two loads of corn was one small bare patch of gravel I had crossed a few feet behind me. So somewhat in a panic yet thinking quick enough to have a plan, I am sliding backwards clutch depressed and brakes mashed on. I am looking backwards for the bare patch of gravel intending to rip the throttle open and dump the clutch when the back wheels hit the gravel. That is exactly what I did and to my amazement I stopped and could then hold it all with the bakes. By this time the back wagon was jackknifed with the right rear wheel just off the edge of the road. Didn`t spill a kernel of corn! If I hadn`t had gloves on I am pretty sure my fingerprints would still be on the steering wheel of the 826. Needless to say then I got to walk home to get Dad and another tractor to pull me up the hill. It was a scary ride for a young farmer and a good lesson learned way back then. Long story I know, but just thought I would share on this blizzardy morning.

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Spooky,, Mine was with Dads Allis Chalmers D-19 and a Badger 1800 gallon manure tank. I was 17, hauling manure on the road with a full load. Road gear and one of the right rear wheel bearings on the tank goes out. The wheel comes off part way and hangs sideways on the axle. That pulls the tank sideways into the ditch, the tank rolls partway over onto its side, pulling the tractor with it. When everything stopped the Allis right rear wheel was 3 feet off the road, the right front tractor wheel is one foot off and I am still in the seat. VERY shocked on how fast that had happened!!!!!

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When I was younger I had an issue with our John Deere 50. I was going down the dirt road to our other fields that didn't have any houses on it at the time so it was narrow. A few feet on each side of the 50 and not much wider than the hay rake I was pulling. I was in road gear and steered the front tires a little bit around a rut and the power steering locked up and put me in the ditch which was full of trees. Being a narrow front luckily a tree went along the side of the hood and frame so it didn't tip and stopped before the operator platform (ME!) got into the branches. Never liked the John Deere's after that. With that stupid old power steering that locked up and the hand clutch that clicks into place I just couldn't react fast enough. I have always thought with a foot clutch I could have gotten it stopped but no way to know I guess. Got it towed home and it was restored and got it running a few years later; the hood had to be banged out and the distributor got bent and had to be replaced for it to run.

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On the Deere quad ranges found in the 10 and 20 series, a person needs to pull the shifter past 3rd or 5th into the reverse and then push it back forward to those gears to fully "seat" the gear, especially if the shifter has any wear in it. Well, 10-12 yrs old, still learning tractor skills, I neglected this one little step. I was pulling a full load of idiot cubes back to the barn with the 4320. Coming down a hill, about 1/2 way down, the trans jumped out of 5th and began to freewheel. Of course, I could barely reach the brake pedals and it took a second of panic to figure out what I was supposed to do. I managed to get it stopped, but 1/2 my load of bales was on the ground. Of course it was the last load in on one of those 95F & humid baling days, no one was very happy to be picking bales out of the cornfield.

One of the scariest - I wasn't the one on the tractor. We have an old trailer harrow we pull behind the disk, I was helping Dad hook it up. Ol' Dad isn't as spry or sharp as he used to be. So he gets backed up and I'm muscling the hitch over to get the pin in. Well, Dad assumed I had enough time to get it hooked and without looking back had the 3788 in H1 and dropped the clutch. I did have the pin 1/2 in so it was enough to pull the harrow. I had to vault a harrow section as he took off. Then it was pretty funny as the harrow unhooked and he kept going. Took a few hundred feet before he looked back, thank god I didn't end up underneath those razor sharp spring teeth.

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I was 16 plowing snow with our farmall H. Rear blade and a ton of snow. Stupid me. I pushed too much snow and got the rear wheels stuck. Couldnt back up or drive forward. Just sat and spun. I was rockin it then decided to put it in first and dump the clutch with the blade up. The front end came up about 4 feet in the air and the old girl walked herself out on two wheels. That was a scary moment. Wanted to push in the clutch but couldnt cuz id be stuck again. Every time I load a trailer I get that flashback. Thats why im always super careful.

Chris

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Mowing along the edge of a field with an offset flail mower. Normally if I got too close to a tree it would just push off. Well, this time it caught a large sumac, tall but no real roots. I was caught totally by surprise when I was suddenly enveloped by leaves and branches. It was an old JD with a hand clutch and the tree was keeping me from reaching it. Broke the clutch pulley right off when I hit a big tree and sent me for stitches, still a little confused as to what had happened. I guess it really doesn't qualify as scary as I never had time to be scared but I was confused about where that tree came from.

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Once, all my stupid fault. Heading down a hill in my 450 ( I had just gotten it) in road gear, I knew not to pull the T/A that was common sense......Slowed down a bit with the brakes, stepped on the clutch, released the clutch then stepped on it again and slapped her in to 4'th gear. Dumped the clutch and..... went from about 14,15 mph to about 6 mph.....very very quickly. My chin was on the hood in front of the muffler. You can't double clutch a 450.... :rolleyes::wacko: .That was 25 years ago and haven't tried anything like it again and won't.

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I was spreading manure on some hilly ground with 3588 and big spread all a couple years ago. It was a little slimey on top but had not been having any trouble. The last load I decided I would spread towards home which was down a decent hill. I got part way down and the manure made it behind the tandems on the spreader. That took all the weight off the hind end of the 2+2. This caused the rear end to try and pass the front. I was trying to counter steer but with an articulated tractor it only made it worse. Finally it all slid to a stop and I was able to get going again without any damage but there was a moment of pucker factor.

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Had clear cut a a section of young forest that had been a field 60-70 years ago , Had pulled all the stumps and had a root rake

on my TD 15B making short work of the cleanup , high gear forward and back b@lls to the wall , Backing up towards the edge of field maybe 5mph

I am just ready to hit the decel pedal and something pushes the back of my seat (and me ) right up and over the hood , By the grace of god I had

my hand on the shifter and pulled it into neutral as the big sapling scraped it's way over my back and flattened me , Few scrapes and bruises and

a whole lot of respect for machines was earned that day .

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I was 16 plowing snow with our farmall H. Rear blade and a ton of snow. Stupid me. I pushed too much snow and got the rear wheels stuck. Couldnt back up or drive forward. Just sat and spun. I was rockin it then decided to put it in first and dump the clutch with the blade up. The front end came up about 4 feet in the air and the old girl walked herself out on two wheels. That was a scary moment. Wanted to push in the clutch but couldnt cuz id be stuck again. Every time I load a trailer I get that flashback. Thats why im always super careful.

Chris

I thought yours might have been both front tires blowing out on the road....

I don't have any near as scary as those I've been reading. That being said; I always get a bit uneasy when I'm driving a NFE tractor along and one of the rear wheels goes over something large (clump of junk, root ball, etc) or going up and down a steep grade. I have to remember to be mindful and respectful of how to handle the situation.

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The tires blowing out wasnt too bad. Blew and I had to push the clutch in real quick and not much other fan fare.

Chris

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Mowing along the edge of a field with an offset flail mower. Normally if I got too close to a tree it would just push off. Well, this time it caught a large sumac, tall but no real roots. I was caught totally by surprise when I was suddenly enveloped by leaves and branches. It was an old JD with a hand clutch and the tree was keeping me from reaching it. Broke the clutch pulley right off when I hit a big tree and sent me for stitches, still a little confused as to what had happened. I guess it really doesn't qualify as scary as I never had time to be scared but I was confused about where that tree came from.

Had a similiar incident. Mowing hay with the 806. First pass around the lot. Trying to get as close as I could to a half down tree the left rear tire somehow caught a limb and broke the tree the rest of the way off. I was looking the other direction at the mower and did not see it till it hit me in the back. By the time I got the clutch in and stopped it had me mashed into the steering wheel. Had bruises on my chest and my pride for a bit after that.

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Fathers day 2013 family gathering / picnic in my yard. Good workout for the smoker that day, Lots of Ribs.. Family all left at Dark and I watched the weather report . Said 3 days of no rain. Better Mow hay right? 3rd round with the 806 and discbine. Tall hay H-1 Headlights. Loving the day. Then the front axle drops in a 4 ft deep hole.

Snapped off the bolster casting. Drove the left front wheel up under the clutch linkage and I couldnt push the pedal in. For about 3 seconds. the old girl Pawed and snorted until I got her shut down.

I still have a mark on the top of my foot from the bottom of the clutch pedal.

Tile washout courtesy of ground hog. 4 foot wide and 4 foot deep hole. Dealer had the parts in stock and I was able to bale the hay on that field with the same 806 4 days later

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My scariest ride was in my van, not a tractor, but several years ago I was on my way home from a job in my '92 GMC van, lifted the throttle a little as I topped a hill and it didn't slow down. Kicked the gas pedal a couple of times and rpms wouldn't go down. Had enough time to plan for the next intersection: slowed it down with the brakes (lots of pedal pressure) enough to make the turn, then had about 7 more miles till home. Did a trial stop on the way: everything I could put on the brake pedal and could just barely hold it back.

When I got to the next intersection, a couple of blocks from home, I stood hard on the brakes, was able to hold it long enough for traffic to clear, then got to my driveway, backed in and shut her down.

Turns out the old cruise control linkage had worn through and caught on something, holding the throttle open. Easy fix, scary ride.

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I know I've mentioned it before (and recently) but our 806 (gas) had rust in the tank for ages (until I finally cleaned it properly last year). On steep hills sometimes it would die. Normally it would be just momentary and you could crank it again and keep on your way. I was 17 or 18 with a 4 bottom plow (fast hitch) behind me on the road going up the steepest hill in this area. Steep enough when walking down it, you have to do it at a jog. Well naturally it died, so I did a quick brake/clutch combo to restart. Naturally it didn't start. After the 1st pump the brakes disappeared and I was quickly heading over the hill backwards and overpowered compression. It was picking up speed and starting to hop around. I made a hasty decision to drop the plow. It did bring me to a stop and cut 4 nice ruts in the road and yanked me to the berm and dug in hard, stopping me before the drop off. I took 5 or 10 minutes to get rid of the adrenaline shakes, then took the fuel bowl off, cleaned it out, rapped the petcock and put it all back together. It started, I picked up the plow and continued on.

I don't remember what all we had to do to the plow but it took a beating. That hill is notorious even in a car during the winter. A lot of accidents have occurred there going down and up. But, no other way around for many miles as the bridge crosses a deep creek bed.

After the recent conversation I'm excited to service the check valve and get the brakes working like they are supposed to. If I knew it wasn't supposed to be that way I would have fixed it years ago. :)

In years afterwards I would drive up that hill backwards as I didn't want to ever go that fast in reverse again.

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My scariest ride was in my van,

Turns out the old cruise control linkage had worn through and caught on something, holding the throttle open. Easy fix, scary ride.

Sounds a bit like an incident in my yard many years ago when the secondaries on the quadrajet of a big old Buick stuck wide open while the driver was making a circuit of the yard. No damage done other than some torn up grass by the time the driver got it shut down.

The worst I've done is flip the Loadstar (yes, my avatar photo) upside down in a ditch with a part load of seed and fertilizer. Long story but at the end of the day I drove that truck home and was back at work next day.

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One of the scarier things I was fifteen and running the 3750 gallon spreader down the road empty and some moron passed me on a blind corner in the woods and immediately slowed down in front of me. I guess they were not happy about the slow traffic sharing the road with them. I didn't slow down at all and by the time I could not see the car over the hood of the tractor anymore they took off like a bat outa %&$# .

Not tractor related but when in school we lived on a two lane road with 16-17k cars per day with a hill. School bus driver grabbed the back collar of the first girl getting off the bus almost choking her . He saw the 18 wheeler passing on the berm and most likely saved her life

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I know I've mentioned it before (and recently) but our 806 (gas) had rust in the tank for ages (until I finally cleaned it properly last year). On steep hills sometimes it would die. Normally it would be just momentary and you could crank it again and keep on your way. I was 17 or 18 with a 4 bottom plow (fast hitch) behind me on the road going up the steepest hill in this area. Steep enough when walking down it, you have to do it at a jog. Well naturally it died, so I did a quick brake/clutch combo to restart. Naturally it didn't start. After the 1st pump the brakes disappeared and I was quickly heading over the hill backwards and overpowered compression. It was picking up speed and starting to hop around. I made a hasty decision to drop the plow. It did bring me to a stop and cut 4 nice ruts in the road and yanked me to the berm and dug in hard, stopping me before the drop off. I took 5 or 10 minutes to get rid of the adrenaline shakes, then took the fuel bowl off, cleaned it out, rapped the petcock and put it all back together. It started, I picked up the plow and continued on.

I don't remember what all we had to do to the plow but it took a beating. That hill is notorious even in a car during the winter. A lot of accidents have occurred there going down and up. But, no other way around for many miles as the bridge crosses a deep creek bed.

After the recent conversation I'm excited to service the check valve and get the brakes working like they are supposed to. If I knew it wasn't supposed to be that way I would have fixed it years ago. :)

In years afterwards I would drive up that hill backwards as I didn't want to ever go that fast in reverse again.

Your story reminds me of a neighbor who had a pin fall out of the clutch linkage on his 1086. He was tearing down the road in the fall with the chisel behind and came up to a bridge he decided was too narrow for the chisel at the last moment. Slowed down the throttle and depressed the clutch but no clutch release. He was quick to get it into neutral, but still coasting pretty good so he dropped the chisel in the road. Only problem was the shanks dug in so hard they stretched way back and then released from the road then dug into the road again. He said that happened about three times and when he finally came to a stop he said he was laying between the steering wheel and the windshield (little guy). Bruised up, but only wrecked the road. Said he did not care to repeat the event at all. Not entirely sure what the brake issue was with his 1086, story is repeated as he told it to me.

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I was 6, tiny little short kid, been driving the Farmall H some. For some reason Dad put me on the 400 Case and told me to take it to the door yard. Down the hill around a corner and into the barn lot. Dad put it in gear and set me off and stepped off. Tractor was in a low gear and quite flat. I let it coast to a stop. Of course I was too short to hit the clutch and the brakes. Took it out of gear and it started rolling. I could not get it into gear. It really took off, faster than I could get reset in the seat and hit the brakes. I went down the hill, stumps on both sides of the old rough farm road, hanging on to the steering wheel, legs flailing when the seat lifted me off the floorboards. I was smart enough to run right straight ahead, probably 20 mph, right into the bunk silo. Stopped the tractor fast. I hated that tractor for a long time. Had been bucked off a horse a few times before, wasn't letting that tractor buck me off into those back wheels, but I sure wasn't in the saddle much on that ride. More than an 8 second ride, sure it wasn't more than one but felt like 10. I set there for 10 minutes trying to get my legs to stop shaking so I could climb off....James

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Back when I was 22 ,I was delivering a load of manure to a customer for his garden. I asked before I drove across his yard if there was anything out there. Nope, well the front wheels started sinking a bit then when the rears crossed the spot over the truck went. I climbed out the passenger window. Truck had an 18' body with 4 ft side with sh*t heaped. had driven over an old cold frame that had been filled in many years before. I dug the manure out of the body with a pitchfork then brought my tractor over to pull the truck back on its wheels. Let it sit for awhile then fired it up and drove home with a $25 check in my pocket. I still have the truck 40 years later. Hey , its an INTERNATIONAL

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Co-workers Dad had a bad one this last spring that unfortunately wasn't just a close call. He was taking part in some tractor rodeo, one of the tricks was to push a plastic barrel around with the front of the tractor. Well he was pushing it around with his A or B, and the barrel got away from him. A rear tire ran up on the barrel and threw him off. Next thing he knew the tractor ran him over & broke his hip/pelvis. Was a scary ordeal for all attending, lucky for him it wasn't life ending.

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In the spring of 2013 I went to plant some corn for my uncle. He had plowed some hay under, and had it ready to plant. It had rained a little bit that morning, but not enough to make it muddy. So I headed down across his hay field on a grass path with my 766 with my White 6100 planter that has 6900 splitter bar set up for twin rows. This part of Iowa is not flat and infact this field if very steep in spots. So as I'm taking my time going down the hill. I was in H1 half throttle, PTO running to warm up the oil in the PTO pump for the planters' blower. About 2/3 of the way down this grass hill, it goes from steep to steeper and the rear wheels started sliding, I shoved in the clutch and eased on the brakes and the wheels just kept sliding. The farther I went the faster we went, after maybe 75 feet, we were probably going 15 mph or faster and I was doing all I could to keep it straight, but it right, then it went left and then it went completely sideways to the right, I remember seeing the planter at 90 degrees to the tractor, it was still going straight, the tractor was sideways and sliding fast! At the bottom of this hill is a small creek. By now I've slid over 100' and swearing wasn't helping, I was pretty sure it was going to flip and I was going to die, it seemed like we were going 50 mph by now, but probably 20 mph anyway! For some reason the planter swung around the back of the tractor and eventually got below me, which caused the tractor to slide around even further which got the front end pointed back uphill! That's when it stopped, I was pointed back up hill the planter tounge was against the right rear tire of the tractor and nothing was damaged! I pulled forward a bit to get the tire away from the tongue, the PTO pump was back there running, so I crossed the creek and drove up the other side to the field that I was going to plant. I got off to pull the transport pins for the marker arms. I got the first one done, and put the pin back in and put the clip back in it. I got the second arm released and I got shaking so bad that I couldn't put the pin back in place with one hand and it took both hands to get the cotter clip back in the second pin! That happened very fast and probably didn't last 10 seconds but it was plenty of time to think about dying and I remember being pissed at myself for not putting the fluid back in when I had new tubes put in the rear tires the year before. Somehow I got the corn planted, but there were a lot of "what if's" that went through my mind while I was planting it!

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about 5 years ago I was coming back from the elevator with the

5288. the left rear tire and rim came off. the tractor rode on the

side of the draw bar area. I managed to get her slowed down and

off to the side of the road. I was on a hill going down it. all I could

do was watch the tire roll down the road. luckily no one was coming

at me. the tire started to verve toward the ditch but found the only

opening to a field and ended up in a creek. made a phone

call and got some reinforcements. fished the wheel out of the creek.

the water was cold too. neighbor bought his bigger loader tractor

to help remount the tire. took about 2 hrs. to get going again. got home

and there wasn't any damage to the tractor. I still can see the groove

cut in the road from the tractor as a constant remember of how lucky I was.

Duane

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Some of these stories have me confused. When goin down a hill and such why do you push the clutch in? Gut reaction trying to get it stopped? It was a verry big rule in my household that you never push the clutch in when going down a hill. Mash the brakes but not the clutch. Im not calling anyone out. If I was sliding I prolly would mash the clutch too.

Chris

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Some of these stories have me confused. When goin down a hill and such why do you push the clutch in? Gut reaction trying to get it stopped? It was a verry big rule in my household that you never push the clutch in when going down a hill. Mash the brakes but not the clutch. Im not calling anyone out. If I was sliding I prolly would mash the clutch too.

Chris

If the tractor is sliding on the rear tires its not going to hold back at all. Pushing in the clutch allows it to hopefully keep straight.

Fil always said he didn't mind any up hill climb as you can try to dig a hole to hold yourself on the hill

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