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bitty

kaput 7140

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Ventilated block on the 7140. It was on the mixer grinding a bale , unattended and kaboom. Has a hole in the left side right where the oil fill was. Can see a bearing piece and possibility some cam piece. Full of oil , maybe too much but it didn't look milky or smell like fuel. I will look at it in the daylight.

My question is where is the best place to buy a complete engine, or at least a long block . has 12k hours ? We have only had it for the last 3k

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Ooh sorry to hear that. Thats kind of unusual.....those engines usually go lnger than that dont they? Wonder if it had a tough life previously? Where did it come from?

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We got it at a consignment sale. Six of our magnums were pretty used by the time we got them . only our original 8950 was a year old with 560 hours and like new . We have only done one engine before because of a spun bearing. 89 has over 15k on the original engine yet

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Is it an early 1987 to 1990 model? If so, this is a common problem. I saw a 1988 model 7110 on a manure pump do this 10 years ago. But it was the #6 rod that let go and hit the fuel filters. Then it went poof and burnt out the engine and cab. If it is an early one check to see how much oil is in the pan and how much is in the clutch housing. The problem is the rear crankshaft oil seal and it leaks oil into the clutch housing. Since the #1 gets fed with oil first it is #6 that is starved of oil and it lets go. CIH had a program to fix these at one time and anything from 1991 and on has the new style of seal.

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Great timing huh?

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Great timing huh?

Could have been worse. Wasn't Sunday morning.

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A bad injector can eat a piston and cause that .

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Not knocking a hole in the block but I think 10,000 hrs is the life of those engines from what the dealer here says. I know they put a lot oh rebuilt engines in magnums here. The service manager the other day was telling me they had a tractor that had a bearing roll at 6000 hrs and it was back in for injector and pump at 12000. He was debating if they should spend money for the guy on bearings again or just let it blow and put a rebuilt in it as far as rebuilding engines they don't really do that anymore on the smaller tractors just put reman engines in. Our combine has 6000 engine hrs and they always say should double combine hrs to match tractor engine life so it will need some attention this year.

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Aint a reman the same as rebuilt? Just a matter of who does it?

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Aint a reman the same as rebuilt? Just a matter of who does it?

reman comes with a warranty

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Now is your chance to get Dirtboyz to put a 5488 front end on it and make a real tractor out of it.

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It is so much cheaper and faster to get a reman engine with warranty than doing all the work in house. They still rebuild engines but mostly m11 n14 cummins and the easy stuff. If you figure all the stuff you need. Head rebuilt, oil pump, balancer ,oil cooler , water pump it ends being cheaper for a whole engine.

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It will be a reman or new as the block and cam are broken . 85% matching rear dual radials , nice interior and overall appearance. Trans working fine . we will want to fix most likely

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too bad dirt boyz don't still have the front off the 5388 he built. It would have bolted right up in a matter of hours.

jerry

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what was wrong with the early magnums I was told a lot of them were on recall, the one we bought 7 years ago from western Minnesota had been overhauled at 2000 hours we had bought it with 4000 hours and were able to talk to the first owner and look at the history

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There was no recall on Magnums for engine rebuild. There were several updates, I think I did about a dozen or so tractors, but that was for hitch valves, aux valves, couplers, transmission control valves improvments etc. Yes the engines were changed in several ways but no co. recall. Different pistons and rings, some things on the rocker arms, improvements in the lubricating system and the block was changed to more material between cylinders etc just to name a few. All machines are pretty much constantly improved as production rolls along.

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We have a 7110 that used oil from day one, I complained to the dealer about it and they got the territory manager to talk to me about it. I told him it was using way to much oil for a new engine , we traded a 1086 with 9000 hrs. that didnt use that much! It would easily drink 3 quarts in 100 hrs. He tells me thats acceptable oil consumtion for that engine, I call BS. Broke the rings in no.6 cylinder at about 900hrs , they replaced everything in that hole and at 2500hrs it broke the rings in no. 5 cylinder- now they put all six holes in new. The service manager said they found there was a problem with the rings being too brittle or something and when they were spread too install they would crack. This tractor has 10,000hrs on it now and I haven't added oil to it since, but yes I have changed it at least a couple of times

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All engine mfg's have charts of acceptable oil consumption. You would be very surprised at how much they say is OK. It goes by cubic inch of a given engine and rated rpm's. I did a whole lot of arguing with service reps over the years. I would ask them if they were supposed to use a quart in ten hours, what the heck is wrong with the ones that don't use enough oil. One of the changes in the pistons on that engine was the original ones did not use a full keystone ring and a NI-insert in the piston. Then the rings stick and break or ring groove wears so much the ring breaks. I overhauled a few magnums also for oil consumption problems early on. I left CaseIH dealer in 95 and there were still a lot of low hour engines around though so don't know what became of them for life. Actually most in our area had the later pistons from new. I remember the John Deere service mgr showing me that Deere used a keystone ring. I said, IH used them in the Farmall 450 diesel engine but he would not believe me. Thought Deere was up on IH I guess.

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After hearing all of this, I think I will just stick with an IH 400 series diesel and be done with it.

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After hearing all of this, I think I will just stick with an IH 400 series diesel and be done with it.

I'd take the 8.3. I have had a bunch of both and the Cummins is less prone to cavitation and in my opinion is more fuel efficient per horsepower hour. We have had two needing engine work out of six with a total hours on them of over 83,000 . two of them are 15+16k each and I know that the 15k one never had an overhaul

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After hearing all of this, I think I will just stick with an IH 400 series diesel and be done with it.

I'd take the 8.3. I have had a bunch of both and the Cummins is less prone to cavitation and in my opinion is more fuel efficient per horsepower hour. We have had two needing engine work out of six with a total hours on them of over 83,000 . two of them are 15+16k each and I know that the 15k one never had an overhaul

and I was wondering about mine just about to hit 7000hrs, should last along time yet

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After hearing all of this, I think I will just stick with an IH 400 series diesel and be done with it.

I'd take the 8.3. I have had a bunch of both and the Cummins is less prone to cavitation and in my opinion is more fuel efficient per horsepower hour. We have had two needing engine work out of six with a total hours on them of over 83,000 . two of them are 15+16k each and I know that the 15k one never had an overhaul

and I was wondering about mine just about to hit 7000hrs, should last along time yet
For us they have

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what year did they change the pistons the 2 wheel drive we bought had 5000 hours on came from Johnson tractor in Janesville bought it in 08 came with a notebook of everything that was done to it but no motor work now about 6ooo hours

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what year did they change the pistons the 2 wheel drive we bought had 5000 hours on came from Johnson tractor in Janesville bought it in 08 came with a notebook of everything that was done to it but no motor work now about 6ooo hours

A little history on the piston changes on the early Magnums. The first piston design on the CDC 8.3L used a nickel insert(called Ni-Resist) on the piston ring land around the top piston ring ONLY. For the most part, this design seemed to work OK on the Magnums. When CaseIH installed the 8.3L in the combines(which started on April 1, 1989-about a year and a half after the Magnums started production), they found out that they had a problem. The second ring(which was just a rectangular ring to begin with) started breaking in short hour intervals-usually before the first oil change. The problem was that the second ring would cause very high wear on the ring lands on the piston around the second ring due to the fact that there was no Ni-Resist insert on the piston itself. Eventually the second ring would beat on the piston, causing breakage of both the piston and rings. Eventually CDC did develop a stronger piston that used a Ni-Resist insert around both piston compression rings, as well as switching to a keystone ring for the second ring(like pete23 mentioned). CaseIH did rework all the engines in the combines and cotton pickers to the later-style pistons back in 1991-92. They did not offer any kind of program like this for the engines used in the Magnums. According to the parts book, these changes occurred at Engine Serial Number 44536857. There is no tractor serial number suggested that would correspond with this; however some service information I have indicates that the change happened sometime in early 1991. The engine oil filter/oil cooler change was made at ESN#44500128, and that happened in late summer/early fall of 1990. So all of the Magnums with the small oil filter would have the weaker pistons. As far as engine life with the weaker pistons, I've seen early 7140s run 12,000 hrs. with the weak pistons, I've seen 7110s not make 2000 hrs. Its just more or less a crapshoot.

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