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1954 TD6 track roller lubrication.


Englishcreek

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Just bought a 1954 TD6. According to the manual the track rollers should be lubricated with the 'bucket lubricator'.....I have a vague idea what this is, but do not have one. Can anyone advise how I can lubricate these rollers? .....where can I buy a lubricator and appropriate fittings?

Thanks!

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Hello Enghishcreek

Welcome, The rollers take a special fitting. you clean around the roller and take out the pipe plug napa sells the complete set of grease adaptures that fit.

I can't remember the # of hand. It has both button types and the pipe one you need. you screw in the pipe plug that has a short pipe attached Most guys use corn grease I use grease.as u pump grease in the old grease is forced out. You will know when to stop when clean grease comes out.If you go to napa it may not come up on the computer they will have to look in the large tool book.

Hope this helps Tuscarora trader

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I have this lubrication project ahead of me also, so I will be watching too. I do have the bucket lubricator, but have to dig it out and see if it still functions. I see the pipe plugs in all the bottom rollers. Guess I need to soak them with some blaster. Thanks for the hints on the pipe going into these threaded holes.

Regards,

Chris

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Thanks for the replies. So the fitting screws in and has a hose attached? Wil try my local Napa tomorrow......although usually they require a part number or they are unwilling to engage their brain muscles....lol. My rollers don't appear to have any plugs screwed in.....their is a large round fitting with a flange/groove around the outside edge and what appears to be a sprung plug in the center.

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Thanks for the replies. So the fitting screws in and has a hose attached? Wil try my local Napa tomorrow......although usually they require a part number or they are unwilling to engage their brain muscles....lol. My rollers don't appear to have any plugs screwed in.....their is a large round fitting with a flange/groove around the outside edge and what appears to be a sprung plug in the center.

You've got what I seem to remember is called a Giant Button fitting. Which the 1952 TD 6 that I grew up with had. You might mangle one in use but not too often. The crawler came with a bucket lubricator (ours made by Lincoln) which has a hose and a fitting with a lever that locks it on the button. I'd be sure you would find a used one pretty easily.

The TD 6 is gone (but still lives) but you can't put in a claim for our bucket - it now does 30 oil weight for the FA 10 rollers . Which says they'll take a long time to wear out. Plus it is in Oz.

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I got a new end for a grease gun from NAPA to lube the ones on my Cat D2. I used John Deere Corn Head grease in it. NLG 0 grease which is like a light grease at rest, but like a heavy oil when agitated in a roller or gearbox. It is also a favorite for bush hog gearboxes that have started to weep gear oil.

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Looks about right.

The Lincoln one has a lever that works a pin that pushes the sprung plug in. Not sure whether this is to allow the grease in easier or just to hold the fitting on the button or some of both.

I've never tried using a standard grease gun - I think that you'll get plenty of practice filling the grease gun but it will work if you can't find a bucket, and that the bucket pump probably puts out more grease per stroke.

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At one time you could buy a low pressure grease gun for lubing button fittings. The roller seals could blow out using a high pressure gun.

John

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Folks,

So I assume then that the bucket lubricator is low pressure?

Englishcreek,

That link to the item on ebay helps understand how this works. Looks like spring pressure around the button head. And then the grease forces the little valve open for the grease to enter.

So my book says use UGL 80-90 which is way lighter than the grease I have found in them. Last time I checked with NAPA on the 00 corn head grease their eyes rolled to the back of there heads!

Regards,

Chris

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Chris,

Those bottom rollers have a brass sleeve (bushing) for the bearing surface. NLGI #1 or #2 Grease is to thick to finds its way between the bushing surface and the pin.

The regular grease is a waste of time over the long run. There is wear occurring every revolution.

If the seals are still good, 30 weight oil is the lubricant of choice. If the seals are toast, then corn head grease.

I was thinking I saw some of the corn head grease at Tractor Supply or similar store.

Dave

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I buy my corn head grease at the John Deere dealer in regular tubes. The bucket luber just uses straight out of the 5 gallon buckets. For my limited use the tubes are fine. Just use discretion with the high pressure gun, although chance are the seals will be worn enough to relieve the pressure if you don't pump too fast.

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Folks,

On the fittings that I took out, there was a light colored almost clear, semi thin grease in there. Wasn't running out, just not real thick. So I would assume it was similar to if not the corn head grease mentioned. The bottom rollers had this grease in them too. So that may mean the seals are not as good as they used to be in the lower track rollers?

Been to busy today Christmas shopping for the kids, grandkids and great grandson.

Hope things are good out in IH land!

Regards,

Chris

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Chris,

Those bottom rollers have a brass sleeve (bushing) for the bearing surface. NLGI #1 or #2 Grease is to thick to finds its way between the bushing surface and the pin.

The regular grease is a waste of time over the long run. There is wear occurring every revolution.

If the seals are still good, 30 weight oil is the lubricant of choice. If the seals are toast, then corn head grease.

I was thinking I saw some of the corn head grease at Tractor Supply or similar store.

Dave

Dave

The lube for rollers wasn't regular grease - at least not till they and the seals got pretty worn. Nor was it 30 weight oil.

As I recall it was "semi-fluid chassis lubricant" and I have the remainder of a bucket of Mobilgrease 3L left over from that use..

Seems like the "O" series of greases fit that description these days - according to the googler. - read

http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/general/mobilgrease-no-3-what-stuff-286225/

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Uh, I fully agree Ian,

I wasn't saying it should be regular grease. My dozer and the ones under my 175C are full of 30 weight oil, which is what the books call for. That is the lube of choice.

What I was saying is grease is too thick to lube a sleeve bearing. It never works over the long run. It will prolong one for a little while if it's worn plumb out, but it will still fail in the end. With the age of some of the machines, and the inevitability of the seals or seal area being bad and probably not going to be changed or repaired, corn head grease is the lube of choice. It has enough oil in the carrier to drop out very readily and provide a film between the sleeve bearing and pin contact area. My understanding is it works very well.

All sleeve and babbitt bearings in industry that I fool with are oil lubrication.

Sorry for the confusion. :wacko:

Dave

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post-54438-0-44166900-1450536980_thumb.jpost-54438-0-08138200-1450537025_thumb.jDave is right on this. In the later machines you use a tube that goes into the roller shaft after the plug is removed, use 30 weight oil. If your seals are leaking then go to a heavier weight such as gear oil (80/140). The earlier machines that have the button fittings used the 80/140 gear oil. If your rollers have a plug the rollers may have been replaced with the later style rollers and seals, they are usually a lifetime roller that do not take any lube unless you see a leaking seal. If you use grease it will plug up the holes in the shaft.

Item G is the lubricator for the late style rollers with the pipe plug.

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Dave and Louie

Actually no argument on this.

I recall that greasing the rollers on our TD 6 was a daily job, and presume that the excess grease helped keep any dirt out of the roller - for a while anyway.

And I'm guessing that the semi-fluid grease was in keeping with particularly the roller seal technology of the era and that improved to where lifetime rollers could keep oil in.

You'll note that our bucket lube pump now does duty with 30 weight for the rollers on our FA 10 as the capacity is handy. I made the roller fitting around a giant button fitting (still the same thread as the TD 6) with part of the thread ground off to provide a leak so the roller doesn't get pressurised

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Seems like they changed roller parts on a regular basis. Even single or double flange options seemed to be subject to opinion.

Allis was the only non bushing roller at the time? Or at least somewhere along in there.

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