Jump to content

800, 900, 950, 955, 1200 Corn planters - differences and preferences?


Cooter

Recommended Posts

I'm in the market for a new liquid planter so I have been scouring tractor house trying to decipher price and condition. What are the differences between the 800, 900, 950, 955 air planters? They all look like the same row units and early riser monitors. Was it just a cosmetic upgrade? I have been told by many deere and kinzie guys that cyclo planters were junk. They can't control accurate seed spacing pushing it down a tube with air, especially the outside rows. We have had air planters forever and never had an issue with them, but I want to hear what others think. There really aren't many cyclo's around us, most everyone uses green or blue planters and swear by them, so I started to think there was something to it.

Then I was looking at 1200 planters which appear to be a plate, cup, or finger style individual row unit, did CNH do away with the air planter? Are the 1200 planters like the Kinzie/deere design?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The 1200 style uses a vacuum to uncover peripheral holes in a rotating vertically mounted plate. This holds the seeds in place until it passes by the area blocked to vacuum and then the seed falls down the tube to the opener. Very clever design and several other planters are similar (like White). I have a 3 year old 1220 6 row model and believe me there is nothing like it for depth control and picket fence rows of corn. The spacing is very uniform between plants. From everything I have seen, the 1200 series is superior to all previous planters. The 1220, 1230, 1240 and 1250 are newer versions of the 1200. The current version is the 1225, 1235, 1245, 1255. I regard the newer versions as just fine tuning a superior planter.

The only problem with the 1200 series planters is that they are expensive to buy both used and new. But isn't that the way with anything that is a good product.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The air planters were a great idea, and still the best for planting beans. But your neighbors are right about spacing. you simply can't control the seed spacing accurately when one seed starts bouncing in the tube while the next flies thru without touching. In fact, the newest JD planters now use a "elevator" to carry the seed right down to the ground before releasing it, because even the traditional 2' long seed tube can cause some seed bounce. Precision Planting did a great job studying and proving the mechanics of "seed delivery", look at the info on their website.

However, it depends on your conditions. Is seed spacing what is limiting your yields? Will do no good buying an expensive high end planter if your fertility (for example) is the limit. I get by fine with a well maintained JD 7000 finger planter for corn. I use a Cyclo air box mounted on a JD frame /units for beans. I'm not trying for high yield, just high return. So for my small acreage, I tend to go for less fertilizer and cheaper machinery.

One of my neighbors spent $50K or so rebuilding his late model JD planter with the "elevator" tubes and a bunch of other stuff, and insists it pays in yield/return. Since he is totally precise about tracking/recording EVERYTHING...I have to believe him!

The 800-955 were all pretty similar, and was a fair planter with good running units. The only problem I've heard was the air delivery in corn. They make great bean planters.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd take what precision says with a grain of salt...............I believe they were the same wing nuts who rated the max-emerge row unit better than the early riser, which anyone with any common sense could see is BS. So far in my life time I planted with the following planters...............JD 290, IH 400 Cyclo, 4-38 New Idea(Kinze), 8-38 JD 7000 finger, 6-30 JD 7200 finger with precision meters, and a 6-30 JD 1750 Vac with 20/20, bulls eye seed tubes and ESET meters with pro drives.

I learned one thing through all of it.............Best planter is the one best gone over before you need it. And the Precision BS is highly over-rated, especially the 20/20. And honestly, if I need a planter in the future, It will be a later Cyclo that I would adapt Deere row sensors to so I could run a 350 monitor. Use plenty of graphite, keep good chains on it, and they will treat you right, and god love central fill!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I believe the Max-emerge vs Early riser debate had a lot to do with soil and tillage. Locally, the Early Riser is almost extinct because the JD/Kinze design works better in our conditions. PP isn't all that far away in fairly similar conditions , which may be why they rated it as they did.

As far as Precision, I'm not meaning their products. I'm not personally sold on the necessity of all that stuff. However, the original post was about plant spacing and planters, PP is a good reference to study that. They have done extensive testing on what affects plant spacing in the row, what can be done about it, and how it typically correlates to yield. I've seen some of their planter testbeds with sensors hanging all over them and real-time data logging...as an engineer myself it was impressive.

I totally agree with you on the "bast planter" maintenance point. I too love center fill for beans...but I wouldn't have enough corn seed to fill it once! The downside is ya gotta get the seed all the way UP THERE somehow. I use a good heavy loader with forks and just hold a Pro-box over my air hopper. 10 seconds to fill the hopper! I admit that 50 bu of seed hanging over your planter is a bit scary.

Heck, I use an old IH runner planter to fix holes, etc....and the corn always does just fine.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We've owned a couple 40s, 800, Kinze 2600, Kinze 3600, JD 1790 & currently own a CIH 1200 & a 1250. I prefer the 1200/ 1250 planters as far as spacing & depth control over any of the others. Kinzes would be next in line, then the 1790 followed by the 800, 900, & the 400 in that order. Still have a 400 for planting sweetcorn. May not be the most accurate but you can't be it foe ease. Just take the drum off, throw in the seed, spin the drum & plant and a whole heck of a lot simpler cleanig the drum out than all the meters on the Kinzes, JD, & the newer CIHs.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...

I found a 900 plate planter on Tractor house:

http://www.tractorhouse.com/listings/farm-equipment/for-sale/10375203/2005-case-ih-900

 I thought they only made Air drum planters?  Has anyone used them before?  I would think it would be something like the JD 7000 planters?  Could that be the best of both worlds, the depth control of the row unit and the accuracy of a plate?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nope, not the same as a 7000 finger pickup---its OLD school, a horizontal plate with notches (cells).   Both JD and CIH made plate versions for specialty crops and some other specific uses.  Very hard to find as they are rare.   

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We've owned a cih 1250 with liquid starter for eight years now.  Seed spacing and depth control are great.  In the past we've used a 800 12 row and a JD 7000 12 row.  Agree with comments above regarding their ability on depth and spacing.  Our yields increased with the 1250.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Jeff-C-IL said:

Nope, not the same as a 7000 finger pickup---its OLD school, a horizontal plate with notches (cells).   Both JD and CIH made plate versions for specialty crops and some other specific uses.  Very hard to find as they are rare.   

So, they are not a good planter?  I would think that corn and bean plates would be pretty easy to find.  Seems like a plate would give you that fence post spacing as well as the deere/Kinzie design.  I can agree with the belt that delivers the seed 2" above the dirt probably being the best type, but seems like a plate planter would be more accurate than an air planter.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nothing wrong with a plate planter.  Just more hassle to change the plates between every crop, and match the seed size to the plates.   One of the big reasons to go to the air drum or finger pickup was that it could use a variety of seed sizes--"plateless" seed.  Actually didn't turn out as well as they said at first...I remember both JD and IH saying you could plant any seed size, but farmers soon found out that uniform seed worked better.  And it didn't take long for the seed companies to make plateless the same cost as MR or MFs.....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

FWIW I bought my 8x30 800, with all the 900 updates for $1350 last summer. It's got 6 different drums, dry fertilizer, monitor, AND came with the marker advance switch/plate that bolted right into the 5088 like the factory designed it to.

That 900 plate planter you linked to is way over priced....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 1/24/2017 at 10:40 PM, brahamfireman said:

FWIW I bought my 8x30 800, with all the 900 updates for $1350 last summer. It's got 6 different drums, dry fertilizer, monitor, AND came with the marker advance switch/plate that bolted right into the 5088 like the factory designed it to.

That 900 plate planter you linked to is way over priced....

 

Yea, I know it's the wrong time of year to buy a planter, I was just trying to get everyone's opinion on how good the air planters really were.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Does anyone run a 3-point mount planter with the gauge wheels off the back?  I see quite a few of those pretty cheap, but I didn't know how well they worked.  Are those lift wheels problematic?  They look pretty heavy, so I'm assuming you need a pretty big horse to mount them on.  I'm thinking of going to 12 row and those seem like a reasonable entry to do so.  Does the double drum system work well?  If I wanted to go liquid, I thought you could pull a nurse tank behind it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had a 12 row 900 vertical fold before the 950 front fold I have now. I had it on a 3688. That's the minumum you'll need for a tractor IMO. You'll need duals and a full set of front weights. Don't figure on over 15 MPH road speed. Some of them liked to crack the frame where the assist wheels attach under the seed hoppers. Avoid transport with seed in the hoppers. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 1/26/2017 at 0:16 AM, FarmerFixEmUp said:

I had a 12 row 900 vertical fold before the 950 front fold I have now. I had it on a 3688. That's the minumum you'll need for a tractor IMO. You'll need duals and a full set of front weights. Don't figure on over 15 MPH road speed. Some of them liked to crack the frame where the assist wheels attach under the seed hoppers. Avoid transport with seed in the hoppers. 

Did you like it?  Is it basically two 6 row planters on one frame? Were there two separate monitors or just one?  It would be hard, I think, to go from field to field having to empty the hoppers for road transport.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I liked it OK. Liked it a lot better after I put a pull type hitch on it. Mine cracked the frame where I described earlier and had to have it fixed. It just had one monitor. There were 3 rows on each wing and the hoppers are next to each other on the main frame. If you are going to use liquid fertilizer I'd put tanks on the tractor or pull a caddy like you said. It would be kind of difficult to get backed into a corner with a caddy though. 

What I have now is a front fold 950. It's a Friesen built toolbar. They can be bought pretty reasonable too. But it's heavy in transport since the hoppers are on the wings and you carry them on the drawbar. It came with a drawbar support that attaches to the 3rd link. I use my 5288 on it and wouldn't go any smaller than a 5088 or 1086 myself. The fertilizer tanks are on the planter. 

 

What do you have available for a tractor? 

5288 950 002 (Large).jpg

 

5288 950 003 (Large).jpg150430_001 (Large).jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here's a factory CaseIH vertical fold pull type  I've only ever seen one other one like it.

 

 http://www.tractorhouse.com/listings/farm-equipment/for-sale/10420121/case-ih-950

 

This one's a lot like mine and about 1/2 what I paid. And it has the fertilizer on it already. 

http://www.tractorhouse.com/listings/farm-equipment/for-sale/10420121/case-ih-950

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, FarmerFixEmUp said:

I liked it OK. Liked it a lot better after I put a pull type hitch on it. Mine cracked the frame where I described earlier and had to have it fixed. It just had one monitor. There were 3 rows on each wing and the hoppers are next to each other on the main frame. If you are going to use liquid fertilizer I'd put tanks on the tractor or pull a caddy like you said. It would be kind of difficult to get backed into a corner with a caddy though. 

What I have now is a front fold 950. It's a Friesen built toolbar. They can be bought pretty reasonable too. But it's heavy in transport since the hoppers are on the wings and you carry them on the drawbar. It came with a drawbar support that attaches to the 3rd link. I use my 5288 on it and wouldn't go any smaller than a 5088 or 1086 myself. The fertilizer tanks are on the planter. 

 

What do you have available for a tractor? 

 

My other thought with the caddy is you would have to have the hitch beyond the row units to clear them in a turn and that would make a long lever to drag that trailer through soft ground; I could see it causing as many problems as it solves.   I would probably put it on the magnum or 2+2.  I actually thought the 2+2 would work the best to off set the weight of the planter, I just wondered how much wagging it was cause every time you turned the wheel.

 

10 hours ago, FarmerFixEmUp said:

Here's a factory CaseIH vertical fold pull type  I've only ever seen one other one like it.

 

 http://www.tractorhouse.com/listings/farm-equipment/for-sale/10420121/case-ih-950

 

This one's a lot like mine and about 1/2 what I paid. And it has the fertilizer on it already. 

http://www.tractorhouse.com/listings/farm-equipment/for-sale/10420121/case-ih-950

These are both the same link, did you want to show me another planter?

I like the idea of the mounted with wings much better than an end-transport.  To me that looks like a big hassle to move from field to field.  I like the looks or your 955 with the hoppers on the wings, it would appear the tubes would be all relatively the same length.  That was a concern when I first posted, the rows directly under the drum have a short drop, while the end rows have the furthest to travel and I didn't know how that would ultimately impact your spacing.  The green and blue guys say it's a big difference, but I wonder how much of a difference it really makes.  I'm not farming thousands of acres, so perhaps the impact is minimal.

 

No one has really answered the main question, other than the 1200 which is a completely different animal, what are the differences between the 800, 900, 950, & 955?  Is it just a decal upgrade?  The row units all look the same, the monitors appear to be the same, and the basic planter doesn't look any different, so that was my question.   Could I buy a wore 800 and rebuild it to have a 955?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I didn't answer because I figured someone more knowledgeable would first. 

This may be somewhat correct

800 had all the row units the same and non staggered closing disks?

900 went to staggered closing disks?

950 decal change for the most part ?

955 row units have half with left leading, other half right lead. This was a good idea

We have a 6r30 in a 955 bought new. Also bought two of the 950 vertical wing fold like linked to previously. We made one 12 row zone till planter out of the pair. The biggest problem with the vertical fold is it is 20 feet 6" wide when folded up for transport. We made it pull type eliminating the 3pt and lift assist .

We have since got a 1200 12 row swing pivot planter to replace the one we fabbed up 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Cooter, the progression from 800 to 955 had lots of little steps.  Small changes here or there.  Differences in chain drives, the shank that held the disc, or maybe a monitor change.  Same basic row unit.  Same basic design.  Lots of the updates could be retro fitted on the older planters and many were.  They all work fine.  Best spacing in the world, no.  Seed to soil contact as good as any planter ever built.  End transport was kind of a pia if you moved alot but not the end of the world if you had good sized fields.  Mounted vertical fold was easy to transport but other than that I never liked how they handled.  The ones with the kelderman fold installed worked well except the main frames wheels had alot of weight to carry in transport.  The front fold planters had alot of tounge weight.  The vertical fold pull types werent very poplualr here for some reason.  Looks to me like a total after thought and poorly designed but I have never been around one.  I bought a second planter to help with planting soybeans and after looking at everything out there, and I mean everything, I bought a 16 row model 900 HRF.  The guys who had them around here liked them and it is a cheap bulk fill planter that should cover some acres.

bill

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, jass1660 said:

Too bad you weren't at my auction last spring. 900 12-30 hrf with 400 acres on rebuild only brought $1500?

I wanted to come up to your sale but something came up and I wasn't able too.  I remember you posted what stuff brought I was about sick when I saw that planter sold that cheap.  This will work out ok.  I rented more ground so the 16 will be better anyway.  Spent 3 times as much as I would have for yours dang it!!!!  I still will plant my corn with my 12 row deere.  Any good tips on those HRF planters?

bill

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...