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Which IH to look for, Any Input Appreciated


gwoswald

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Hello Everyone,

I have been fairly regularly following this forum for a while and have really enjoyed in insight and knowledge. I am hoping that I might be able to gain a little bit of that for myself with this post.

Quick introduction for some relevant back ground info. I live in Wisconsin and my family and I are moving up to a smallish farm in northern WI. At this point there are probably 25-30 tillable acres, with a possibility of reclaiming another 5 or 10. I made a lot of hay as a teenager, but wouldn't consider myself a farmer by any means at this point, but my wife and I are excited to get dirty and work hard at our place. Looking to the future, there is some family land that we very well may have the opportunity to work up, up to maybe 100 or so acres. I don't expect to be farming full time (metallurgist/quality engineer by trade), but my wife and I want to have some live stock at some point, and at very minimum, maintain the hay fields and likely grow some other crops (corn, wheat, etc.) as the want/need arises. So likely some tilling, planting and what not.

Currently, I have a Farmall H, but that is likely going to be the lawn mower (wood L306 will be installed in the next months), and really isn't sufficient for any serious field work, at least if I want to get it done in a shorter amount of time (likely will be farming part time, so time in the seat may be at a premium). My Dad does have a 986 that I can use if needed, but I'd prefer to have my own tractor, so I don't have to drive it back and forth (about 10 miles round trip), and because I like having my own equipment.

After doing a lot of reading on this forum and other forums, I think my choices (in order of preference) would be as follows:

1) 766 Diesel

2) 756D

3) 656D or gas

4) 560 Gas

At this point I wouldn't be planning on putting a loader on the tractor. A 766 may be overkill, but I'd rather pay once for all I need, than to get something smaller and decide it isn't sufficient. At this point I am keeping an eye open for prices and availability and getting a feel for the market and cost vs. hours, features, etc on the various models.

Any suggestions on the above? Blatant oversights? Models I should be considering based upon expected usage?

Thank you for any and all input.

If it works, there should be a couple pics at the following link:

http://i724.photobucket.com/albums/ww248/gregwoswald/Property%20Pics/IMAG1508_zpsk6vrun98.jpg

Greg

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I'd say the 766 too. It's a decent size tractor for your application. When I was younger my dad farmed 240 acres with an 806 diesel as our big tractor along with a 560 and an M. In the early 80's he bought a 1066. The 766 is a more modern version of an 806, very close in horsepower. Good luck.

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For years my 766 was my main horse doing everything from cutting, raking and baling hay to spring and fall tillage. I would do it all over again. I recently added a 756 to my herd. I grew up on on and always wanted my own. It also is a sweet machine. I don't think I could decide between the 2 so I say either one will work great for you. I also have a 656 diesel. While it does a great job at specific chores I wouldn't wanna rely on it as my main big tractor. It's not even in the same class as the 7's.

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Let's see, 25-30 acres, plus 5-10, plus maybe another 100 acres is 130 to 140 acres. Farming part time with a full time job in town, you better not rule out anything in the 1086/1066/5088 range as being too big. You will need a second tractor in the 766/786/886 size range too. And EVERYBODY needs an M/Super M on the farm too.

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welcome to the forum- looks like a nice place, and H. Off your list, I'd go with the 766 and related tractors like the 786/966. My suggestions would be along the lines of a 886 or 986, just to get the better cab

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Welcome to the forum! If that 100 acres is likely in your future then that's what you should plan for. A 766 would be great for 20 to 40 acres but it would be the minimum size to consider if you end up adding an additional 100 acres. You will end up needing larger equipment and you don't want to find that you have to buy a bigger tractor just to get started. When working part time you have to be able to do as much as you can in the time you have; i.e. evenings and weekends. So I think something along the lines of a 1066/1086, you can always use smaller implements and when the time comes that you have more land your tractor will be up to the task.

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Obviously the newer the better if you are going to use it in any serious way and dont want to tinker a lot.

With less experience that would be a consideration. Yet the newer ones are more complex and when they do go wrong are even harder to fix at home so its a judgement call.

On the H.... Thats kinda big for a lawn mower, isnt it?

Gonna leave some serious tracks in the lawn Id think.

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Having shopped iron in that area buy bigger. It's cheaper and in better shape.

I would guess you need to identify how you plan on putting up your crops. A small square baler will have differing power requirements than a large round baler or chopping hay.

Congrats on following your dream

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Thanks for the input everyone. It looks like I will be doing some more reading and looking around at some of the larger options and will be planning/budgeting accordingly.

I think we will be mostly small square baling, as it seems to have slightly better resale in this area, especially if it is quality hay that can be sold as horse hay. I kind of prefer the thought of an open station tractor for hay work, but AC would be nice to have.

With regards to the H as a mower, we've been driving it around to clean up some junk, and really havn't caused too much ruts or damage, so I think it will be fine. If it becomes a mostly full time mower, I may pull the rear wheel weights off, because we really don't have much for hills or slopes to for about tipping. There is an old C that I have my eye on for a winter restoration project someday, its been in a shed for years and would make a fun project. But for now, I want to save my cash for getting geared up with a larger tractor and associated implements.

Thanks again for all of the input so far, lots of food for thought.

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an 806 open canopy makes a NICE baling tractor...just remember the bugs and heat still apply. But, sitting in a nice a/c cab while your kids stack hay on the rack in 95 deg weather is also pretty dang...fun!

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an 806 open canopy makes a NICE baling tractor...just remember the bugs and heat still apply. But, sitting in a nice a/c cab while your kids stack hay on the rack in 95 deg weather is also pretty dang...fun!

Anything is more fun than loading flat racks on a 95 deg day.I know because I was the one on the wagon for years @ roughly 8000+ plus bales a year.

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Yep, when I was in junior high/high school, I spent a lot of time on a wagon stacking and then in the barn stacking on those bright hot summer days. Luckily it usually isn't much over the low to mid 80's.

The old 460 and New Holland baler that my Dad's uncle had just kept clunking away until the job was done. I always enjoyed the work.

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Let's see, 25-30 acres, plus 5-10, plus maybe another 100 acres is 130 to 140 acres. Farming part time with a full time job in town, you better not rule out anything in the 1086/1066/5088 range as being too big. You will need a second tractor in the 766/786/886 size range too. And EVERYBODY needs an M/Super M on the farm too.

Come on. I'm farming 550 acres with a 7120 FWD only. Just unhook a lot and a lot of strip till.

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First off welcome aboard. Dad and I farmed about 130 acres with a 1270 Case and then later traded it for a 7120 Magnum. Along with those we had a 766 D and a few H's and M's for the smaller jobs. It was our hobby farm and done when we weren't at our jobs. My question would be how far off in the future will you be possibly farming the 100 acres? If it is not in the foreseeable future then I would go with one of the 7's on your list or a comparable sized 86 series. Then if you do end up with the acreage you can add a larger tractor and up size your implements later if the need warrants and have the 7 sized tractor as your small tractor. Might help this way to keep your initial investment down until you get established.

I can see where the guys are coming from. You can pull little implements with a big tractor but you can't pull big implements with a little tractor.

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Let's see, 25-30 acres, plus 5-10, plus maybe another 100 acres is 130 to 140 acres. Farming part time with a full time job in town, you better not rule out anything in the 1086/1066/5088 range as being too big. You will need a second tractor in the 766/786/886 size range too. And EVERYBODY needs an M/Super M kon the farm too.

Come on. I'm farming 550 acres with a 7120 FWD only. Just unhook a lot and a lot of strip till.

Sounds like a personal problem! Your not much better off than the guy who farmed 320 acres across the road from the farm I grew up on with just a 560 gas, two 8N's, and a Cub Farmall. The Fords sat, Cub mowed the lawn. 560 did everything.

What's the deal with all the tractors in your signature?

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First off welcome aboard. Dad and I farmed about 130 acres with a 1270 Case and then later traded it for a 7120 Magnum. Along with those we had a 766 D and a few H's and M's for the smaller jobs. It was our hobby farm and done when we weren't at our jobs. My question would be how far off in the future will you be possibly farming the 100 acres? If it is not in the foreseeable future then I would go with one of the 7's on your list or a comparable sized 86 series. Then if you do end up with the acreage you can add a larger tractor and up size your implements later if the need warrants and have the 7 sized tractor as your small tractor. Might help this way to keep your initial investment down until you get established.

I can see where the guys are coming from. You can pull little implements with a big tractor but you can't pull big implements with a little tractor.

Budget is certainly going to be a big part of this consideration. I expect that once I have a tractor and likely even before that, I will have opportunity to help out on the family land but I probably won't be primarily working it for a number of years. I think when I have the scratch in hand, it will come down to whats available. From the discussion I won't shy away from something in the 10xx series or larger, but on the other hand, if a nice 7xx comes up, I'll be getting out the checkbook.

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I'm going to go along with the people who suggest that you broaden your horizons. Trying to find a specific model tractor, in decent condition, within hauling distance, at a price you're willing to pay is quite difficult. You can search for years. 99% of the time, the tractor is clapped out, overpriced, and/or 1000 miles away.

7's and 8's in any series command the highest prices. The perception is that the tractor is "smaller" "lighter" "handier" when it really isn't. A 766 is the exact same size as a 1466, and not appreciably lighter with empty tires and no weights. You could put 18.4x34's on a 1466 and be hard pressed to tell any difference from the 766 just driving around the yard.

Look at all of them. When you find the right one you will know it. Buy it.

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I'm going to go along with the people who suggest that you broaden your horizons. Trying to find a specific model tractor, in decent condition, within hauling distance, at a price you're willing to pay is quite difficult. You can search for years. 99% of the time, the tractor is clapped out, overpriced, and/or 1000 miles away.

7's and 8's in any series command the highest prices. The perception is that the tractor is "smaller" "lighter" "handier" when it really isn't. A 766 is the exact same size as a 1466, and not appreciably lighter with empty tires and no weights. You could put 18.4x34's on a 1466 and be hard pressed to tell any difference from the 766 just driving around the yard.

Look at all of them. When you find the right one you will know it. Buy it.

X2

Most of the smaller tractors sell way higher $ per horsepower because the weekend/ hobby farmerswill often pay any price to have exactly what model they want.

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Any of your choices seem good. I see you've got 560 on your list, so don't rule out the diesel. It has been a great tractor. What a fuel miser!

Still if a good 100hp tractor is available, don't be hesitant. There are a lot of 1066s around. Its generally easy to buy/sell too if you buy smart. Don't rule out the 06 series either.

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