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'64 TD-9 Series B Transmission Clutch Rebuild


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Hi All! Newbie to the forum.

I recently acquired this 1964 TD-9B dozer for my driveway project.

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It is not a power-shift model, so it has the manual transmission in it. I should have taken the time to lube everything and change all the fluids before I worked it - but I didn't. Big mistake. It started getting harder and harder to get into gear until it wouldn't go at all unless you shut it off. I thought it was a seized up throw-out bearing, but it was worse than that. In fact after I pulled the clutch and dismantled it the throw-out bearing is in the best shape of all.

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The broken clutch disc and the trashed pilot bearing.

I ordered a new clutch disc, return springs, and coupling shaft from Robbelyn at www.tractorparts.com. She was great to work with, and the website was VERY helpful!

I still need to source the bearings and bushings to finish the project. The part numbers stamped on the pilot bearing are completely gone. The IH part number is ST-211. Anyone have a cross for Timken?

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I also trashed the release sleeve bushings.

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I wrote down the part number that is stamped on the back of the two bushings.

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The IH part number for these bushings is 26 039 DA. Does anyone have a cross reference for these?

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And since I have it apart, I'm going to replace the throw out bearing.

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The part number stamped on the bearing is NDH 3L12, and the IH number is 972 386 R91. If there is a cross reference for Timken here I would greatly appreciate it.

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Also, the clutch has three camshafts. At the tips of these camshafts there are little roller bearings.

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Does anyone know a part number for these, or if they are even replaceable? Mine look like they have some flat spots from wear, and I would like to get some new ones if they're out there.

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I will post pictures of my progress, and share any info that I come across. I appreciate any help you guys would be willing to give with sourcing some of these parts. Thanks!

John

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  • 2 weeks later...

Okay - well in spite of the lack of helpful advice here, I proceeded to stumble my way through the project and the Bull Grader is back up and running like a BRUTE!

I took several pictures along the way, so I will walk through my process step-by-step. Hopefully this thread will help out someone else down the road that is doing the same clutch job.

First step:

TURN OFF THE BATTERY SWITCH!!

Inevitably you will have your hands down in the clutch housing and you will bump the start button with your shoulder. Not only could this severely injure your hands, it will scare the living daylights out of you. I did it twice before I got a clue. By the grace of God I didn't trash my hands. You will need to crank the engine around to get to all the bolts so just turn on the battery switch when you need to.

Next, remove all the clutch housing covers.

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Next, get a rope and tie back your steering clutch levers

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I suspended a chain hoist from a piece of uni-strut that I ran through the grab handles of my ROPS cage. Every tractor is different, but find a way to get a hoist in there to help you get that clutch out.

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Pull out the grease zerk that is attached to the main drive shaft. If you don't pull it out you could break it off trying to wrestle the clutch out.

Here is an exploded diagram of the clutch assembly:

http://www.tractorparts.com/PDFs/TD9BstdtransPARTS.pdf

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Loosen all of the bolts securing the clutch pressure plate to the flywheel, remove all but one. The one bolt will keep it in place until you are ready to hoist it out.

Remove the 3 small bolts that secure the plate to the drive coupling.

Remove the 3 nuts, lock-washers, and bolts from the drive coupling.

Run your hoist down and hook behind the adjuster ring. pull just enough tension with your hoist to keep the assembly in place while you remove the final bolt securing the pressure plate to the flywheel.

One thing I like to do is place specific bolts into a zip-lock baggie and label them with a sharpie so I remember where they go. coupling plate bolts - pressure plate bolts - power coupler bolts - etc.

Now, you are ready to gently - GENTLY - hoist the clutch out of the tractor. I used a pry bar to gently aid in getting the blasted thing out. This is actually a picture of the new clutch assembly being installed, but it also works to show the hoist hook location.

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I went into the shop at my work and found a scrap piece of angle iron. I drilled a couple of 1/2 inch holes in it that were spaced the same as across my pressure plate. I installed a couple of bolts, flat washers, and nuts, and put the contraption in a vise - like this:

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Then, I installed my clutch assembly to the bolts and bolted it down securely - not King-Kong tight, just snug.

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With the clutch assembly secured to the angle iron in the vise, I was ready to begin dis-assembly.

There are 3 sets of return springs that the service manual wants you to remove the "x" washer and dis-assemble. Mine looked and felt good, so I just put a couple pieces of flat stock, some thick spacer washers, and compressed them with a big C clamp. Having the tension relieved will make it much easier to remove the adjustment ring.

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I used a brass drift punch to avoid damaging the adjustment ring. the brass is soft enough that it won't mushroom the impact areas of the ring. After it loosened up some, I was able to use a small pry bar until I could unscrew it completely by hand.

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I removed the adjusting ring and the adjusting ring plate. This is a picture of the assembly getting ready to go back together, but it works for this illustration too. There are 3 camshafts, and the release (throw-out) bearing assembly.

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Be very careful when you remove the camshafts. There are 2 small roller bearings in each tip of each individual camshaft - 12 total. If they are worn they will probably fall out onto the floor and you will spend some frustrating time scouring the area until you find them.

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Here is a picture of the bare pressure plate all cleaned up with solvent and ready to go back together.

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I put a small amount of grease in each of the camshaft blocks.

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I couldn't find any replacement bearings for the camshafts, so I got creative. To prevent the little roller bearing from falling out of the shaft, I peened the ends slightly with a hammer. I don't know if this was the right move, but I know that it kept the little buggers in there. The first picture shows before the hammer, and the second shows a little tighter fit after. Sorry for the blurry pics.

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I filled the camshafts with some good grease, installed them into the blocks on the pressure plate and worked them around.

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Time to start on the new release (throw-out) bearing. The new bearing is a Koyo 6012ZZC3. It comes with tin dust seals on both sides, so you will have to CAREFULLY peel one side out.

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I filled the bearing with grease, slid it onto the release sleeve, and installed the snap ring.

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I filled the bearing carrier with a little grease.

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Be very careful when you are installing the snap ring that secures the carrier. you could slip and damage the tin dust seal of the release bearing.

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Here is a picture of the bronze release sleeve bushing. I took the new clutch shaft and the release sleeve assembly to the local machinist, and he made me this bushing. He drilled 3 holes into it to allow for greasing. The original 2-piece bushings are no longer available. It cost me 100 bucks to have the bushing made.

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I put together the camshafts and the release bearing assembly and put them in the pressure plate. Then I was ready to install the adjusting plate and ring. I applied a liberal coat of copper anti-seize to the threads of the ring.

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I installed the plate and screwed the ring down by hand until it was tight. Then I used the brass drift punch to tighten the assembly down to where I felt it needed to be. Final adjustments are done after the assembly is installed into the tractor.

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After the adjusting ring was snug, I went through and wiped away all the excess grease and anti-seize compound so it didn't get on the friction disc or clutch brake.

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