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Radial Tires, How good are they?


chadd

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I have seen some charge $1 per gallon to pump fluid.... that was over ten years ago

We have went completely away from tubes.... unless absolutely necessary, the failure rate has been too high for us

Did they fail by twisting the stem off, or chafing through? I was wondering how well the tube would work at the low pressures used on radials.
I have not have a tube last 1/4 the life of any tire that I have bought in the last 15 years. I have had 95+% of my tubeless have 0% downtime for a flat. Why pay extra for a tube when it causes me more trouble. IF I am going to run ballast it would only be beet juice / rim guard. Without buying any tubes I have saved money even though I replaced two or three sets of rims that had bad calcium damage and would leak at the bead
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IMHO its what type of tube they use and for what tire. Firestone radials are really rough on the inside and the only good luck I have had with tubing them was to use natural rubber tubes. They are more pliable than butyl rubber tubes, also haven't had the high failure rate as the butyl rubber tubes. the only downsides to the natural rubber tubes is the price and if they're full of fluid and you puncture it they pretty much explode and are not repairable.

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It cost me $102 for the pair of tubes in my H 11.2-38. I would hate to think what tubes for our working tractors would cost ( mostly 18/46 duals and 16.9/30) We spent between 30-50,000 last year on new rubber , no tubes included

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I have both bias and radials. The radials pull and ride better than bias tires. I also think they will last more miles. However they do not hold up to time (exposure) as good as bias tires. I have many bias tires that are 70s vintage that still hold air and do their job while a set of 18.4-38 R2 Goodyear radials I bought back in the 90s are dieing from cracks... One has already failed...

So if I am going to use the tire alot I buy a radial. If I am going to use it a little or some I buy a Bias.

Thx-Ace

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I have both bias and radials. The radials pull and ride better than bias tires. I also think they will last more miles. However they do not hold up to time (exposure) as good as bias tires. I have many bias tires that are 70s vintage that still hold air and do their job while a set of 18.4-38 R2 Goodyear radials I bought back in the 90s are dieing from cracks... One has already failed...

So if I am going to use the tire alot I buy a radial. If I am going to use it a little or some I buy a Bias.

Thx-Ace

When it comes to Goodyear , Armstrong , and Titan I have had failure with all 3 before they are half wore out usually. Firestone have worked out great , Michelin is on the not sure yet list yet as our oldest set is 2 1/2 years old. Our Class chopper had Goodyear on since new ('02) and we replaced last fall. I can't afford the downtime they gave us. The 800/65r32s on the chopper had 65% tread left yet but they had cracks between each tread . Bad enough to wear through the tubes we tried to extend the life with within a year. This had been a yearly occurrence and I had enough.

Just looked they were Goodyear Super traction radials . Ones on our 8050AC we bought new in '87 were Armstrong hi power lug radials , forget what the name was on the titans on the 1066H

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