Jump to content

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

farmboy986

International 9300 semi tractor

Recommended Posts

Im looking at buying a 1998 International 9300 semi tractor and just wondering what anyone had to say about it (good or bad). Its got a cat engine, and a 13 speed transmission. Not quite sure on the miles on it. It has a 255 inch wheel base and a 72 inch sleeper on it. And it has a 12,000 pound front axel which ive been told makes it very rough riding, but oh well I guess. Thanks for anything you may shed on this topic!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We'll assume it's a 3406 in-line 6 Cat, probably 400 or 425 HP. I suspect it's got a huge amount of miles, but with some work and a few parts can go many many more miles. Generally considered the best engine IH used in those trucks. Make sure it's been well maintained.

I hope it has air ride rear suspension. If it has Hendrickson or Reyco spring suspension it will ride rough. The 12,000# frt axle is almost required to gross 80,000#, you wouldn't want anything else. I've never been in an IH truck that rode smooth, especially across I-80 across Illinois but that's not really the truck's fault. The long wheelbase of that truck will make it ride much smoother than anything I ever drove.

Check it out closer, miles, service records, general condition, and how clean it is inside and out tells a lot about how the truck was maintained. Make sure it's not a rebuilt wreck. They can be good or very bad depending on who does them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I started driving 9300 series back in '89 when I began driving milk truck. They are a heavy haul truck, unlike a Volvo, or Freightliner. I have a '87 and a '89. I'm partial to the mechanical 855s myself, but as Dr. Evil said, it ALL depends on past maintenance. They are simple to work on, especially if your doing a overhead. Open the hood and it's all out in the open.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What are you planning on using it for? If its farm use, it would probably be alright to look at a truck that old, anything else I would look newer. We have a 97 and 98 Pete 379 and little things just keep going out, but they are for local farm use only. Old cat engines are great engines, that's all we ran in our Pete's until they went with Cummins in new trucks.

Farm use your gonna want to take bunk off and shorten the frame IMO, thats 7500-10000 bucks right there. Older trucks will nickel and dime you every time no matter what anyone tells you. But it's what you plan to do with it determines whether its a good fit for you.

The International 9300 with Cat engine is a good running horse though. 12000 front axle is pretty much standard. It will be rough riding no matter how you cut it, its a 17 year old truck with the goodie all ran out of it. Just my experience and thoughts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Could have a c13 cat or a 3406 e or c15 . Cat engines of that age are good but need maintenance. Common problems are injectors ,camshafts ,valves dropping out of the head, and sleeves moving or pitting. Don't let that scare you though but if they need any work parts are high and labor is high. It is probably in the mid 20,000 range to have on overhauled with cat parts now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the advice, its got a cat 3406e engine in it. They said that the engine and transmission were replace not long ago but they DO NOT have any paperwork for the replacements. I plan on buying a grain trailer and a drop-deck flatbed to haul some tractors on. I'm looking into doing some longer hauls with it depending on where I can find jobs I guess. I really don't plan on using it to haul out of the field that much which is probably a good thing with the long wheel base and large sleeper. Maybe this truck might be a little old to trust to go that far, I really don't know so that's why I'm asking the experts. Thanks again!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If they can't show paperwork on an overhaul or transmission I suggest looking elsewhere. That could be 5-10 years ago, think how fast time gets away from you. My 2 cents

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My 95 9300 is also 255",72" sleeper,rides very nice.N-14 Cummins,AR suspension,AR cab,AR seat.

IMG-20120429-000211.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The 3406e is a good engine plenty of power. But they get expensive. I think you can go through a n14 for around 12 or 14000. A cat will get into the 20s.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm running a 1998 IH 9400 N-14 cummins, 13 speed , I have 1,402,650 miles on the truck tranny and rear ends have never been out . I plan on keeping on running the truck. I suggest you see if you can talk to the last owner . My mechanics tell me to keep what i'v got, lot fewer problems than newer than 2003 trucks . There is a reason you are seeing more old cab overs and older trucks being reconditioned or used for glider kits. EMISSIONS!!!!!! Just my two cents worth John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm running a 1998 IH 9400 N-14 cummins, 13 speed , I have 1,402,650 miles on the truck tranny and rear ends have never been out . I plan on keeping on running the truck. I suggest you see if you can talk to the last owner . My mechanics tell me to keep what i'v got, lot fewer problems than newer than 2003 trucks . There is a reason you are seeing more old cab overs and older trucks being reconditioned or used for glider kits. EMISSIONS!!!!!! Just my two cents worth John

Most definitely true.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The 3406e is a good engine plenty of power. But they get expensive. I think you can go through a n14 for around 12 or 14000. A cat will get into the 20s.

I ran into my boss a while back I had when I drove milk truck. Talked a bit. He's had that profession since the early '70s. He told me the engine that he's had the best luck with out of all those years is the Big cam, and N14, and he's had and tried them all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been trucking around North America hauling specialized since the 60's.Bought my first truck and trailer in 1974,and I'm still at it.Have owned all Internationals,with different engines.The best I've ever owned is the N-14.Ton's of power,trouble free,and will start easily in the coldest weather.To bad the govt won't let them use them anymore.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Doug - What you got on the trailer? Looks like a space capsule and it looks like it says Nasa on the tarp.

jerry

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just bought a 1985 IH 9370 with a 350 cummins, 13 speed, air ride and day cab. I will put less than 5000 miles a year hauling grain and occasionally farm equipment for my farm. It should last me a long time if I don't do something stupid. Thx-Ace

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Doug - What you got on the trailer? Looks like a space capsule and it looks like it says Nasa on the tarp.

jerry

Correct,17' wide Orion Spaace Capsule.Hauling it in and out of the D.C. Convention Center last year.

717055188_2561394304_0.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My 95 9300 is also 255",72" sleeper,rides very nice.N-14 Cummins,AR suspension,AR cab,AR seat.

IMG-20120429-000211.jpg

Ok......cool picture!!!! I would to talk to the DRIVER as well. He'll know everything. 255" is the hot lenth here for a farm truck. Perfect for a 22-24' silage box/manure spreader[or tank]. Why dont you get me the contact info and I'll talk to them .... ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I ran about a dozen 9300s until Texas started enforcing weight laws. We haul bulk commodities and it is almost impossible to get the 12,000 on the steering axle. And I experienced more steering axle tire wear because if your front end is light, you have 8 tires wanting to go straight and two trying to turn. I like the looks of 9300s.

My personal truck that I used to haul junk trucks that I bought was a 9300 with a Celect+460 engine. https://plus.google.com/photos/108197707187186692269/albums/5815251523948246017/5815250946380424210?authkey=CMys8avQ7IjJswE&pid=5815250946380424210&oid=108197707187186692269

It was a tough decision to make, but I run all set back axles now with ISM Cummins. They weigh under 23,000 with a Cornhusker trailer

https://plus.google.com/photos/108197707187186692269/albums/6117441297529047889/6117441322008277794?pid=6117441322008277794&oid=108197707187186692269

get 6 miles to the gallon grossing 84,000 one way and go about 800,000 between overhauls. None of my trucks are newer than 2003 and I have no EGR.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Doug - What you got on the trailer? Looks like a space capsule and it looks like it says Nasa on the tarp.

jerry

Correct,17' wide Orion Spaace Capsule.Hauling it in and out of the D.C. Convention Center last year.

717055188_2561394304_0.jpg

Wasn't Orion supposed to take us back to the moon? Program cancelled by our POTUS.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I ran about a dozen 9300s until Texas started enforcing weight laws. We haul bulk commodities and it is almost impossible to get the 12,000 on the steering axle. And I experienced more steering axle tire wear because if your front end is light, you have 8 tires wanting to go straight and two trying to turn. I like the looks of 9300s.

My personal truck that I used to haul junk trucks that I bought was a 9300 with a Celect+460 engine. https://plus.google.com/photos/108197707187186692269/albums/5815251523948246017/5815250946380424210?authkey=CMys8avQ7IjJswE&pid=5815250946380424210&oid=108197707187186692269

It was a tough decision to make, but I run all set back axles now with ISM Cummins. They weigh under 23,000 with a Cornhusker trailer

https://plus.google.com/photos/108197707187186692269/albums/6117441297529047889/6117441322008277794?pid=6117441322008277794&oid=108197707187186692269

get 6 miles to the gallon grossing 84,000 one way and go about 800,000 between overhauls. None of my trucks are newer than 2003 and I have no EGR.

Just wondering,did you ever have a 9300 like mine with the big tanks to the front right behind the steer axle?One of the reasons I bought this truck was the same issue with my 4300's,couldn't get enough weight on the steer.The 9300 with the tanks forward,pretty much solved that problem.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The 9300 that I personally drove had 2 150 gallon tanks. When I wasn't driving it myself, it was pulling a dry van hauling bagged feed drop and hook. The weight slip we had was with Purina's yard trucks and we were never weighed. My 9300 day cabs only had a single 100 gallon tank on the passenger side and a step battery box for the driver with only 2 batteries. With the 5th wheel up as far as we could go without hitting the dollies on Cornhusker grain trailers we never were able to get 12k on the steering axle. I had a couple of 4300 of early 80 vintage, but we were still running 4070B cabovers at the time. The daycab 9300 put about the same weight on the steering axle as the 4300. The 4300 cab was about the same, but it sat down lower making everything harder to get to and the wiring wasn't very good. Here is a picture of what our Cornhuskers look like when I pick them up at the factory.

https://plus.google.com/108197707187186692269/posts/Ro5PAmsxh9k?pid=6121471634601633282&oid=108197707187186692269

The only way I can axle with them is with a set back axle and the 5th wheel as far as I can go and clear the dollies. With an ISM engine, 100 gallons of fuel and only 2 batteries, I have to be able to get weight from the trailer to the 5th wheel. And I have found steer tires to last a lot longer loaded heavy. It only stands to reason because you have 8 tires trying to go straight and 2 trying to turn. The 9300 was a very good truck. In fact an 85 model with a BCIII400 that I sold to a local dirt contractor about 15 years ago is still in daily service. And he says all he does is put in fuel ever so often. But he loads by the bucket full and just runs around close to town. All of my 9300s had either BCIII or N14 in them which is almost 900 lbs more than an ISM. I think a Cat weighs even more. Cummins have done me a good job for almost 50 years and I have kind of evolved with them from the NH220 days. I don't want to offend Cat people, because I'm sure they feel the same way about Cats. But some of the repair bills I have seen on Cats scare me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've never been in an IH truck that rode smooth, especially across I-80 across Illinois but that's not really the truck's fault. .

X2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've never been in an IH truck that rode smooth, especially across I-80 across Illinois but that's not really the truck's fault. .

X2

30 years ago there was a bad spot on I-280 just west of downtown Milan on the east bound lanes. Illinois DOT did their normal repair. Put up a "BUMP" sign right next to the crater. Some comedian added a hand written sign below it that said, "NEXT 165 MILES" . It was fun listening to people on the CB laughing about that sign.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've never been in an IH truck that rode smooth, especially across I-80 across Illinois but that's not really the truck's fault. .

X2

30 years ago there was a bad spot on I-280 just west of downtown Milan on the east bound lanes. Illinois DOT did their normal repair. Put up a "BUMP" sign right next to the crater. Some comedian added a hand written sign below it that said, "NEXT 165 MILES" . It was fun listening to people on the CB laughing about that sign.

That stretch is pretty good now - the worst part I run over weekly is the stretch when you go westbound off 280 on I-80 some of them spots near the Rt. 6 exit are pretty bad in a empty '91 L9000 boom truck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your boom truck have rear leaf springs? The ready-mix trucks I drove for Edwards in Geneseo had Hendrickson SQHD rear suspensions, four big rubber bisquits, no springs. When empty they were a treat running on some of the bad two lane state roads. Guy I drove with lost a unloading chute one day driving over a bridge. Unfortunately he was meeting a coffee buddy of Mr. Edwards, chute ended up on the passenger side of the seat by way of the windshield! With no springs, on some bridges you could get all eight rear wheels 8-10 inches off the ground.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...