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Brady Boy

IH Cab-Over Spotted in Spokane

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No idea what year, or anything about it, but a small carnival was set up on the north end of Spokane, and I noticed this.

BK

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Another angle. Can't be many of these around anymore.

BK

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Last International CO for the US was built in May, 2000 when the set-back axle 9800 was discontinued and I believe the 9600 like this was dropped earlier.

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Ewwww Single axle crackerbox cab..... bet it's got a V6 Detroit diesel under the doghouse and a 9-spd Road-Ranger.

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If I was a bettin man Id say a L-10 Cummins!

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Also that Converter gear Looks Like a "Jifflock". Also the rear frame looks bobbed so It may be that. If so thats rare. It is a system that allows the unit to be a tandem that pulls 45 plus trailers then remove the converter gear and pull doubles as a single axle.

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I hadn't noticed before the single/doubles statement but it certainly has two fifth wheels. And given the area, likely not a 9 speed Detroit.

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Me thinks the second axle and 5th wheel is just a dolly for the second trailer, nothing "special", just hooked to a pintle hitch on the tractor. Seen UPS do it hundreds of times.

The 6V-92 TTA was good for 307 net hp, coupled to a nine speed Road-Ranger in a tandem tractor was a really common power train. The company I drove for had dozens of them.

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Looks like a non-slider fifth wheel on tractor. Can't be jiff lock, no place for the tractor fifth wheel to go.

Dennis

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Is it that flat around those parts? Most of what I have seen was 350 rated, although the UPS guys did seem to drive some dogs back in the day. I saw mostly triples but UPS boxes can't be all that heavy. Lots of mountain grades though. The circus guys haul kinda fluffy too so guess it could be just bout anything under the hump.

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Lot of those still going up and down the road here in the Midwest. Farmers like them because they are cheap but dependable. Definitely not for the older guys with bad knees.

jerry

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Nice Brady, the carnival crews who do our local fair always have a few COE IHs. Cheap and simple, like most carnies! M, the 9 sp is for sure the most common trans in older trucks I have seen W of the Cascades. That Carnival is from Portland. The coast is flat-ish. Then after going over the Cascades there are a few passes but generally pretty level as well. After the ID Border things get more interesting grade wise. Now most rigs newer than late 80s seem to have 13 sp. RR trans. I know guys with 450hp and 9sp. Old guy said one that if you got enough power you dont need to shift!

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In the 70s a guy running 450 was king of the road in the southwest, although they weren't that common. I think heating on long grades was too much an issue? I remember the standard speed upgrade for a military 5 ton was 12 to 13 mph. A 350 Cummins w 13 was about 18 mph, and a 450 Detroit would roar past all us low lifes. But you would often see them at the top of the pass.

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Company I drove for had one hi powered TranStar, think it was about a '78 or '79 vintage. Had 8v92 TTA Detroit, rated 430 HP, and a 9-SPD Road - Ranger. Not sure what gears it had but the first time I drove it I had it wound up to 75 mph in about three miles grossing about 70,000#. That was about terminal velocity too. Year or so later they tuned it down to 350-375 HP to try to get better mpg, didn't work... Still got 3-1/2 mpg.

The trucks I normally ran, '79 White RoadBoss II had 320 HP 903 Cummins, 6-speed Spicer trans, 4.44 gears and governed to 2500 rpm & 67 mph. Needed more gears! 9-speed RR would have been O-K, 10 SPD would have been better. They did O-K in the Midwest, but would NOT have liked the hills and mountains getting to either coast.

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Wow, six speed was unheard of in the southwest back in the day.

I ran a 72(?) Cummins Freightliner rental than pegged at 67. 13 RR. No steering or A/C and it was a beater but pulled like no tomorrow. Stoutest truck I ever got to drive. With a mild load would drop to ~60 and then that pryo would climb... Between the rattles and noise and sloppy steering it wore you out by the end of the day.

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The RoadBoss's had manual steering too. Company had a couple Road Commanders that had more options and fancier cab trim, plus power steering. The steering wheels in them were about 16 inches in diameter. The wheels in the RoadBoss's were about THIRTY inches, my knuckles barely missed the windshield and side windows. Company had a couple S2200's that had P/S.

The only thing that made the six-speeds work in the RoadBoss's was the 903 Cummins. They had a speed range from 1700 to 2500 and would still pull as low as 1400. An auxillary box like a Brownie would have been nice to split each gear 2-3 times. Low gear was a creeper I only used to slide tandems or 5th wheels. The company that was JD's captive contract carrier at the time ordered them out, our company bought 5 or 6 of them that had sat on the lot 2-1/2 years. And I'd see one a local farmer bought sometimes. Plus there were two other trucking co's that had lots of RoadBoss's the same vintage. My Dad put close to half a million miles on a RoadBoss

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