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hagan

cost of Hy Tran oil

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I see that hy tran is knocking on $80 for 5 gallons and I need to fill my barrel since there is not much in it.

Have been pricing oil and $79 for hy tran-- $53 for NAPA oil--$50 for O Riley oil premium tractor fluid and $36 for WalMart tractor fluid.

I am toying around the best thing to do but I have never recalled having the oil be the fault of the breakdown. 2 yrs ago I purchased a barrel at NAPA as CaseIH was not open and I was out on a Saturday. The only problem I have had in the past 2 years is we had the main shaft twist off on the 7140 that runs everything and the 7110 had a shifting check valve go bad. everything else has ran fine but these are both 10,000 hour tractors and I expect some repairs on them.

What would you do? This oil is to be used only to add oil when some is lost and when I do change hy tran I go to caseih and use hy tran.

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Used to use hy-tran or Donax TD, no issues with either. Started using cheap stuff from farm supply stores, still no failures but stuff took longer to get moving good in winter. When I got 7250 went back to hy-tran. Won't go back to other oils, annually change magnum and reuse that oil in older leaky tractors. Looks like new out of magnum and several neighbors do it also. Use 2 barrels a year, got one in December. 55 gallon was $734 in my container, that was the 1st time I got the new hy-tran. Don't even remember what it's called.

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Also at my dealer last check it was nearly $2 gallon cheaper in my barrel.

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The new HY-TRAN is "HI-TRAN ULTRACTION". It is a nearly complete reformulation of the original HY-TRAN in that it is now multi viscosity (10W-30)

and it is completely reverse compatible with all tractors using HY-TRAN (it is also "over-engineered" for JD applications).

I recommend HY-TRAN over generic hydraulic fluids because HY-TRAN can and does absorb water that migrates into the hydraulic system through temperature change and especially platform leaks on older open station tractors. Most generic fluids do not offer this protection and therefore will not protect against rust and corrosion.

You may save $100, $150, or $200 dollars on oil by purchasing generic brands, but you could easily loose many times that on repair costs.

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We've been using the $35 a bucket cheapo hy-tran stuff from TSC for as long as I can remember in everything and have yet to ever have a fluid related breakdown.

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call;ed the dealer the other day still about 12.50 in bulk delivery

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We have been using the cheaper fluid usually traveller universal fluid from TSC in ih combine and tractors as well as kubota utility tractors for years instead of the high priced hytran or UDT for the kubota. So far I have not had any problems related to oil.

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just picked up 55 gal of hy-tran in bulk.

paid $11.10/gal. 55 gal drum was $724.

price was during the dealers parts celebration.

I will continue to use it vs non oem.

jmho

Duane

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As the others have said it might be expensive, but I don't have the extra $ laying around for a major transmission or rearend repair, so I will keep buying it for now!

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Use universal Mobil 424. Goes in any color. Cost is under $10 in 55's.

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Got the annual oil sale flyer from our local CNH dealer last week.

$13.08/gal for bulk Hytran, (.42ยข off)

Some days a guy has just got to laugh.

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Hytran is a good oil and is the only thing for a Hydrostatic drie. However the ability to mix with water has both good and bad issues. Ever had the tractor not move due to freezing up of the mixture. It has happened. The most common issue is myysterious hydraulic system shutdowns only to have miraculous recovery by the time a tecnician gets to it. Following is the sequence.

Water gets inside and mixes with the oil every day due to sweating from daytime to night time temp. changes and in high humidity this can be a lot of moisture.

The tractor hydraulics perform well until it gets HOT.

Then suddenly the hydraulics quit.

Usually within minutes or less the hydraulics come back to life only to repeat shortly if the unit is being worked.

WATER mixes with the hytran and causes additive seperation that gets in and plugs the pores in the filter paper which results in a lower than atmospheric pressure condition at the area between the pump and the filter'.

The water in the mixture explodes the same as releasing the radiator cap on a car.

This drives the oil back up the suction tube away rom the pump until the oil cools by 1 degree and I have ran flo rater tests to verify this. When a tractor sits on a dealers lot for a year or more the first thing I have done is a complete change of oil and filters and I want to be standing there when the do it because ther is no discoloration of the oil at this stage.

If you have the tractor sitting for three monthes, Before you start it take the lowest drain plug in the bottom of the tractor and a drain pan and JUST loosen the plug until you can rock it and you will see water trikle out leave it trikle until it turns into an oil drip.
BE CAREFUL or you will get a bath if you turn the plug to the last thread in the housing..

The sitting time of the tractor is important due to the time it takes for water to seprate from the hytran.

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I have to agree on the question of weather an oil holding onto part of the water is a good or bad idea.

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I am the thinking the same Pete.

I prefer to pull a plug and drain water out on equipment that has sat for a while.

Also it is easier to diagnose a problem if you have an idea the amount of condensation you are dealing with.

Hytran does not get used in everything because of water absorption.

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The most important thing you can do with your hydraulic fluid is to keep it full. When you run your tractor low you damage it.

One of the biggest problems with the 06 through 86 tractor is low hyd fluid. Those tractors have dipsticks that are too long and the tractor will function way to low on oil.

An old factory trained IH mechanic I used to know told me to cut my hyd dipstick off just below the full mark.

Thx-Ace

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I would only use the real stuff. Read Ken Updikes article Red Power and know why. Don`t remember which issue but very good. It ain`t worth the repairs to not use HyTran.

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There is a service bulletin dealing with cutting the dipstick of on the 86 series tractors. They were to be cut off at the mark below the full mark so the only indication on the stick was the word full. Also when the oil is at the full mark the level should be half way up on the PTO shaft.

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Yes, we need to cut the dipsticks off just below full. The darn things are so long you can still see oil when it is half empty on many tractors! Why did IH put a 5 gal low mark on the stick??? I believe that has been the cause of many problems in these tractors. Thx-Ace

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I had the top cover with the lift arms off when I added oil to my 806. Book says 17 gallons for the 806 and 25 for the 1486; I wasn't sure why they wouldn't all be the same. My dipstick on the 806 was another 1 1/2" longer than the one on the 1456, again I'm not sure why lubrication was less important on one tractor than another. When I added 25 gallons it would touch the bottom of the ring gear, which I thought was a good idea. Then I made new markings on the dipstick to reflect the additional oil.

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I had the top cover with the lift arms off when I added oil to my 806. Book says 17 gallons for the 806 and 25 for the 1486; I wasn't sure why they wouldn't all be the same. My dipstick on the 806 was another 1 1/2" longer than the one on the 1456, again I'm not sure why lubrication was less important on one tractor than another. When I added 25 gallons it would touch the bottom of the ring gear, which I thought was a good idea. Then I made new markings on the dipstick to reflect the additional oil.

Thats a interesting point you bring up about putting 25 gal. in your 1486, i think most of us do run a extra 5 gal. in most all of our tractors, but are the internal capacity's different between the models that appear to shar the same case designe ?

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Book says 17 gallons for the 806 and 25 for the 1486; I wasn't sure why they wouldn't all be the same.

The 806 final drive capacity was originally kept separate from the rear end oil because it had it's own oil. I believe 5 quarts on each side. 86 series it all ran together.

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Here its $14/gal. We use it in everything. Habit? But never in 40 years have we had a hydraulic related failure. But we also only run 15/40 in every red tractor for 20 years and never even had a valve cover off. 16000, 7000, 8000, hours on the pre-85 IHs.

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My Grandfather always told me You get what you pay for .......... ;)

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Book says 17 gallons for the 806 and 25 for the 1486; I wasn't sure why they wouldn't all be the same.

The 806 final drive capacity was originally kept separate from the rear end oil because it had it's own oil. I believe 5 quarts on each side. 86 series it all ran together.

The 56 series is when that started. I knocked the soft plugs out of the bearings and drilled holes in the lower inner 806 casting to allow clean oil to circulate. But, that still doesn't answer the question of why if they are all the same housings would they differ so greatly in the recommend oil capacity.

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