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TroyDairy

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That's a boat load of junk. Some of their chems might be temp dependent for application and why they start early and stop. Just bought a flat a little west of Mt Vernon the other day--they are really good this year, must be the accumulation. Maybe my hair will grow back...

We put lime-sulfur on early after pruning for dormant soon as it's dry enough to get up the hills, then stylet oil+borax+micro nutrients, then sulphur+micros, another stylet+micros, Quintec, Pristine and then alternate the last two until it gets and stays into the 90-100 temps--all for powdery mildew. Guess we'll be on seven if it cools down again. A couple years ago we got caught pretty good with mildew and lost a bunch. May not sound like much but it's all hand labor aside from the mowing and spraying, gets pretty expensive per acre.

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4 hours ago, Bleedinred said:

That's a boat load of junk. Some of their chems might be temp dependent for application and why they start early and stop. Just bought a flat a little west of Mt Vernon the other day--they are really good this year, must be the accumulation. Maybe my hair will grow back...

We put lime-sulfur on early after pruning for dormant soon as it's dry enough to get up the hills, then stylet oil+borax+micro nutrients, then sulphur+micros, another stylet+micros, Quintec, Pristine and then alternate the last two until it gets and stays into the 90-100 temps--all for powdery mildew. Guess we'll be on seven if it cools down again. A couple years ago we got caught pretty good with mildew and lost a bunch. May not sound like much but it's all hand labor aside from the mowing and spraying, gets pretty expensive per acre.

I know a lot of times they'll apply at 1 in the morning that I don't know about my buddy said because the wind they want no air movement at all and here it's usually Breezy every afternoon

and I get grapes and mildew my friend works for Yakima fruit and consults on the side they're finicky buggers here they worry about mold

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Well it was Fair week....min sleep..

Girls did alright.  Top 5 in fit n show each and mid pack in type with their Dec calves.  But we all had good time.  Whole club helped each other and cheered each kid on.  Lotsa jokes...few pranks...city kids petting animals.  5 fresh cows in the maternity pen display.  Of course had to pull 1 calf😁.  Was kinda warm and attendance seemed soft but Saturday was a zoo!.

Got some manure pumped even!  

We use loader to quick clean barns each morning.  Hand pitch straw in to lane and use little tractoe and payloader to load trucks.  Start at 5am....was 630ish here 

Ma with the little one for PeeWee show Saturday.   

All calfs in same class from our club...iirc one class was 15 and 7 were from Dairyland 4h!

Was sad...we had about 15 20 hd short in the dairy area vs last year.  Used to have to turn animals away.

KW NW had 3 trucks..all autos!

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Troy, You must have been frazzled from the fair duty.  My wife was at the fair Saturday afternoon with her 2 nieces going on the rides she said passed you and said "Hi" to you and you gave her the "look" with no words. How rude!! 😎

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Auto shift is the standard trans for all manufacturers now, manual trans is a pay up option....

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On 8/14/2019 at 12:51 PM, TroyDairy said:

The berry guys frankly spray about every four days to six days all summer and then they even spray some dormant type stuff and copper from late January to October I bet they have to spray for the moth at least 20 times a season for example the other day they were spraying on Friday the Blueberry Field below me then they sprayed Monday morning part of it then they picked we think the other part of it Tuesday then they sprayed Thursday or Wednesday then they sprayed Saturday and then they just sprayed about an hour ago it is staggering and kind of creepy how much chemical they pour on blueberries(and rasp) and I think i fmost of their buyers knew there would be issues

Powdery mildew doesn't affect blueberries. They spray for mummy berry and a fungus or two but mostly for bugs. My dad lived across the street from berry farm near Cloverdale BC ( maybe 12 miles from Troy) the owner was quite proud that he was spraying 16 different chemicals.

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8 hours ago, 806 man said:

Troy, You must have been frazzled from the fair duty.  My wife was at the fair Saturday afternoon with her 2 nieces going on the rides she said passed you and said "Hi" to you and you gave her the "look" with no words. How rude!! 😎

Crap!  Tell J sorry!  By saturday we all are in "It's ALLLLmost done" zone!  Saturday was a zoo also, really really busy vs rest of week.  Scott B son (9) got several blue ribbons for 4H gardens.....several diff potatoes he entered!  Who would of thought?!😃

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7 hours ago, chip man said:

Powdery mildew doesn't affect blueberries. They spray for mummy berry and a fungus or two but mostly for bugs. My dad lived across the street from berry farm near Cloverdale BC ( maybe 12 miles from Troy) the owner was quite proud that he was spraying 16 different chemicals.

I was kinda rethinking that.  Copper is what they use for fungus I know.  The spray is a greenish mist.  And yes they spray for bugs ALOT.  Now with that new Moth it's weekly+++.  Honestly, i aint a anti-spray type but.... we dont eat [glean] any raspberries or blue berries off the bush .  One smaller farm {like 200 acres} neighbor lets the girls pick few # every year for winter snacks but he kinda leaves his blues alone in the corner of a rasp field on wet ground.  But the big guy sprays at least every 5 days.   An sometimes 4.  Its incredible what they must spend in chem cost.  Main thing is each product has a diff time to 'stay out' an since we cant keep track of how many times the chopper or tractor goes we just avoid them.  Whats puzzling is we are working on barn 2 weeks ago and field 1/4 mile away is sprayed with chopper.  We can smell it so much it's kinda nauseating.  Wind blowing 15 mph apx.  Lets see if I use a big gun with manure and a 15 mph wind blows mist on a berry field how long till I get phone calls then attorney letters?  I get it you need to protect the crop you grew but I just don't see how spraying in wind is a best management practice.  But on a positive since we are surrounded by em we rarely see mosquitoes now and the fly pop is quite low as well... ;)

My buddy a few years ago was shocked at the canes on my road.  He is from dryland country so whole new world.  Look for the Abbotsford Airport on Google Earth.  All you see that look like rows to the W, E, and S are rasp and blueberries.  We are S 1.5 miles apx as crow flies. 

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well troy our sorghum sudan experiment for an emergency crop didn't go as well as the corn you were concerned with, this was planted on former hay ground, now we are going to need an emergency crop to replace the emergency crop. it looked decent but it must of been just to wet this past 2 ,months, the crop that really looks good is millet that guys planted, well theres always next year.

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I have never seen helicopters spraying blueberries just tractors, also don't know about moth. New pest? I thought you were closer to Aldergrove border crossing. I live on city lot and have 26 blueberry plants in back yard, don't spray anything but have had significant loss of berries to Asian fruit fly.

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1 hour ago, chip man said:

I have never seen helicopters spraying blueberries just tractors, also don't know about moth. New pest? I thought you were closer to Aldergrove border crossing. I live on city lot and have 26 blueberry plants in back yard, don't spray anything but have had significant loss of berries to Asian fruit fly.

Yep 1/2 way between Lynden and Sumas crossings.  Spotted winged drophopha (sp) moth is new bug from 4 5 years ago.  Assumed it came in some asian fruit import.  FROM what little I know about berries!!  May be asian fly is same thing?   Blackberries are kinda gross now.....fill a bowl and put some water in.  Stick in fridge and by morning the water is solid layer of dead larvae floating.

Soon as fruits on the spray is with choppers.  They dont wanna knock fruit off with tractors

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Yes, Spotted Wing Drosophila. Agriculture B.C. is calling it a fruit fly. I cut down my cherry tree as they would infest that first then move to the berries.

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1 hour ago, chip man said:

Yes, Spotted Wing Drosophila. Agriculture B.C. is calling it a fruit fly. I cut down my cherry tree as they would infest that first then move to the berries.

So old fruit guys say it is so bad of bug it may change the industry since its so tough.  Already 4 5 years into it a fieldman said some sprays are not working.   But I don't know any real details.

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9 hours ago, chip man said:

Yes, Spotted Wing Drosophila. Agriculture B.C. is calling it a fruit fly. I cut down my cherry tree as they would infest that first then move to the berries.

we have it here, too. if you don't spray (organic), puts a quick end to blueberry season when they arrive, usually early-mid August.

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Went to dump.  Thats a cardboard recyle truck.  They recycle 0 cardboard.  China wont take it since too much $ to process.  Kinda sad and makes you chuckle bit.  

Got hfrs tue.  Great gravel roads....and turbo let out a code it isnt working 100%.  Shop said 14h job!  And wait till does again so they can recheck codes

Then on way home got a certificate of proof of driving from a guy in a explorer....i gueeeees 29500 in a pickup factory rated to 10k is a issue?  Who knew.  200 bucks later i got tonnage.  We've got own cows for 12 years and never been pulled over.

Broke scaper rope.  Had all fixed and this....huge knot/loop.  Had to loosen and start over...again

Grabbed calcium bottle and felt something!

Cant make pics in order........

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Man time flies....

Labor day went for 2 nights to Twisp inland.  Stayed with friends from church at her fathers property.  Really nice place!  I am happy with the truck buff i got for my birthday!  Local rodeonwas neat.  Real cowboys off for a Saturday afternoon.  Sitting on tailgates and lawns all they had.  Kinda cool imo.

Girls got going selling sweet corn....late but really good.  They sell 400 ears in 2 3 hours!  Kinda silly it seams its just corn to us.  

Did 5th grass...turned out pretty good for 28 days.  Hope/plan to get another 1st week of October.

Vintage rv rally in town.  Love it..kids do to.  All open doors

Redid speakers and deck in the 7140.  Been doa for 2.5 years.... PO made mess of speaker mounting.  Made due....but 1 is scratchy a bit.  Think I hooked up backward...?

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Found this yesterday...fascinating look at the green energy thing.  Makes you wonder why would Govt push this completely unsustainable field on it's populace?  Guess who would end up managing the minerals?  Or divying out the batteries....or giving permits to build the sites?  weird.....duh 

 

https://www.wsj.com/articles/if-you-want-renewable-energy-get-ready-to-dig-11565045328

 

If You Want ‘Renewable Energy,’ Get Ready to Dig

Building one wind turbine requires 900 tons of steel, 2,500 tons of concrete and 45 tons of plastic.

By 

Mark P. Mills

Aug. 5, 2019 6:48 pm ET

 

Democrats dream of powering society entirely with wind and solar farms combined with massive batteries. Realizing this dream would require the biggest expansion in mining the world has seen and would produce huge quantities of waste.

“Renewable energy” is a misnomer. Wind and solar machines and batteries are built from nonrenewable materials. And they wear out. Old equipment must be decommissioned, generating millions of tons of waste. The International Renewable Energy Agency calculates that solar goals for 2050 consistent with the Paris Accords will result in old-panel disposal constituting more than double the tonnage of all today’s global plastic waste. Consider some other sobering numbers:

A single electric-car battery weighs about 1,000 pounds. Fabricating one requires digging up, moving and processing more than 500,000 pounds of raw materials somewhere on the planet. The alternative? Use gasoline and extract one-tenth as much total tonnage to deliver the same number of vehicle-miles over the battery’s seven-year life.

When electricity comes from wind or solar machines, every unit of energy produced, or mile traveled, requires far more materials and land than fossil fuels. That physical reality is literally visible: A wind or solar farm stretching to the horizon can be replaced by a handful of gas-fired turbines, each no bigger than a tractor-trailer.

Building one wind turbine requires 900 tons of steel, 2,500 tons of concrete and 45 tons of nonrecyclable plastic. Solar power requires even more cement, steel and glass—not to mention other metals. Global silver and indium mining will jump 250% and 1,200% respectively over the next couple of decades to provide the materials necessary to build the number of solar panels, the International Energy Agency forecasts. World demand for rare-earth elements—which aren’t rare but are rarely mined in America—will rise 300% to 1,000% by 2050 to meet the Paris green goals. If electric vehicles replace conventional cars, demand for cobalt and lithium, will rise more than 20-fold. That doesn’t count batteries to back up wind and solar grids.

Last year a Dutch government-sponsored study concluded that the Netherlands’ green ambitions alone would consume a major share of global minerals. “Exponential growth in [global] renewable energy production capacity is not possible with present-day technologies and annual metal production,” it concluded.

The demand for minerals likely won’t be met by mines in Europe or the U.S. Instead, much of the mining will take place in nations with oppressive labor practices. The Democratic Republic of the Congo produces 70% of the world’s raw cobalt, and China controls 90% of cobalt refining. The Sydney-based Institute for a Sustainable Future cautions that a global “gold” rush for minerals could take miners into “some remote wilderness areas [that] have maintained high biodiversity because they haven’t yet been disturbed.”

What’s more, mining and fabrication require the consumption of hydrocarbons. Building enough wind turbines to supply half the world’s electricity would require nearly two billion tons of coal to produce the concrete and steel, along with two billion barrels of oil to make the composite blades. More than 90% of the world’s solar panels are built in Asia on coal-heavy electric grids.

Engineers joke about discovering “unobtanium,” a magical energy-producing element that appears out of nowhere, requires no land, weighs nothing, and emits nothing. Absent the realization of that impossible dream, hydrocarbons remain a far better alternative than today’s green dreams.

Mr. Mills is a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute and a partner in Cottonwood Venture Partners, an energy-tech venture fund, and author of the recent report, “The ‘New Energy Economy’: An Exercise in Magical Thinking.”

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1 hour ago, TroyDairy said:

Found this yesterday...fascinating look at the green energy thing.  Makes you wonder why would Govt push this completely unsustainable field on it's populace?  Guess who would end up managing the minerals?  Or divying out the batteries....or giving permits to build the sites?  weird.....duh 

 

https://www.wsj.com/articles/if-you-want-renewable-energy-get-ready-to-dig-11565045328

 

If You Want ‘Renewable Energy,’ Get Ready to Dig

Building one wind turbine requires 900 tons of steel, 2,500 tons of concrete and 45 tons of plastic.

By 

Mark P. Mills

Aug. 5, 2019 6:48 pm ET

 

Democrats dream of powering society entirely with wind and solar farms combined with massive batteries. Realizing this dream would require the biggest expansion in mining the world has seen and would produce huge quantities of waste.

“Renewable energy” is a misnomer. Wind and solar machines and batteries are built from nonrenewable materials. And they wear out. Old equipment must be decommissioned, generating millions of tons of waste. The International Renewable Energy Agency calculates that solar goals for 2050 consistent with the Paris Accords will result in old-panel disposal constituting more than double the tonnage of all today’s global plastic waste. Consider some other sobering numbers:

A single electric-car battery weighs about 1,000 pounds. Fabricating one requires digging up, moving and processing more than 500,000 pounds of raw materials somewhere on the planet. The alternative? Use gasoline and extract one-tenth as much total tonnage to deliver the same number of vehicle-miles over the battery’s seven-year life.

When electricity comes from wind or solar machines, every unit of energy produced, or mile traveled, requires far more materials and land than fossil fuels. That physical reality is literally visible: A wind or solar farm stretching to the horizon can be replaced by a handful of gas-fired turbines, each no bigger than a tractor-trailer.

Building one wind turbine requires 900 tons of steel, 2,500 tons of concrete and 45 tons of nonrecyclable plastic. Solar power requires even more cement, steel and glass—not to mention other metals. Global silver and indium mining will jump 250% and 1,200% respectively over the next couple of decades to provide the materials necessary to build the number of solar panels, the International Energy Agency forecasts. World demand for rare-earth elements—which aren’t rare but are rarely mined in America—will rise 300% to 1,000% by 2050 to meet the Paris green goals. If electric vehicles replace conventional cars, demand for cobalt and lithium, will rise more than 20-fold. That doesn’t count batteries to back up wind and solar grids.

Last year a Dutch government-sponsored study concluded that the Netherlands’ green ambitions alone would consume a major share of global minerals. “Exponential growth in [global] renewable energy production capacity is not possible with present-day technologies and annual metal production,” it concluded.

The demand for minerals likely won’t be met by mines in Europe or the U.S. Instead, much of the mining will take place in nations with oppressive labor practices. The Democratic Republic of the Congo produces 70% of the world’s raw cobalt, and China controls 90% of cobalt refining. The Sydney-based Institute for a Sustainable Future cautions that a global “gold” rush for minerals could take miners into “some remote wilderness areas [that] have maintained high biodiversity because they haven’t yet been disturbed.”

What’s more, mining and fabrication require the consumption of hydrocarbons. Building enough wind turbines to supply half the world’s electricity would require nearly two billion tons of coal to produce the concrete and steel, along with two billion barrels of oil to make the composite blades. More than 90% of the world’s solar panels are built in Asia on coal-heavy electric grids.

Engineers joke about discovering “unobtanium,” a magical energy-producing element that appears out of nowhere, requires no land, weighs nothing, and emits nothing. Absent the realization of that impossible dream, hydrocarbons remain a far better alternative than today’s green dreams.

Mr. Mills is a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute and a partner in Cottonwood Venture Partners, an energy-tech venture fund, and author of the recent report, “The ‘New Energy Economy’: An Exercise in Magical Thinking.”

Yep, the devil is in the details. 

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Destroy a virtually untouched ecosystem just to get your "green" energy. Meanwhile the rig leases we were on were at best a couple of acres and it was treated quite well before, during, and after we were done drilling. Makes you shake your head for sure

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hello troy so did you catch the dairy news yesterday on how our check off officials are getting paid, former ag secretary tom viilsack only made about 800 k before leaving the dairy management group that runs these checkoff most were in the 800 k or higher for salaries, it was pointed out you need to pay people good to attract the experience needed to run these check off programs, it was also pointed out that while those 8 executives made good money at least 1600 dairy farms had went out of business, I see price of milk is slowly coming up but around here there are still 2 3 and 4 herds on the local dairy sales, also in wis. forage for winter is going to be a huge problem in the future, every body is counting on corn silage the only problem will be a wet fall as today we are expecting 2 to 4 inches of rain,

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19 hours ago, pt756 said:

hello troy so did you catch the dairy news yesterday on how our check off officials are getting paid, former ag secretary tom viilsack only made about 800 k before leaving the dairy management group that runs these checkoff most were in the 800 k or higher for salaries, it was pointed out you need to pay people good to attract the experience needed to run these check off programs, it was also pointed out that while those 8 executives made good money at least 1600 dairy farms had went out of business, I see price of milk is slowly coming up but around here there are still 2 3 and 4 herds on the local dairy sales, also in wis. forage for winter is going to be a huge problem in the future, every body is counting on corn silage the only problem will be a wet fall as today we are expecting 2 to 4 inches of rain,

I have not read anything yet.  Vilsask is out?  800k.....wow i get the 100k (dont like) but holy moley

I frankly struggle with NMPF more than DMI.  But its like Farm bureau vs Save family Farmers (state ag group).  At Farm B we are in the capital pushing paper and shaking hands teyong to keep crap off ag.  Save Family Farms is callin names and putting hurt in the folk who are tossing the crap.  What is more exciting news?  So people say "what does FB do?" Since its behind scenes.  Nmpf though just seems totally out of touch.  Apparantly dmi as well...

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Troy, LMAO when I saw Ensley's name. The dickhead has a lets say not so stellar reputation around the valley here. Pulled over my forklift for no license plate I explained it was farm equipment he wrote the ticket for no slow moving sign. I called his CO and filed a complaint. They had so many complaints around here they moved him out of the area. He lives in Skidrow area.

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22 hours ago, pt756 said:

hello troy so did you catch the dairy news yesterday on how our check off officials are getting paid, former ag secretary tom viilsack only made about 800 k before leaving the dairy management group that runs these checkoff most were in the 800 k or higher for salaries, it was pointed out you need to pay people good to attract the experience needed to run these check off programs, it was also pointed out that while those 8 executives made good money at least 1600 dairy farms had went out of business, I see price of milk is slowly coming up but around here there are still 2 3 and 4 herds on the local dairy sales, also in wis. forage for winter is going to be a huge problem in the future, every body is counting on corn silage the only problem will be a wet fall as today we are expecting 2 to 4 inches of rain,

https://www.dairyherd.com/article/new-kind-activist

 

Good story...

 

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Sometimes that 800,000/yr goes over peoples heads. I like to divide by 52, which comes out to 15,384.62 a week.  We have similar numbers in state gubermint here.

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1 hour ago, 806 man said:

Troy, LMAO when I saw Ensley's name. The dickhead has a lets say not so stellar reputation around the valley here. Pulled over my forklift for no license plate I explained it was farm equipment he wrote the ticket for no slow moving sign. I called his CO and filed a complaint. They had so many complaints around here they moved him out of the area. He lives in Skidrow area.

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Oh yes your neighbor directly south of you told Terry my brother at a meeting the other day all the wonderful stories about that guy.  how the day he got his license from the state patrol he went to his father's Logging company and wrote him five tickets in the yard because he was pissed that daddy wouldn't let him be a logger with him. Since he qreaked seveal trucks.  AND that the scale house he was stationed in Lyman had been burned down or ran over by trucks three times in two years or something because everyone hated him so much.  It quite fascinating his story and how the heck he keeps a job and of course his son is following in his footsteps I understand.  The state paid for him to move to next county since he recieved seveal death threats.  Perfect fit for a State employee i guess.  But most guy say I got off like a rose.....20k "over" wt is big deal in a semi they say

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