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AUSSIE TD-40

IH gear working in the 80's

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found this youtube video by accident

I don't know most of the models and I think some were not new at the time going by the paint over spray. I would be interested what others think who know more about IH construction equipment than I do.

don't know how to do a clik clik link but this will find it, LARGEST/BIGGEST/HEAVIEST LOAD 1157 TONS

Jake

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Cool video Saw a euclid dozer amongst the IH equipment TC12??

Have to call these folks up gotta move my T20 down to the field ;)

Kevin

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Special built stuff, anybody know where this was?

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Tennessee, Looks like IH D500 rubber tired dozers doing the pulling.

Kevin

post-77390-0-13119500-1388928588_thumb.j

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Always thought the D500 was the biggest wheel dozer IH made ,I was wrong as usual LOL

apparently they made 15 D950 "bigfoot" dozers , any info out there???

post-77390-0-06879800-1388929930_thumb.j

post-77390-0-78504000-1388929941_thumb.j

post-77390-0-51324500-1388929954_thumb.j

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Kinda looks nearly the same? That blade looks so dinky.

I'd vote for D500 as well.

I have seen a D400 loader and it was huge. You could see it parked behind a 40 foot semi box trailer.

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The info did come from another forum ie; no verification , could just be a myth!!

But it was on the internet it must be true :)

Kevin

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Is this the nuke plant near Lebanon Tn? the one they never finished

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IDK BUT THEY SAID THIS WAS DONE IN 1980 IF MY HEARING IS RIGHT....

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The trucks look to be payhaulers...a 4wd 180 and an older model 65... the pulling tractors have me stumped...not international as they don't articulate...the headlights make me want to say old michigan 375 rear wheel steer machines heavily modified.. as far as the bigfoot d500 goes ...from what I was told a while back a large contractor out west modified a fleet of d500 paydozers with angle blades..bigger tires and rippers to build that monster in the photographs.

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I think you got it Brian , at 4:46 the operator is sitting on the dash facing the rear of the machine while driving

And as they are pushing it on the barge you can just make out michigan between the headlights :)

Kevin

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They do look Michigan with that grill. There would be IH logo on there as well.

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Phipps Bend was never completed. The RPV was for a GE BWR and the RPVs for a BWR are much larger than those for the PWR. The RPV for the newest ESBWR from GE is over 90 feet long and 26 feet wide. However they haven't sold any yet to anyone.

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thanks to M Diesel for the direct link, and a big thanks to all who posted to this.

even if its not all IH it sure was interesting

Jake.

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Phipps Bend was never completed. The RPV was for a GE BWR and the RPVs for a BWR are much larger than those for the PWR. The RPV for the newest ESBWR from GE is over 90 feet long and 26 feet wide. However they haven't sold any yet to anyone.

Huh ??? ,Forgive my ignorance on the abbreviations

But I would like to know :)

Kevin

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Kevin:

RPV - Reactor Pressure Vessel

BWR - Boiling Water Reactor

ESBWR - Economic Simplified Boiling water Reactor

From what I understand of these things the Fukishima reactors were early BWRs and required power to keep their coolant circulating even when the reactors are scrammed. They began to melt down when the tsunami wiped out their diesel powered emergency generators. The latest designs (ESBWR) function passively so they won't melt down even without power. Or, so they claim.

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