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pros/cons between 2388/66 combines


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I am looking to upgrade my combine a little. The 1640 is starting to feel a little too small, especially with the limited harvest windows that have been occurring here lately. My local dealer has A 2000 2366 at 2000 sep hours and my cousin is trying o talk me into a 2388 which it looks like can be gotten nearly anywhere for the same or less than a 66. What should I look for when scoping out a different machine? How do you determine that the rubber shaker bushings are weak? What other areas should I k

look over closely? How many differences are there between say a 2000 model and a 2003 and up 2388? Duals or not? Currently I run a 6 row narrow, but would like to go to an 8 row narrow. Anybody ever got a machine on the Auctiontime website?? I have been watching a few on there and they definitely look to be more affordable, but how much can you trust the dealer selling it? Any opinions or experiences you fellas have would be great to hear about, thanks, Rob

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Go for the 2388. Often can buy them cheaper. Shaker bushings around 2500 separator/3000 engine hours. Check the vertical discharge auger, elevator chains, transition cone, feeder bottom (if lots of soybeans), chopper knoves, wooden bearings on auger bed, cylinder rasps, concaves etc

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We have bought a lot of stuff online. If they have a lot of pictures they are being honest but lack of pictures hiding the downfalls. A lot of dealers have turned to auction time or other online sales. Don't have to transport equipment and no warranty on anything like a local buyer might want. Most of the stuff on auction time are big dealer groups. Not all dealers have the same name but belong to some big ownership groups and they date their inventory if it is on the lot to long get rid of it and it keeps the salesmen honest some of the money lost comes back out of their commission. Last year though we looked at some 1680 s close to us on auction time thy were described rough but the worst looking edible bean machines I had ever seen they brought good money and went to a jockey in strawberry point Iowa. He was probably a little let down on his purchases.

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Get the 2388, larger rotor, larger sieves , bigger elevators, larger hydro, transmission, final drives , more hp. Make sure you get specialty rotor or AFX rotor, start early and run late, and best of all no rumbling . I sold a lot of machines and 90 percent of the people never have enough power and always want to go fast and get more done !!! That is in most of us and I want them to do the best job combining and for you to get the highest quality grain with the least amount of trouble .

Good luck, Danny

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Guess I wouldn't pass up a 2366 in really good shape over a 2388 in average condition. I was under the impression that the hydro's, transmission and final drives are the same on both models. In our area the 66's are more likely to have been owned by smaller operators and therefore less acres. Check the normal wear areas mentioned above on both models being considered....you won't go wrong with either model. Good luck.

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I went from a 1460 to an 88 what I really like is to be able to push a 30' flex in beans just for the reason you are looking to upgrade.The only thing I don't like is changing the concaves and grates to do wheat.They are HEAVY, you need your wheaties before tackling on your own.

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where the big difference between the 60 series and 80 shows is in high yielding spring wheat. you can do about 5 to 6 acres an hour with a 80 size with wheat running about 70 then with a 60 size you get 2 to 3 acres an hour

In winter wheat yielding in the mid 90's I can do about 6 acres an hour with a twenty foot platform. This is with a 2366.

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regarding buying through auctiontime: I bought a 1460 that way last spring - the dealer who had it put up some pretty good pictures, and then I called and the salesman went out with his cell phone and answered questions. I'm sure they could have texted or e mailed me additional pics. I got a favorable impression of the salesman while we talked and felt it was a good risk. It worked out that I could get away to see it in person, it was only a couple of hundred miles away, and that gave me the confidence to set my upper limit a little higher than I would have otherwise - but I didn't need to.

(for what it's worth, this was at Vetter's, in Nevada, IA, and they treated me pretty well in general)

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We went from a '99 2366 to a '02 2388. The 88 was a late production & had many of the updates that the '03s had. We mainly grow soybeans & corn with a little winter wheat in some years. Biggest difference we seen was an increase in bean harvest, which was what we were after. Going from a 25' head to a 30' and able to run faster while in poorer conditions was the biggest gain. In dead ripe beans the 2366 would have handled a 30' but in green stemmed beans there were times I wish we had been pushing a 20' instead of the 25'. As far as corn, we didn't see a big increase in harvesting. We were already running a 1083 head on the 66 and ran the same head on the 88. We could see a little bit of increase with the 88 when unloading on the go, or in high moisture (28% & up) but we normally don't shell corn that wet. We probably could have done more in corn with the 88 but were already close to maxed out in what we could get away from the combine.

You don't say how many acres you will be putting thru the machine. At the time we were harvesting approx 2,500 ac with the 2366 & then the 2388 with that being a 60 / 40 mix with more corn. Like another poster said, a 2366 will have more likely came from a smaller farm operation than a 88. Not that that makes a lot of difference. More importance is how the machine was maintained by the previous owner(s). All things said, I would lean towards a 2388 unless there's a big difference in the conditions of the machines.

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I'll be using it on approx. 1000-1400 acres per year after dad quits which will be soon. As of this year I had 900 of my own to farm, and usually pick up a few custom acres if time permits. I am leaning toward a 2388 and am watching a few on auctiontime and have looked at a few from dealers. What about yield/moisture monitors? Do you guys like the case touchscreen or the ag leader monitor better? Or is there much difference between them? Some machines I have looked at the PO kept the monitor. Where is the best place to find a monitor in that case? Do they all plug in the same, or is the harnesses different? Are the grain loss monitors any good? I could never get the one on my 1640 to work very well, it would get trash stuck on the sensors and give a false reading so I usually didn't even turn it on. What makes the AFX rotor different/better? What updates/improvements did they make on the 03+ machines? CaseIH dealers have 2 yrs 0 interest till Jan of 14 which would help on the price also. Also I would like to upgrade to a 2208 head. What to look for on those? Thanks, Rob

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The late 23s got rid of the pto and went to a 5 rib belt and tightener like a 60 machine. They are like a 2588 with the side screen again.we bought a 2188 this spring and it had a broken universal display I got a used one programmed from a case ih dealer for 800 and it was the bigger universal plus monitor. I haven't taken the time to calibrate it by the load but it is close on the yield maybe by 10 percent or so you will be happy with any one you buy.

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Hi: Don't wory aboout changing concaves in the '88. Install the wide space concaves, and if you need more thresh for wheat or other similar crops, use cover plates under the concave to get the desired results. Cover plates are much easier and safer to handle. CardaleBob.

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CardaleBob: By "wide space" concaves I assume you mean corn and soybean concaves. Am I correct or is there some jobber concave? Around here some people just use the cover plates over the corn concaves and just remove the cover plates when doing beans and corn.

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To do a good job in high yield corn you need to pull ever other concave wire in the large wire, gives you more capacity with less fines.

Soys you should use all the wires but can get by with every other one pulled.

Wheat works best with all small wire concaves, in barley use small wire in # 1 then large wire with all the wires.

Also use slotted grates for small grains.

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Ray: I use the large wire concave in corn with all the wires intact. This year in 180 bu/ac corn I was getting anywhere from 0.1 to 0.4% dockage at the elevator in 25% moisture corn. So far I have not needed to remove every other wire but have heard of some people besides yourself doing it. I find that opening up the concaves a bit drives down the dockage drastically in high yielding corn. It sure is a lot better dockage than the 2% with the S670, S680 series of JD combines that local operators experienced this fall. I suppose that is why there are three late model JD combines sitting at Seaforth right now.

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George, you can still do a good job on corn with all the wires in the concave, just saying you can increase capacity by pulling every other one & still keep your dockage down.

I did custom combining for 25 years with Axial Flows, I always got upset if dockage was over 0.5 %

BTW I would also be interested in the Hydraulic lift kit for the 1300 3pt mower.

When you inquire about the price ask them if they would give a discount if we took 2 kits.

Ray

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Ray: I agree with what you are saying. Like you I have been using an Axial flow for 20 years doing corn and the elevator always likes my corn because of low dockage. With just a 1063 on the 1660 combine there is ample capacity to do 180 Bu corn without having to remove wires. There is no doubt you can set the concaves too tight and your dockage will go up. I just adjust the clearance to get the low dockage and it shells very well with the specialty rotor. I am sure if I had an eight row head on it I would need to pull every second wire.

Since Rowse have no dealer in this area and the only one in Canada is in Manitoba. I thought when I am ready next spring to change it I would call Rowse and speak to Randy and take it from there. For me it is a safety item, for when I trim down the wheat stubble after harvest next August- September. I will talk to them about 2 kits. Incidentally, I also have a very very low acres 1100 trailing mower for the Super C but the 7 foot bar is not nearly as heavy as the 9 foot bar on the 1300 mower and the hydraulic cylinder lifts it up higher to start with.

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When I had my 1460 I had to pull every other wire not because of damage but due to rotor loss.You have to be carefull how far you open your concave or that will cause rotor loss as well.This year I was thinking about removing them on my 88 as well as we had corn coming off wet @220+ I had to slow down a bit and thats with only 6 rows.

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Whats bad about the 2200 series heads? I have a cousin that has been thru them and is now up to the new 44?00 series. He says they are a good head, also newer than the 1000 series heads. He did say they work best in corn that is a little green yet as in very dry stalks, the stalks will break off instead of pull down. My old 863 head is needing upper shafts and bushings for the gathering chains and is also very loose as far as stalk roll timing is concerned. There is a lot of slop in them so they don't always run in time where the knives are even. The knives are pretty good but I still have a couple rows that will plug where the gathering chains can't get the ears out of the way fast enough. One row will plug down by the spirals when starting the pass so I guess it also needs new spirals. The gearboxes all leak some, at least they are empty by the next season. So how much money and time can you put into a head that is30 yrs plus old??? I would like to have the hyd decks plates also. Rob

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Boog could give you his ideas on 2200 and up cornheads. They made 1083's up until 2002 with poly. I put a round bar concave in my 2366 in the center slot and it dramatically reduces rotor loss of grain thru the rear. I also slow all my vanes over grates down all the way to give the rotor more time to separate the grain out.

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