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Kevingweq

T20 Tractractor Teardown

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Judging from what I could see in the sparkplug holes we figgered the T20 had to come apart , So we started with the valve cover Gotta love the old time lubrication system

made outta wicks and felts how cool is that? found 3 bent pushrods not so bad, found 3 out of 8 valves moved freely not so bad, found intake manifold cracked not so

good I think it can be fixed I hope, Popped the head up and off quite a bit of rust cylinders 1-4 are at TDC 2-3 at BDC Hmmm No 3 looks way far down in the hole so I grab a

measuring stick and it is 8" below deck height Hmmm thought I remembered reading 5" stroke , check #2 it measures 5" on the money , so upon opening up the handy dandy

peek inside porthole and shining a light in there I can see most of #3 piston skirt hanging way down below the liner, So tonight we pulled the skidplate and then the oil drain plug

just shy of 5 gallons of nice clean drinkin water came rushin out at least the drain plug wasnt clogged ''good thing''

Next we went exploring and the pictures tell the story , now we got all 4 rod caps off and still can't get the slightest wiggle out of the crank and from what I can see the ball bearings don't look that bad

Any ideas what else could lock it up so tight , something in gear train? something in clutch? Cam?

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Check out that connecting rod !!!! What do you think caused it ? the crank journal does not look bad definitely not bad enough to bend a rod . Ether , starting fluid w/spark advanced??

that one is gettin polished up for a paperweight

Found a good supply of square headed nuts and bolts in the bellypan

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Head not too bad

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kevingweq,

What I think might have happened is that that cylinder may have been clear full of water, (leaky head gasket) and at the beggining of the compression stroke. When they couldn't get it to crank over, they might have tried to tow the tractor to start it. That for sure would have done it!!!

Mo

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Hmm, been there with these sinking feeling, bigger than you hoped projects.

I suggest getting inside the timing cover for a look to figure out what is jamming it up.

With what you are discovering you won't regret checking everything out, but most likely will regret it if you don't.

Trying to remember. Arn't the bearings rollers?

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Kevingweq.

Good luck on your project. Remember 'nothing is impossible' but 'miracles take a little longer!' Keep posting.

Regards, John.

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James Yes the 2 main bearings are rollers,

Mo I think you hit the nail on the head ,

Thanks John

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Kevin, After looking at your pictures, I feel like a nail has been driven into my head.

I agree with Mo that bent rod is probably the result of hydrolock and someone who played too rough.

No 1 cylinder looks to be a tough removal. Head definitely looks salvagable. better get the "weasel juice" in the 1 gallon size.

I predict you and Mo will become best friends soon. Jim.

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When they are stuck like that it is probably a combination of all the bearings. I have a freshly assembled TD9 block that suffered the same. All new parts, but owner died and motor sat in garage for over 40 years with no head on it. Nothing moves.

Obvious at this point, but agree on disconnecting the cam and work on each piece independently. Those cam bearings have a lot of surface area. At least there is one shiny cam lobe :)

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Gordon Rice at Rice equipment has manifolds for the best price I found for mine.

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Doing real well in the no breaking anything department ,doing pretty good in the no snapped bolt department,

only 1 so far on the 3 bolt flange for the exhaust pipe, probably took about 3ft lbs to break it,

But luckily it is the bolt that can be drilled right thru and worked out fairly easy,

So far we have all the rod caps off , timing cover off,hey feels like the mag works like it should :) pulled the cam

gear , and the cam turns a little stiff but it turns ,the crank is still tighter than (insert your favorite saying here) my dad always referenced

the last part of a bull .I can't get the crank to move even a fraction.

So tomorrow I will investigate a little further ,probably pull the clutch cover just to see what it looks like,

Any other ideas ???

Check out the timing marks in the picture hopefully i will be putting them back just like that sometime in the not to distant future

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The pistons are stuck, that is why the crank won't move even a little. Even with the rod caps off, you are still trying to move 2 pistons when you attempt to turn the crank. You may as well torch the bent rod and remove it . Clean the rust out of the cylinder on #2 using a wire wheel and then a cylinder hone. Get underneath and see if you can drive the #2 piston up enough so that the rod clears the crank. Once that is accompolished, the crank sould turn. Turn it a quarter turn so the crank throws are horizontal and then you can drive all the pistons down and out of the sleeves.

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Kevin, That bent rod has probably twisted in the journal locking it up. Agreed that the pistons need to come out to gain clearance. Kirk has a good idea on cleanup. You may lift sleeves with the piston driving up from the bottom. After cleanup of the exposed cylinder wall area and the gap between piston and cylinder, put some penetrant like ATF/ acetone in. put in couple cups of old diesel and a rag and light on fire. Keep adding diesel to hole to keep fire going. Let it burn for at least half hour or more and let it go out. Then while sleeve is hot, try driving the piston up from the bottom. The heating expands the sleeve and breaks rust bonds and allows the penetrant to creep down. used it many time on old one cylinder farm engines that were rusted solid.

be sure to do this outside and remove anything flammable like the fuel tank. Jim.

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Ok we are progressing, we have all 4 rods out of the way of the crankshaft , I was actually able to roll the top

bearing shell out of the pretzel rod, #3

Did the same to #'s 1-2-4

Then we started voodoo fires fueled with weasel juice, sacrificed two small farm animals (beanie babies) ,sawed a fresh piece of hardwood

from a really nice pallet and applied gentle persuasion 3 pounds worth from all directions

#4 up and loose

#2 up and loose

#1 up but she took the liner with it

#3 still in there but the rod end is not interfering with any rotating pieces

Crankshaft might as well be welded

Pulled up the clutch cover ,the clutch fingers are kinda in pretty far but the throwout bearing actually slides

on the tube

made sure the clutch brake was'nt seized up

put a 6 foot prybar in a strategic place on the clutch cover not a wiggle

there is water in the clutch compartment

so am I correct in assuming it could only be 2 things at this point

#1 Crank main bearings or

#2 rust ,crap , builtup behind and around bottom of flywheel

Thank You ,Thank You , Everybody for all your time and input

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At this point I am thinking it is the main bearings. You have it torn apart this far, maybe you should just pull the motor.

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We pulled the motor came out not too much trouble,

now how do i go about disassembling the rest of the motor

specifically how do I get the flywheel off?

does that little threaded plug under the nut and washer have to come out first?

is it tapered fit or straight ?

any tricks to removing the main bearings?

Thanks kev

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kev,

As I recall the circular thing by the flat spot on the crank is a threaded pin that you have to take out first. Seems it was 3/8 STD thread; screw a bolt in there and use a slide hammer to get it out.. Then, I just used a large 3 jaw puller to get the flywheel off. I don't remember what sort of configureation I used to actually set up the puller. I remember that it came off really hard... I had actual picts of me doing it, but my 'puter crashed an I lost 'em. This is the only pict that I have; looks like I used through bolts to hold the puller jaws.... Make sure to really polish the crank with emery paper strips, and really polish the inside of the flywheel, too, to make it a lot easier to hammer (20lb.) the wheel back on. Use never sieeze.

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This is a quote from the SERVICEMEN'S GUIDE for T-20 Engine.

"MAIN BEARINGS: Bearings are removed from the crankcase with the crankshaft ....

PRECAUTION: The ball loading grooves of main bearing should be assembled facing toward center of crankshaft, and should be located on camshaft side of engine when No. 1 crankpin is at top dead center."

I don't know just how important this is, but I suspect it has something to do with oiling...

I suggest that you order a copy of "SERVICEMEN'S GUIDE for Model U-7 Power Unit and T-20 and F-20 Engine" from Jensales. It has a lot more info that you may need...

.

Mo

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We got the flywheel off yesterday ,managed to get a 2 jaw puller to grab in the big holes,

Thanks for the info Mo I have ordered the service book from binderbooks ,has'nt got here yet

so the crank was still tight figgered it had to be the roller bearings were stuck .

found a nice big chunk of brass pin out of a Walter differential wound up and whacked both ends of the crank

She's turning beautiful!!!!!! :) :)

Put a long 3/8 drive extension thru the hole in the front of the crank if it is offset by even a 1/2 inch the crank just rolls to the heavy side!!

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I ended up cutting the pretzel rod , then the piston came out the botton with one tiny tap

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Fantastic!! Sounds like you won't have to replace the main bearings, unless you really want to. On the Regular and 10-20 engines I rebuilt I went ahead and installed new main bearings since I already had it apart and the old ones were worn, rusty and rumbled when turned.

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Can I get bearings at a local bearing house ?

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Yes, but if you keep an eye on ebay, you can get them a LOT cheaper. The original numbers are 1313 for the front bearing and 1315 for the rear. The originals are the 'max-fill' type with extra balls to handle higher loads. These type bearings are still available but a LOT more expensive. I see no problems using the standard duty ball bearings though. The numbers for those are 6313 and 6315.

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You may want to try Evaporust on the machined parts to remove the rust without hurting the machined surfaces. The Navy dunks whole engine blocks in it. It is not cheap, but it really works well. I buy it by the gallon at harbor Freight, but you can get it at other places as well. Soak the part in it overnight and brush it with a still bristle brush as you rinse it off.

http://www.evaporust.com/evaporust.html?gclid=CKrSkee-w7gCFZGi4AodQScAGg

http://www.harborfreight.com/1-gallon-evapo-rust-rust-remover-96431.html

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Kevin, Sounds like you are making good progress. Finally someone found something usefull for beanie babies. On the cylinders that had pistons removed how does the inside of sleeve look? How do the rod journals look?

Now the hunt for new parts begins. May want to check the bore on the sleeves to see what size of piston you are looking for. If the sleeves are junk, possible to find a piston sleeve set in STD. to replace. Jim.

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You may want to try Evaporust on the machined parts to remove the rust without hurting the machined surfaces.

I have had good results with white vinegar. Removes/softens the rust and doesn't do much else.

I can't say I have tried it with whitemetal i.e. the cam bushes which are probably still fitted. Used it several times for engine block water spaces and radiators (which are soldered - close to white metal?)

... however, its dirt cheap, safe to handle and usually at the grocery store.

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