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Split rims?

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What's the best way to get rid of split rims on the B160? Local tire shop wants 75/tire to mount. Any ideas?

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I'm not sure which style of rims you have ; The Budd or the Dayton design? (Budd are the type that go on like a regular rim with lug nuts and the Daytons usually have a spacer between them and locking tabs around the outside)IMG_4386_zps85333673.jpg

This is what a Budd rim looks like

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Yeah that's them in the pic.

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Is yours the 20" rims as well? If so I still haven't found any replacements at a reasonable price (so far they've been around $500 or better each)

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Yes they are 20". So $500 is for a new wheel that is not a split rim?

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If you can, get rid of those split rims. Almost everyone is ditching those. The are very dangerous to mount tires on and the new rims are much safer and cheaper to have serviced.

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I have changed tires on a few of those split rim wheels right here on the farm with no problems but I have heard some scary stories of guys getting injured even using all the safety devices in a tire shop. Maybe I was just lucky? I always cleaned the ring and rim up well, get all the rust off and very slowly and carefully add air, watching to be sure the tire bead seats evenly. I also wrapped a chain around the rim and tire just in case. I have three trucks, one with dayton, two with budd wheels.

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I have a 51 Ford F5, which is roughly in the same class, and it also has split rims. on this size truck, they did not come with daytons, but used the budd type.. There are few different types of split rims for these trucks though. The two most popular are Split ring and the 2-piece advanced rim. The split-ring type is a 2-piece rim that has a "split ring that goes on the outside edge of the rim to hold the center in place and keep the rim halfs from seperating. the split-ring type are ok to use as long as they are not badly rusted. the ones in the pic look to me like split-rings.

The 2-piece advanced rim is a VERY dangerous type also known as or reffered to as "widow-makers". Widow makers are a 2-piece rim that have a ring that is welded to the inner rim. If the outside half of the rim is not seated properly in the ring(which there is no way to tell), the outside half of the rim will blow off when filled with air or when ever it wants to(it may seem like you have it seated properley, and you may have been able to fill it with air, but DO NOT trust them). the force of the rim when its blown off, can go through a concrete wall, shear off posts, or dismember or kill you if you are in the way. if you have this type of rim DO NOT USE THEM. remove them from the truck and get rid of them.

(i tried to load some pics to show the difference and designs, but my computer wont let me.)

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I have a 51 Ford F5, which is roughly in the same class, and it also has split rims. on this size truck, they did not come with daytons, but used the budd type.. There are few different types of split rims for these trucks though. The two most popular are Split ring and the 2-piece advanced rim. The split-ring type is a 2-piece rim that has a "split ring that goes on the outside edge of the rim to hold the center in place and keep the rim halfs from seperating. the split-ring type are ok to use as long as they are not badly rusted. the ones in the pic look to me like split-rings.

The 2-piece advanced rim is a VERY dangerous type also known as or reffered to as "widow-makers". Widow makers are a 2-piece rim that have a ring that is welded to the inner rim. If the outside half of the rim is not seated properly in the ring(which there is no way to tell), the outside half of the rim will blow off when filled with air or when ever it wants to(it may seem like you have it seated properley, and you may have been able to fill it with air, but DO NOT trust them). the force of the rim when its blown off, can go through a concrete wall, shear off posts, or dismember or kill you if you are in the way. if you have this type of rim DO NOT USE THEM. remove them from the truck and get rid of them.

(i tried to load some pics to show the difference and designs, but my computer wont let me.)

On the older Fords , and I'm thinking of a 46 model, the "ring" was not a continuous circle. It had a break in it. The IH trucks I have all have a continuous circular ring. (Or is it the opposite)? Now I have to go out and check.

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5D3BA851-BDD9-43A1-9899-40B6542BC7EA-1090-000000D9BAA4A2FD_zpsc2939e97.jpg

Here are mine

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5D3BA851-BDD9-43A1-9899-40B6542BC7EA-1090-000000D9BAA4A2FD_zpsc2939e97.jpg

Here are mine

The ring is split here as can be seen. The rim is the solid. Some rims were split and the ring was solid. All of these types are called split rims.

I had many of these types and have changed hundreds of these with no problems. I threw many away including all of the split rims with solid rings. All of the replacements had a solid rim and a split ring. The bad part of the rings is that they got sprung and didn't like to stay in the groove on the rim, then they were dangerous as they could fly off when airing them up. I threw any thing like that away too. I always ran the cast spoke wheels (also called Daytons) and new rims were readily available as late as 12 years ago. Single piece rims for a Dayton type wheel are still available for use with a tubeless tire. The Budd's, especially this type (5 or 6 studs) are probably impossible to find.

Hope this helps some.

DWF

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The local tire shop here says they are welding centers into the tubeless rims. This would be to convert a 5 or 6 hole stud rim over. I think they said it ran about $200 a wheel. So that is an option.

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The local tire shop here says they are welding centers into the tubeless rims. This would be to convert a 5 or 6 hole stud rim over. I think they said it ran about $200 a wheel. So that is an option.

Where are you from IHC?

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Maybe I'm not looking in the correct spot but, I can't find anyone that does fab work around here. Local welding shop(huge company) WILL NOT work on anything that could possibly be bolted on a vehicle. Tried to get them to machine a steering arm and he ran me out of the office! I guess it's a liability thing. I'll keep digging, something will pop up.

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I phoned wheel build shops about putting new rims on my old centers but they all refused for libility reasons

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So what's the alternative? The dream is get the girl all slicked up, paint the super C and head to the roundup! Don't want to drive too far if I had a problem! How sweet would that be a C on the back!!

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Prior to the introduction of the .5" wheels 16.5 and so all the hd from 3/4T and up all had split rims. My 1970 1200D had bud split ring split wheels in 750-16 tire size.

A 1970 1100D 4x4 Travelall had solid locking ring splits for 7.00 X15 size. The split type wheels for light trucks were far heavier and stronger than any of the passenger type tires and wheels. These were both optional wheels and cost more money!!

Neither wheel ever gave me any trouble. I changed my on tires ---- splits can easily be changed without some sort of tire machine.

I got rid of both sets of splits not because of some unsupported safety issue but I simply wanted wider wheels in the 12.5X16.5 size tires.

Old rusted out wheels are a problem without regard to construction techniques.

Every semi on wheels prior to around 1975 would have had splits on every wheel position. I do not recall having tire changers constantly at the emergency room because of wheel failure!

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What's the hype about then? Couple people were injured and everyone's perinoid? I just wish it wasn't so much to mount a new tire! Thanks

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I guess part of the problem is that like some of us those rims are getting old.I have a grandson working at a tireshop. The owner wont let the staff change 2 piece rims but he will change some for good customers after hours himself.I still do my own .Like someone else said;don't fool with a sprung lock ring

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Those are the 2 piece rims and are slightly harder to work with. Mine are the 3 piece ones and when I break them down to work on them I am very cautious I have been working as a mechanic for more years than I care to say and have worked on a mountain of these. They can be broken down fairly easily with not much more than a bead axe, a valve removal tool, and a prybar to get under the ring. putting the tire back on is where most accidents happen as you must make sure ALL surfaces are clean and checked for cracks, be sure to get the lock ring securely INTO the groove all the way around. After this put a GOOD heavy chain around the tire and through the holes in the rim(not so tight you are unable to remove the chain afterward) and use a locking air chuck to fill the tire up one you can stop remotely is the best so you are not reaching across the tire/rim and slowly inflate. I really wish mechanics nowadays would learn how to approach these with the same diligence as us old timers were taught, as the horror stories I've heard about kids even dealing with your average modern econobox tires cause problems a lot more often than in the old days. Yes all the trucks I own except my '83 rat chaser, run 2 or 3 piece rims, R130-3, R160-2, L110-3, Cargostar 1710A-2(the only one running Daytons.)

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I was surprised to see that all three of my bigger IH trucks have different type split rims. The Loadstar has a true "split ring" as you can see in the picture .

post-90-0-68550500-1357412798_thumb.jpg

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My yellow R160 wheel seems to have an extra locking ring just inside the outer continuous ring as seen in this picture.

The Green S160 has a convex outer ring and the R160 wheels have a concaved outer ring. Not sure if the S truck has that extra locking ring or not. Its got Dayton front tires too. :rolleyes: You don't see many of them anymore.

Edit: I was cleaning up the wheel on the R160 (yellow) today and noticed that the wheel is stamped "Kelsey Wheel made in Canada". Near the centre just beside the bolt holes. Another stamp has the numbers 3 53. Possibly the year of manufacture??

post-90-0-35743800-1357413151_thumb.jpg

post-90-0-98098500-1357413203_thumb.jpg

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i will change split rings for me only .

with much care .

the one's that come apart in the centre of the rims are bad .

if you do it make sure the parts are good .

not fun to watch some one running around holding the side head .

he was lucky .

been lots of people killed with them .

i would put the center's in the tubless dayton rim .

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I have worked with them in the past and still do occasionally however I prefer doing only the ones on my own truck as I know they are in very good condition. I took them all apart, cleaned/inspected, and in the spring I'll be tearing them down again to paint. I may have also run across an L110 parts truck that has the 16' one piece rims and the rear diff that will probably give me a better ratio than the 7.39:1 presently in my truck.

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