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Loadstar

Loadstar Cabover

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A while back I learned here that what I thought was a Cargostar could actually have been a cabover Loadstar prior to the early seventies. Not sure of the year on this advertising photo but it shows a cabover Loadstar.

post-90-0-46212900-1356917649_thumb.jpg

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What's the number on the back of the brochure--AD-xxxx-aa. The letters on the end will identify the year.

Howard

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A while back I learned here that what I thought was a Cargostar could actually have been a cabover Loadstar prior to the early seventies. Not sure of the year on this advertising photo but it shows a cabover Loadstar.

soon as i can ill snap a picture of the co loadstar here. it gets used to haul hay actually. little beat up. 345 v8.

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heres one for you though buddy. feed truck 1600. 345. beautiful. no rust. great work truck. not a CO but a neat rig you can appreciate. hard to drive though. needs a new gear box

post-68134-0-79030500-1356922056_thumb.j

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What's the number on the back of the brochure--AD-xxxx-aa. The letters on the end will identify the year.

Howard

I don't actually own the ad.. Borrowed the image from an ad on ebay as it was the only photo I could find showing the CO Loadstar.

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This is my uncles '64 Loadstar cabover.

DSCF0309.jpg

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Nice!! how do the cabovers do empty?

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What's the number on the back of the brochure--AD-xxxx-aa. The letters on the end will identify the year.

Howard

I don't actually own the ad.. Borrowed the image from an ad on ebay as it was the only photo I could find showing the CO Loadstar.

The CO-Loadstar was introduced in 1963 and replaced by the Cargostar in May, 1970 so the date should be between those dates.

Howard

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Nice!! how do the cabovers do empty?

I don't know if I'm understanding your question correctly or not but this truck has a 304 and 4 speed on the column. When driving down the road empty on a calm day it goes pretty good. If you drive it against a stiff headwind, it seems like it pulls harder empty that it does when loaded.

I've always loved driving this truck with it's column shift and the 2 speed rearend that is shifted with a push/pull switch on the dash. There are times when I wish it had powersteering.

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Nice!! how do the cabovers do empty?

I don't know if I'm understanding your question correctly or not but this truck has a 304 and 4 speed on the column. When driving down the road empty on a calm day it goes pretty good. If you drive it against a stiff headwind, it seems like it pulls harder empty that it does when loaded.

I've always loved driving this truck with it's column shift and the 2 speed rearend that is shifted with a push/pull switch on the dash. There are times when I wish it had powersteering.

I was more wondering about how rough they road sitting in front of the axle. I have never had the pleasure of riding in a cab over of any size. Sure makes a cool loking grain truck. About the column shift, the 2 speed switch is on the dash. Is it odd to shift the column and then reach up to shift the axle?

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Not odd, 2nd nature split shifting with CO1800 345 ,5 speed x 2 speed (switch on dash) axle especially when loaded.

Need to keep load balanced, & not too heavy over front axle.

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Not much time in one like that, but there is a whole lot of nothing out in front, and sitting ahead of the steer axle gives it a weird feeling. It is unique. You sorta slide sideways when turning. The newer cab overs were taller and of course had a lot of front to back. I don't think I would care much for the dash switch. Guess you could always mount a switch on the shifter? That would be a little strange to drive. :)

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The ride is actually pretty good. This is the only truck of this vintage that I know of that has shock absorbers. Don't know if that's the reason for the ride quality but it does ride pretty well. Shifting this thing is part of the fun of driving it. Here is a cabover badge that I picked up somewhere.

Image-7_zpsd8adec50.jpg

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I've got a picture of a local early sixties cabover Loadstar with a huge load of hay bales that I will try and post here. And speaking of shock absorbers on trucks, my S160 has them on the front. Lever action shocks. The only IH that size that I have ever seen shock absorbers on.

post-90-0-16987200-1357608565_thumb.jpg

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I take it the entire shock consists of the part on the frame? Nothing hidden?

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I take it the entire shock consists of the part on the frame? Nothing hidden?

You are right, it is all there in the picture although a little hard to see. Some time I will have to compare axles between the S and R 160 to see if the R also has holes in the frame for the shocks to mount. As well as a link on the axle to connect. One major difference, my R160 has a "fish plated" frame. Extra layer of steel starting about the front axle and extending all the way to the front hangers of the rear springs.

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That cab over loadstar looks a lot like my 1962 190 series cab over fire truck.

I would say my old fire truck is very nice riding and easy driving for its age and size.

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Here is my 1969 Loadstar hauling a TD-40 I scrapped out. This thing drives quite nicely. I had to go 100 miles from home to get the TD-40. Smooth as silk down the interstate at about 50-55 MPH. At that speed the engine is wound out about all the way.post-940-0-40132700-1358347775_thumb.jpg

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Here is my 1969 Loadstar hauling a TD-40 I scrapped out. This thing drives quite nicely. I had to go 100 miles from home to get the TD-40. Smooth as silk down the interstate at about 50-55 MPH. At that speed the engine is wound out about all the way.post-940-0-40132700-1358347775_thumb.jpg

Nice looking cabover. You can sure see in this side view how that front axle could be overloaded. On my conventional cab loadstar the grain box sits much further back. Actually mine has too much overhang behind the rear axle but the 15 foot box was installed back in the days when nobody worried much about overloading.

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This is my uncles '64 Loadstar cabover.

DSCF0309.jpg

I just bought one just like this. I'm surprised to see another grain box setup with the axle so close to the center. When you raise it the back of the box comes about 12" off the ground - not to handy for dumping into an auger. Mine is a 345 5 speed, straight axle, hydraulic brakes. I was surprised to find an 1800 with 345, I thought for sure it would have a 392. There isn't a good way for the radiator to get air, so they put a propeller on the end of the crank to deafen you while you drive. Cab is straight, no rust, decent paint, and a nice grain body for $200 - not a bad deal, I couldn't pass it up. Seeing this picture makes me want to get it out and play with it.

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What size Detroits were in the cargostar cabovers? Were they 6vs or 671s or the 8.2 fuel pinchers?

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This is my uncles '64 Loadstar cabover.

DSCF0309.jpg

I just bought one just like this. I'm surprised to see another grain box setup with the axle so close to the center. When you raise it the back of the box comes about 12" off the ground - not to handy for dumping into an auger. Mine is a 345 5 speed, straight axle, hydraulic brakes. I was surprised to find an 1800 with 345, I thought for sure it would have a 392. There isn't a good way for the radiator to get air, so they put a propeller on the end of the crank to deafen you while you drive. Cab is straight, no rust, decent paint, and a nice grain body for $200 - not a bad deal, I couldn't pass it up. Seeing this picture makes me want to get it out and play with it.

As you can see in the picture the paint is coming off in sheets. It looks like the cabs are made with galvanized steel and they don't seem to rust.

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