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Vintage Ads


clay neubauer

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That was the baler they had before the 77 model. The 77 had a right side pickup. The neighbours bought one in 1954 and they used to bale some of my parents hay.

Oldest I can remember is the 65 or 66 which looked much the same design as they make today although it was fifties vintage. I see I have another similar baler ad from 1949 but with a different (IH) tractor pulling it.

Doesnt look like the forage harvester is a right hand pick-up?

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Doesnt look like the forage harvester is a right hand pick-up?

It does appear to be right hand cut to me. Not that I know anything about corn harvest equipment but here is another view of a Case outfit which is also right hand cut. From 1949. Appears to be a DC3. tractor.

post-90-0-20787200-1373550217_thumb.jpg

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Gorgeous machine

BK

I sure like those anteaters.

Here is an ad from 1952 that has a personal connection. I have my uncle's 52 JD AR tractor in the shed.

post-90-0-94771100-1373610576_thumb.jpg

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Gorgeous machine

BK

I sure like those anteaters.

Here is an ad from 1952 that has a personal connection. I have my uncle's 52 JD AR tractor in the shed.

What is an AR.....is it to the "A" like a W6 is to an "M"? Deere's standard tread tractors?

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.

What is an AR.....is it to the "A" like a W6 is to an "M"? Deere's standard tread tractors?

Yes, the AR was a standard wide front tractor and probably one of their most popular next to the venerable model D. We did see the occasional model A row crop but not that many since there was no row crop farming here and no need for narrow front or three point tractors. The AR was originally an "unstyled" tractor but I think the "styled" version in my ad came out in the late forties. It had a few improvements over the D including wheel brakes, live hyd and pto.

This next photo is not really an ad but it shows that there were row crop tractors sold in Canada. These row crop Cockshutt 30s were being picked up at the factory (Brantford, Ontario) and driven home by their new owners in the spring of 49.

post-90-0-34350600-1373636291_thumb.jpg

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.

What is an AR.....is it to the "A" like a W6 is to an "M"? Deere's standard tread tractors?

Yes, the AR was a standard wide front tractor and probably one of their most popular next to the venerable model D. We did see the occasional model A row crop but not that many since there was no row crop farming here and no need for narrow front or three point tractors. The AR was originally an "unstyled" tractor but I think the "styled" version in my ad came out in the late forties. It had a few improvements over the D including wheel brakes, live hyd and pto.

This next photo is not really an ad but it shows that there were row crop tractors sold in Canada. These row crop Cockshutt 30s were being picked up at the factory (Brantford, Ontario) and driven home by their new owners in the spring of 49.

That is interesting that the AR had live hyd. and pto...........we didn't see that until the 50-60 and 70's appeared in row crop country.

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Hi: Yes the styled AR John Deere had live hydraulic, but I doubt that the PTO was live. I could be wrong, but! The hydraulic pump was mounted on top of the engine, and driven from the timing gears. It had a shifter, if I remembe correctly, and could be dis-engaged when not needed, or to make starting easier on cold mornings. These tractors could be hand-cranked if the battery died. CardaleBob.

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Hi: Yes the styled AR John Deere had live hydraulic, but I doubt that the PTO was live. I could be wrong, but! The hydraulic pump was mounted on top of the engine, and driven from the timing gears. It had a shifter, if I remembe correctly, and could be dis-engaged when not needed, or to make starting easier on cold mornings. These tractors could be hand-cranked if the battery died. CardaleBob.

Actually I was beginning to question my memory on that lpto feature on the AR as well. To be honest I have never used the pto on this one but I am pretty sure my uncles used it on the hay mower. Yes, there is a dis engagement lever for the pump. Good idea. They referred to the hydraulics as "power-trol". The ad does mention live hydraulics but no mention of live pto so maybe not an option. Something else to check out next time I start it. :P

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Quite a little hike from Brantford to just northeast of Toronto. Judging from snow on the ground it might have been a cold ride.

I was noticing the snow on the ground too and thinking, "I guess these guys don't have too far to drive". I had not checked a map.

Here is a view inside a "modern" IH dealership. Vintage 1949.

post-90-0-31773100-1373690079_thumb.jpg

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Anybody remember Saturday nights like this in small town farming country? From what I hear it was that way here. This John Deere ad from 1949 shows a glimpse of that time.

post-90-0-01347700-1373740421_thumb.jpg

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Anybody remember Saturday nights like this in small town farming country? From what I hear it was that way here. This John Deere ad from 1949 shows a glimpse of that time.

Absolutely, Ralph. Business places stayed open late and the town was full of folks visiting, youngsters running around playing. Good times. Usually a dance going on somewhere. My memories are from about 1950 to 1958 when it started to peter out. I think television did it. The "community" sort of just slid out and gone. Now things are locked up tight, the exception being the local bar. But no interaction on the street corners or such anymore. If you lived those times, you have to miss it. I do.

Ron

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Anybody remember Saturday nights like this in small town farming country? From what I hear it was that way here. This John Deere ad from 1949 shows a glimpse of that time.

Absolutely, Ralph. Business places stayed open late and the town was full of folks visiting, youngsters running around playing. Good times. Usually a dance going on somewhere. My memories are from about 1950 to 1958 when it started to peter out. I think television did it. The "community" sort of just slid out and gone. Now things are locked up tight, the exception being the local bar. But no interaction on the street corners or such anymore. If you lived those times, you have to miss it. I do.

Ron

It is a pretty dim memory for me Ron. What I remember was the dusty street "cruising" that was a common Sunday afternoon pastime for any young guy with a car and who could afford to spend his money on a few gallons of fifty cent a gallon gas. ;)

I thought I'd post this Ford truck ad from 1952 after the thread on "Family Fords" by dalej. This ad shows the designation F5 as Ford had changed over to the U.S. style by 52. Check out that big 106 hp flathead V8.

post-90-0-83839000-1373811556_thumb.jpg

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Old technology in front end loaders. This Caswell from 1949 has some interesting features. I'm going to guess it is mounted on a Farmall M.

post-90-0-54673300-1373897482_thumb.jpg

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Series 86 Tractors.

Brady Boy, I dont know if you know the answer or not. The ad with 1486 is that an IH equipt auxillary weight bracket under the front end?

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Series 86 Tractors.

Brady Boy, I dont know if you know the answer or not. The ad with 1486 is that an IH equipt auxillary weight bracket under the front end?

Sure looks like that, Bob. Never saw one in person or in other pictures. Maybe someone else will chime in.

Bill

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Old technology in front end loaders. This Caswell from 1949 has some interesting features. I'm going to guess it is mounted on a Farmall M.

With the exception of the lifting mechanism, that loader is almost identical to the one that my Dad had. I have NO idea who made it, but it had the same channel iron frame, and had ONE lift cylinder mounted on one of the frames, and a bracket mounted on the front of the tractor, with cables running over pulleys on the top of the bracket..

Those early front end loaders look like a crude piece of junk by today's standards but I guess in 1949 they were considered a huge helping hand to the farmer that needed a little extra lifting power on the farm. We have come a long way in 60 some years.

Here is another handy attachment for the other end of the tractor. A Danuser blade which appears to be mounted on a Cub, although I could be wrong as I am no expert on those old IH tractors.

post-90-0-54557300-1374001642_thumb.jpg

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