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Vintage Ads


clay neubauer

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One of the more popular cheap cabs around here in the early seventies. Built right here in Sask. The name Fibro referred to the fibreglass roof. They were better than nothing but a far cry from the newer cabs that were coming out from the major manufacturers shortly. No ROPS, no air, no sound proofing.

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This was always New Holland baler country but I hear these IH model 46 balers were pretty good. You could even buy McCormick baler twine for it. Back in 1962.

The IH 46 baler was a very popular machine here as well.

Sold as a B46 indicating they were made in Britain.

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This was always New Holland baler country but I hear these IH model 46 balers were pretty good. You could even buy McCormick baler twine for it. Back in 1962.

The IH 46 baler was a very popular machine here as well.

Sold as a B46 indicating they were made in Britain.

Yes, that B46 looks good too. I scanned this model 47 IH baler from the 1964 Buyers Guide.

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The B47 baler was also sold here.

I note it was claimed to have an output of up to 15 tons per hour while Loadstar's ad refers to 17 tons per hour - must be a down under effect on the baler.

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Betcha they changed from short tons to long tonnes.

http://www.onlineconversion.com/faq_09.htm

So a British hundred weight is actually 112 pounds? How confusing. Back some 40 years ago when the metric system was imposed on us our 2000 pound ton became a 2200 pound tonne just to add a little more confusion. Theres plenty more confusion in the metric system but I get tired of talking about it.

In this 1965 ad Ford kept it a little more simple rating their baler in bales per minute, which I think made more sense to the average farmer.

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How well I remember making hay in this manner. How times and equipment has changed. It's interesting my British cousins made hay very similarly to the way we did. And drink plenty of water out of that burlap covered gallon jug, or canvas water bag.... it's hot out there. OBG

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How well I remember making hay in this manner. How times and equipment has changed. It's interesting my British cousins made hay very similarly to the way we did. And drink plenty of water out of that burlap covered gallon jug, or canvas water bag.... it's hot out there. OBG

Somehow this post got a duplicate

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How well I remember making hay in this manner. How times and equipment has changed. It's interesting my British cousins made hay very similarly to the way we did. And drink plenty of water out of that burlap covered gallon jug, or canvas water bag.... it's hot out there. OBG

Gary, I have to say I don't miss much about that old style of hay making. The heat and dust and the permanent damage I did to my knee by handling thousands of bales is what I remember most.

Since we are talking hay machinery, here is another from 1956. An IH 300 pulling a model 45 (I think) McCormick baler.

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This is an ad for B45 & 55 balers from the mid 1950s.

I assume the B45 came from Britain and the 55 from America.

The explanation regarding the output of the 47 balers makes sense as Australia used same weight system as Britain until metric conversion. We are totally metric now.

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In 1954 IH made good use of this full page ad in the Country Guide to advertise both their model 45 baler and the new W400 tractor. Pto or engine drive options for the baler. If you wanted bigger capacity IH offered the model 55 baler which they rated at 10 tons per hour.

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Choices, choices, choices.

Which one of those had the V8?

This slightly older ad features the 4568 with the 800 cubic inch IH V8 rated at 300 engine horsepower.

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Choices, choices, choices.

Which one of those had the V8?

This slightly older ad features the 4568 with the 800 cubic inch IH V8 rated at 300 engine horsepower.

Ralph,The 4568 was what I used to have on the homestead at Lewistown. Brady Boy is correct about the 4786 and 4586 being V-8's. The 4366 was the counterpart with the 6-cylinder with my tractor, but the 6-cylinder for this series was the 4386. Gary ;)

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PS: Thanks for posting that literature! I din't have any of it.

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I also got the 1980 and 1982 Buyers Guides, the 1979 3388/3588 brochure, and the 84 series brochure. Any requests? I also found an extremely nice copy of Lee Klancher's "Farmall, the Golden Years, 1924-1954."

Bill Karis

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