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clay neubauer

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Trying to snow here today. Hope it won't be enough that we will need one of these Massey Harris snow plough attachments for the front end loader. A 1951 ad. 

 

51 MH Loaders.jpg

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Yes it is sugar cane being harvested in Australia and probably in the 1960s.

These photos are a couple of years old but same process being used. Most cane in Australia is harvested "green", that is unburnt.

DSC_2391.JPG

DSC_2403.JPG

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1 minute ago, A554 said:

Yes it is sugar cane being harvested in Australia and probably in the 1960s.

These photos are a couple of years old but same process being used. Most cane in Australia is harvested "green", that is unburnt.

DSC_2391.JPG

DSC_2403.JPG

Cool Champerlain Deere tractor

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Chamberlain tractors were manufactured in West Australia starting after WW2.

They were part owned by John Deere when the tractor in the photo was built in the 1980s. These Chamberlains were powered by JD engines.

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3 hours ago, lightninboy said:

Talk about a down-front cylinder.

Somewhere on the internet there is a picture floating around of an experimental Gleaner CII with a rotor down front just like cylinder on the regular CII.  There was two engines probably for the extra hp needs and to counter balance the rotor.  Think the picture was from the late 60s.

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Sugar cane is a giant grass. The sugar is concentrated in the stems. The harvester cuts off the leaves at the top, the stalks are cut at ground level and the cut stalk cut into approx 12 inch pieces. Trash is blown out of the harvester and is left as mulch over the plants.

Cane can be harvested several times (annualy) before cultivating and replanting.

The cut pieces are transported to a mill and crushed and heated to extract the juice and sugar.

The remaining plant trash is used to fire the boilers to generate electricity to power the mill and also sold for use by locals.

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