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Vintage Ads


clay neubauer

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5 hours ago, lightninboy said:

Don't people usually wait a while before tedding the hay?

actually it speeds up the drying process if you ted it after cutting 

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Here is a neat little tractor that I think is quite collectible now. The Massey Harris Pony. I only recall seeing one. They were too small for serious farming and nobody was going to buy a tractor to work their garden so I guess they had a limited market. This is from a 1947 Massey catalogue I happened to find. 

 

MH Pony full page.jpg

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5 minutes ago, Loadstar said:

Here is a neat little tractor that I think is quite collectible now. The Massey Harris Pony. I only recall seeing one. They were too small for serious farming and nobody was going to buy a tractor to work their garden so I guess they had a limited market. This is from a 1947 Massey catalogue I happened to find. 

 

 

I think they were more popular out here in the east where farms were smaller in the day and market gardening was common. Almost every antique tractor event, parade or fair I attend I see at least one Pony and sometimes a few. They seem to be popular with collectors who want something small due to lack of space and/or ease of transporting. Here are a few recent pictures.DSC01979.thumb.JPG.67acf1816609b320659aea0fcb97a198.JPG

IMG_0547.thumb.JPG.5a29d00986912ed11afa4b039011a507.JPGIMG_0567.thumb.JPG.c03b3b0dd2c98c4c758a90ac5089148f.JPG

The slightly larger Pacer is more rare, only produced for 3 years and is also sought after by collectors. Its larger HP makes it a little more useful. Here is an example.

IMG_0798.thumb.JPG.f7f32c89b6722795f82145e317c612b3.JPG

These were manufactured in Woodstock, ON, so I suppose that also contributed to their popularity here. They were definitely a competitor for the CUB.

Cheers

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2 hours ago, Loadstar said:

Here is a neat little tractor that I think is quite collectible now. The Massey Harris Pony. I only recall seeing one. They were too small for serious farming and nobody was going to buy a tractor to work their garden so I guess they had a limited market. This is from a 1947 Massey catalogue I happened to find.

I’ve only seen one too.  On small tractor subject around here the Farmall A actually was somewhat popular giving that this was big wheat country.  Guys used them for gardens, cultivating shelterbelts, and mowing hay with an under mount sickle.  My great uncle had the one in the pic below.  He also farmed with a TD-14A crawler and later in a pair WD-9s.  My grandpa drove an A working for a ranch one summer mowing hay.  Even though this is big wheat country there was still a place for small rowcrop tractors.

424D6767-695C-402E-BE12-E95D8C6C85E2.jpeg

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9 hours ago, Big Bud guy said:

I’ve only seen one too.  On small tractor subject around here the Farmall A actually was somewhat popular giving that this was big wheat country.  Guys used them for gardens, cultivating shelterbelts, and mowing hay with an under mount sickle.  My great uncle had the one in the pic below.  He also farmed with a TD-14A crawler and later in a pair WD-9s.  My grandpa drove an A working for a ranch one summer mowing hay.  Even though this is big wheat country there was still a place for small rowcrop tractors.

 

It was my uncle that had the MH Pony, plus some implements. He also had a Cub. It was close to 50 years ago. I was just old enough to realize what a neat little tractor it would be for a kid like me to drive. Unfortunately my dad didn't have money to spare for "toy tractors" at that time. My uncle was into buying and re-selling so I don't think the tractors stayed with him for long. I'd like to have them in my shed now but I'd need a bigger shed. 

Look at how cheap storage space was back in the 1960s. From the Beaver lumber catalogue I see a 40x48 foot arch rafter style for $2000 (materials only). 

 

Beaver arch.jpg

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11 hours ago, Big Bud guy said:

I’ve only seen one too.  On small tractor subject around here the Farmall A actually was somewhat popular giving that this was big wheat country.  Guys used them for gardens, cultivating shelterbelts, and mowing hay with an under mount sickle.  My great uncle had the one in the pic below.  He also farmed with a TD-14A crawler and later in a pair WD-9s.  My grandpa drove an A working for a ranch one summer mowing hay.  Even though this is big wheat country there was still a place for small rowcrop tractors.

424D6767-695C-402E-BE12-E95D8C6C85E2.jpeg

Your great uncle had a sort of Paul Newman look on his face in this shot.

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Hard for me to believe but it is 7 years ago today that this vintage ads thread began. I wasn't there for the very beginning but have been a fairly regular poster. Still haven't run out of vintage ads. I scanned this one today. In the world of $50,000 new pickup trucks it is almost impossible to think you could buy a brand new F-100 in 1969 for $2295.00. It looks like a pretty basic truck with the 240 straight six and "3 on the tree"

 

69 Ford new.jpg

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1 hour ago, Eric V Bielke said:

I bought a 1972 Ford F100 4 X 4 360- 4 sp for 2400 in Jan 1972

Everything (including the gas in the tank) is more expensive here in Canada. Here is an ad showing your 72 Ford pickup that "works like a truck, rides like a car". They were very popular trucks here in Western Canada. 

72 Ford pickups.jpg

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I always liked the looks of these early IH four wheel drive tractors. This is a 1970 magazine shot of the small 4156. Little brother to the big 4300. 

 

4156 in 70.jpg

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3 minutes ago, IHhogfarmer said:

Loadstar is that IH February message a one page thing or does it have multiple pages? 

 

It is just a single page ad appeared in Canadian Farm Equipment magazine. The clever art work makes it look like a stack of multiple pages. 

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I see. As I was looking at it I was wondering what it was like.

Recently I found a yard stick that my grandpa has from the old IH dealer here it states “Good equipment makes a good farmer better” I would guess that yard stick is not to far off from the age of that ad  

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