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clay neubauer

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The guy dad bought his 4000 swather from said when it was new. He priced. A few self propelled swathers. But he got the operating weights of the machines and the story he tells is the 4000 was one of the cheapest per lb of weight. Don’t know if it was true but makes for a good story.

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8 hours ago, IHhogfarmer said:

It looks to me like a 75 foot Draper head could make one big windrow. If that’s the case I would imagine you couldn’t use one in very heavy crop conditions. Neat add though. 

I don’t really have any ads for Hesston swathers but I have a issue of Heritage Iron Magazine that talks about how Hesston got their start and about the swathers  that followed decades after. Mechanically it doesn’t talk much of how the model 100 swather works but it was introduced in 1955 by Lyle Yost, the company founder, after management(I assume Hesston management) purchased a self-propelled swather concept from a tractor dealer and a machine owner in Iowa and the model 100 was introduced as the first commercially self-propelled swather in the industry. Then in 1959 an new model, the 220 was introduced. 

I used to have a Hesston 50th anniversary magazine they put out in the late 90s.  It went in to detail how they got started and the swather.  I lost that magazine a long time ago.  Hesston for awhile was kind like the M&W of combines with all that upgrades they offered for various brands like unloading augers and finger augers.  That claim of being the first commercial SP swather on the market is either false or maybe they are just talking the US.  Because Versatile, Killbery, and maybe a few others all had swathers on the market before 1955. 

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32 minutes ago, Big Bud guy said:

I used to have a Hesston 50th anniversary magazine they put out in the late 90s.  It went in to detail how they got started and the swather.  I lost that magazine a long time ago.  Hesston for awhile was kind like the M&W of combines with all that upgrades they offered for various brands like unloading augers and finger augers.  That claim of being the first commercial SP swather on the market is either false or maybe they are just talking the US.  Because Versatile, Killbery, and maybe a few others all had swathers on the market before 1955. 

Its true. Kilberry is about the oldest name in swathers I can remember. A neighbour did some swathing for my dad in the 1950s with his new Kilberry swather. I was too young to remember what it looked like but maybe like the one in this 1953 ad. 

 

53 Grain Saver swather.jpg

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1 hour ago, dale560 said:

Where were the ihc 4000built in Canada? The Macdon drive units sure have a resemblence but upgraded appearance to how the 4000 was engineered.

Thats a good question. I know the 4/5000 have pretty much zero in common with the Macdon. Now the CIH 6000 and 6500 were Macdon machines

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Big bud guy and loadstar, thanks for the correction I guess I should have done a little research before I posted?

I did a quick search on the older swathers and didn’t find much from the early 50’s but I did see a picture of a Minneapolis-Moline self-propelled swather the SP-101. 

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20 minutes ago, IHhogfarmer said:

Big bud guy and loadstar, thanks for the correction I guess I should have done a little research before I posted?

I did a quick search on the older swathers and didn’t find much from the early 50’s but I did see a picture of a Minneapolis-Moline self-propelled swather the SP-101. 

I wasn’t getting after you.  I too remember that magazine I referred to making the claim Hesston had the first SP swather.  It wouldn’t be he first time a manufacture had made a false claim.  

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3 hours ago, Loadstar said:

Its true. Kilberry is about the oldest name in swathers I can remember. A neighbour did some swathing for my dad in the 1950s with his new Kilberry swather. I was too young to remember what it looked like but maybe like the one in this 1953 ad. 

There is a Kilberry Swather in the Ag-Museum in Austin Manitoba. I think I posted this pic before but here its again:

009_07.thumb.jpg.aa701dc4dead273c55cec5c47fedefe2.jpg010_08.thumb.jpg.a1715ad418a59e9836ee25bddc3698fe.jpg012_10.thumb.jpg.70d68b68f0e3297409c2723ea7c57642.jpg011_09.thumb.jpg.4126f375cb42ef5720d81a3b0f1d60c8.jpg

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10 hours ago, dale560 said:

Where were the ihc 4000built in Canada? The Macdon drive units sure have a resemblence but upgraded appearance to how the 4000 was engineered.

The 4000/5000 windrowers were built in IH Hamilton Works, Hamilton Ontario, Canada. They were very popular here in Ontario.

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8 hours ago, U-C said:

There is a Kilberry Swather in the Ag-Museum in Austin Manitoba. I think I posted this pic before but here its again:

 

That i.d. plate confirms what I was thinking. In the back of my mind I had an idea that Kilberry eventually became Macdon and there it is. 

I happen to have this Oliver brochure showing their 1954 self propelled swather.  Looks pretty similar to the Kilberry. Its true these swathers look crude and inefficient by today's standards. But for the guy that was moving up from horses , binders and stooking sheaves, a self propelled Kilberry swather must have looked like a giant step forward into the future. 

 

54 Oliver swather.jpg

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I like that the Wisconsin V-4 could be had with electric start as an option, that way you could run down the battery trying to get it restarted, instead of wearing yourself out pulling on the rope trying.

Although our old bulk cement trailers had these same V-4 motors, with electric start, and I really do not remember them giving trouble when it came to start them before a job,  but we were required to make sure they would start before leaving the yard, and to immediately start them again when we got to location.

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The early kilberry had a double swath capability also.. talking of versatile swathers this thread helped us out. The other day when googling 440 versatile we came across a 4400 with Diesel engine. It has been parked for a while but we gave 600 for it and I want to use the engine to fix a 160 versatile now to drag it home a 100 miles get the engine out and get rid of the rest.

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3 minutes ago, Art From DeLeon said:

I like that the Wisconsin V-4 could be had with electric start as an option, that way you could run down the battery trying to get it restarted, instead of wearing yourself out pulling on the rope trying.

Although our old bulk cement trailers had these same V-4 motors, with electric start, and I really do not remember them giving trouble when it came to start them before a job,  but we were required to make sure they would start before leaving the yard, and to immediately start them again when we got to location.

 

1 minute ago, dale560 said:

The early kilberry had a double swath capability also.. talking of versatile swathers this thread helped us out. The other day when googling 440 versatile we came across a 4400 with Diesel engine. It has been parked for a while but we gave 600 for it and I want to use the engine to fix a 160 versatile

Sounds like a real deal on the 4400 if the engine is any good at all. I did not know the 4400 had a diesel option. All I ever saw had the 200 Ford gas engine. 

Art, I think the later Wisconsins with distributor ignition were better starting than the old magneto type. I don't recall the swathers being hard to start. Biggest downfall was leaving them sit out unprotected from the weather. If water got down the exhaust it would stick the valves by the time next harvest rolled around. 

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Just now, Loadstar said:

 

Sounds like a real deal on the 4400 if the engine is any good at all. I did not know the 4400 had a diesel option. All I ever saw had the 200 Ford gas engine. 

Art, I think the later Wisconsins with distributor ignition were better starting than the old magneto type. I don't recall the swathers being hard to start. Biggest downfall was leaving them sit out unprotected from the weather. If water got down the exhaust it would stick the valves by the time next harvest rolled around. 

Yes they used the same Waukesha but non turbo as the 160.just for a year or 2 The motor might be iffy in the swather but I can use it to make one out of two. 

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Well I guess I shouldn’t believe everything I read but it is still good for me to get corrected by guys with more experience that me?

Back to the Hesston swathers I found a diagram that show how the 500 Auger header windrower operated and some of the features it had when it was introduced in 1962. Both pics are 500’s

 

EFEF0237-B6CA-4C99-AB03-4CF979CEED63.jpeg

0209F46C-B621-44EF-AB94-3FBEF56A3455.jpeg

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12 hours ago, George 2 said:

The 4000/5000 windrowers were built in IH Hamilton Works, Hamilton Ontario, Canada. They were very popular here in Ontario.

here are a few IH pictures of Canadian production. circa 1968

first one is Hamilton Works products, next 2 are Chatham Works circa 1968 as well

ih ham.jpg

ih chat 2.jpg

ih chat.jpg

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9 hours ago, IHhogfarmer said:

Well I guess I shouldn’t believe everything I read but it is still good for me to get corrected by guys with more experience that me?

 

yeah,  Big Bud Guy is the one that will  get me every time but its all good, ..... he is a smart fellar:huh:

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Nice photos, Hillman. Yes Hamilton built a wide range of products back in 1968. They also built the 3414 loader tractor and the 500 crawler at the same time. I remember an interview I had with Hamilton Product Engineering in 1969 and was impressed with the wide range of products built there and the quality checks they had in manufacturing. Certainly the opposite to what I experienced the following year at John Deere in Welland.  

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3 hours ago, hillman said:

yeah,  Big Bud Guy is the one that will  get me every time but its all good, ..... he is a smart fellar:huh:

Makes you wish you were that smart? oh well for me it’s just a glimpse of what the real world is like ?

I really like the ad of the Hamilton Works product line 

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these pictures are from a booklet " A Visit to International Harvester in Hamilton" I have driven around down there and there is still a few of the buildings . Larry Smith said he would drive through with me and pin point the buildings sometime but I have not got around to it yet

 

 

ih prod3.jpg

ih prod6.jpg

ih prod7.jpg

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