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clay neubauer

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3 minutes ago, KeithFink said:

Wow! That one's a keeper. What era?

Keith-

The D 115 A was made from 1971-1975 only 64 tractors were made of this model. The Driver is the late Max Huerlimann the youngest son of the founder Hans Huerlimann (1901-1977)

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Hürlimann D 210 Synchromatic Brochure the tractor had 77 Engine Horsepower. There was also a D 210 with a standard transmission5ab59f3a2348a_Original-Prospekt-vom-HRLIMANN-Traktor-D-210-mit-77.thumb.jpg.30172cbedc4c0944443d57df41d9f204.jpg

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On 3/22/2018 at 1:30 PM, U-C said:

MF 35 Brochure

Looks pretty similar to the North American version except for the big fenders. 

Here is a 1660 combine ad but not the model you might think of . One of the last real Case combines. About 1970. 

Case 1660.jpg

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34 minutes ago, Loadstar said:

Looks pretty similar to the North American version except for the big fenders. 

Here is a 1660 combine ad but not the model you might think of . One of the last real Case combines. About 1970. 

 

Now that is one 1660 I wouldn't mind just for fun.  Funny that they left JD out of that spec comparison.  Or more specifically the 105 or 7700. 

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2 hours ago, Loadstar said:

Looks pretty similar to the North American version except for the big fenders. 

Here is a 1660 combine ad but not the model you might think of . One of the last real Case combines. About 1970. 

 

That with the fenders is true in some areas in Europe you were able to get fenders with seats on them. That is an awesome CASE combine I always wondered why Case stopped making them.

 

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I guess I'll just throw this unrelated Kern Farm Equipment ad in here. Interesting to see that back in 1952 the world depended on you, that is to say, me, the farmer. I suppose to some extent the world does still depend on us as people still need to eat. But you don't hear much about it anymore. As long as we keep on producing without going broke nobody will worry too much. 

Kern Farm Equipment was a local short line equipment importer back in those days. They sold a lot of interesting farm equipment. 

 

52 Kern Farmer.jpg

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Hürlimann H 360 Brochure the tractor had 60 engine horsepower and was one of the last Hürlimann tractor models assembled in the Hürlimann tractor plant before it got closet down by the new owners in 1983 and moved production to Italy (SAME group same company that made tractors for White and later for AGCO). Below is a pic of the Hürlimann plant that got closet down in 1983 and sold to a Semi truck repair company.

5abc1401659a8_HuerlimannWerkhalle.thumb.jpg.82565f69bfd3d5bb30353460a7998343.jpg5abc11f0b91f2_HuerlimannH360.jpg.1a301fab4180927ac2cefb5dcf56906c.jpg

My grandfather had one like this but with a cab

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19 minutes ago, lightninboy said:

Oh, what tractors were they?

The White Tractors made by the Same Group were this models 6045, 6065, 6085, 6105

for AGCO Allis they were this models: 4650, 4660, 5650, 5660, 5670, 5680, 6670, 6680, 6690, 7600, 7630, 7650, 8610, 8630

For AGCO Tractors the GT series: GT45, GT55, GT65, GT75

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On 3/29/2018 at 5:53 PM, Art From DeLeon said:

Talk about an orphan 

DSCN1786_662.JPG.f579a6fec00f18a7b3489eb77b2e7ebb.JPG

Walsh, Colorado, April of 2015

That's Awesome, not many Hürlimann's were sold in North America even rarer are the Originals (that is what I call the Swiss Made ones lol). Here is a Brochure of a FAHR Swather

5abedebbaecf7_orig-Prospekt-Fahr-Zapfwellen-Schwadmher-SW1-Schlepper-Traktor.thumb.jpg.1d0ae090b53226bde162e7e4fdc4dacf.jpgorig-Prospekt-Fahr-Zapfwellen-Schwadmaher-SW1-Schlepper-Traktor-_57.thumb.jpg.f231f3f95a2f3c96a0bbe509eea1fd4f.jpg 

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21 minutes ago, U-C said:

Here is a Brochure of a FAHR Swather

 

Looks typical of the older pull type swathers with that end delivery. Biggest problem with that was in our country of twists and turns , on a gradual left turn the swath would drop right into the track left by the right side tractor wheel. Left it sometimes heads down and very hard to pick up. Also more subject to soaking and hard to dry out. Of course there was no room to make them centre delivery until they started building at least 18 foot pull types. They they had a short canvas on the left that carried the swath a little further to the right making it almost centre delivery. A big improvement. 

Here is an old IH McCormick pull type 120 swather from 1955. 

 

55 IH 120 windrower.jpg

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10 hours ago, lightninboy said:

End-delivery pull-type swather is good to me, one less canvas, even double-swathed with it, self-contained hydraulics, low power requirements.

Maybe ok if you have square, flat, level fields but like I said, here in pothole country we are so often working on a gradual curve. And if it is a left hand curve that swath is going to fall into the "rut" left by the right tractor wheel. Heads down, difficult if not impossible to pick up. I remember it well even after nearly 30 years. Centre delivery eliminated that problem. And those self contained hydraulics worked but I can still remember the shoulder pain after a long day of  reaching back to work those levers on my uncle's pull type Cockshutt swather. If it was mine I would have converted it to tractor hydraulics right away. 

Still probably easier than this 1950 model 2 pull type that had no hydraulics at all. Straight mechanical "armstrong" table and reel lift. I'd bet there was not a lot of adjusting on the go on those machines. 

1950 Cockshutt 2 swather.jpg

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I have a manual for that IH windrower.  We ditched our pull type swather in 1965 and bought a new Massey 34.  The year before we had bought a new Massey 510 so we were living high.  Problem with a pull type besides knocking wheat down on the first round was they didn't track very good in the hills. 

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On 3/30/2018 at 8:30 PM, Loadstar said:

Looks typical of the older pull type swathers with that end delivery. Biggest problem with that was in our country of twists and turns , on a gradual left turn the swath would drop right into the track left by the right side tractor wheel. Left it sometimes heads down and very hard to pick up. Also more subject to soaking and hard to dry out. Of course there was no room to make them centre delivery until they started building at least 18 foot pull types. They they had a short canvas on the left that carried the swath a little further to the right making it almost centre delivery. A big improvement. 

Here is an old IH McCormick pull type 120 swather from 1955. 

 

55 IH 120 windrower.jpg

Swathing was not so common in Western Europe for grains but for a while Rapeseed was swathed. I get what you mean with does end delivery type swathers. I have seen pics and also in a youtube video that had a front mount swather here is a link of it it starts around the 7:48 minute mark. This video also has a scene of using a field chopper to thresh grain its about 90% effective in threshing out the grain. The only thing the threshing machine does is cleaning.

 

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