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For Keith Scott about why Cockshutt never made it to Australia, I offer the following. Back about 20 years ago I had a long talk with Bill Cockshutt at the Ilderton, ON tractor show. One of the things he mentioned was how Cockshutt was expanding it's product line and specifically their presence in the United States during the 1950's. In fact he was stationed at the Kansas City branch for a time. The problem was always finding enough money to grow and expand the company. And that is what got them in trouble with the investors. The investors wanted larger dividends and didn't get them. Finally, they revolted and you know the rest of the story. One area they were also looking at was Australia. However he said Australia had large tariffs and both IH and Massey in order to avoid them started local manufacturing in Australia. Cockshutt realized that unless they did local manufacturing there, they wouldn't be competitive on price. But they didn't have the money to develop both the US and Australian markets at the same time. The Australian market would have required them to set up local manufacturing. So they concentrated on the US market and built a plant at Bellevue, OH to fully enter the American market first. However they never got the chance to develop a market in Australia since the investors sold them out in the late 1950's. That is what I remember from the discussion with Bill. Sadly he passed away a few weeks back.          

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9 hours ago, Keith_Scott said:

Load star where did you find this puzzle? I have been looking for one for the last three years. This picture was taken just west of Alexander Manitoba. Those are my uncles and grandfather’s combines. I can’t tell you how much time I have spent looking at the puzzle framed on his wall

That jigsaw puzzle turned up in a second store here years ago. Its the only one I've ever seen. A real classic. Interesting to hear from somebody that actually knows something about the picture. Hope you get lucky and find another one somewhere. 

 

Cockshutt 658 loader.jpg

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I have never seen any Cockshutt tractors in Australia. I worked on a farm in Manitoba in 1979 and drove a gas powered 50 and really liked that old tractor.

Cockshutts were advertised in Australia in the late 1950s and early 1960s. Here is a scan of the diesel 50 in the Power Farming Technical Annual of 1960 together with a list of dealers around Australia. perhaps this is as far as they went in coming to Australia.

 

 

img20180314_17395895.jpg

img20180314_17405469.jpg

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5 hours ago, Loadstar said:

That jigsaw puzzle turned up in a second store here years ago. Its the only one I've ever seen. A real classic. Interesting to hear from somebody that actually knows something about the picture. Hope you get lucky and find another one somewhere. 

 

Cockshutt 658 loader.jpg

Thanks. And you were right about the co-op combine in the picture. The only difference was the paint and that one had a wider header

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9 hours ago, A554 said:

I have never seen any Cockshutt tractors in Australia. I worked on a farm in Manitoba in 1979 and drove a gas powered 50 and really liked that old tractor.

Cockshutts were advertised in Australia in the late 1950s and early 1960s. Here is a scan of the diesel 50 in the Power Farming Technical Annual of 1960 together with a list of dealers around Australia. perhaps this is as far as they went in coming to Australia.

 

 

img20180314_17395895.jpg

img20180314_17405469.jpg

The Cockshutt 50 was last manufactured in 1957. It was replaced by the 570 in 1958 and later the 570 Super. I suspect that was an old advertisement if it was in 1960. 

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1 hour ago, George 2 said:

The Cockshutt 50 was last manufactured in 1957. It was replaced by the 570 in 1958 and later the 570 Super. I suspect that was an old advertisement if it was in 1960. 

That 50 in the ad from Aus is just like the one my dad bought as a 56 model , although it was more like a 53 according to the serial. Same fenders and wheels too. Notice it is dark, probably red paint too? Cockshutt went to yellow hoods in I think 56. Maybe like Ford cars they were a little behind the times. This ad for a 1957 Ford in Australia is clearly what would be a 1956 model in North America. 

57 Aus Customline.jpg

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13 hours ago, Loadstar said:

That jigsaw puzzle turned up in a second store here years ago. Its the only one I've ever seen. A real classic. Interesting to hear from somebody that actually knows something about the picture. Hope you get lucky and find another one somewhere. 

 

Cockshutt 658 loader.jpg

We have a mm spreader in the trees wonder if cockshut was made at same factory.

8BEF6678-F93F-482B-868A-58F6F153B1F1.jpeg

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16 hours ago, IHhogfarmer said:

In the last picture what is the purpose of the setup with the frame going around the rear tires and hooked to the planter hitch? I've never seen it before

Don’t know.  I’m not a rowcrop farmer.  I will look through the magazine when I get home to see if I can find anything.

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This was a way of pulling a pair of planters, disks, or field cultivators in the days when farmers were moving from 4-row (12-15 foot) size to tractors that were capable of pulling larger sizes.

This picture shows two 6-row 30 inch 694 AN or 695 AN planters (the six row had two full size fertilizer boxes and two half-sized dry fertilizer boxes) I had not seen this  picture before, but the ads I had seen showed two 4-row 494 (A) or 495 (A) planters behind a 4020.  As you can see in the picture the semi circular hitch was built like a roller drawbar with two short drawbars where the planter tongues attached,  that allowed the planters to follow.   I also do not know if there was a provision to pull one implement behind the other for transport, since you can see the reflector/warning light on the outer end of the hitch assembly. (I am sure that there was since a 12 row 30" planter would be close to 30 feet wide)  I also do not know how the two implements were tied together to keep the proper spacing between them.

 

Another thing that I do not know is what the rope is for that extends from one end of the planter to the other, unless it has something to do with the folding markersBF-1968-1.jpg.f18196dc8a3c5d5790723ebdde2714e9.jpg.62eef6b3085ed41e2781fe2c911d878f.jpg

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Pictures are extremely hard to come by, and whoever posted the partial picture of the operators manual needs to be introduced to The Bash' rusty Tee-post.

JDCircleHitch.JPG.9914ab66e858a7ac0b4a344ef47b5529.JPG

D7K_2719HalfCentury.jpg.fdb63cc00ada59b3bb581478f327d8f0.jpg

According to the caption, this ^^^^^ was at a HCOP, but the year was not given.

 

A man in North Dakota will build a person one of the toy hitches, as I inquired about having one made several years ago, and the price he quoted, (using one of my Precision 4020's and my Precision 494A planter) was $1200.  I would like to see how he did the markers to have them the proper length.

5aa998d8129d3_images(2).jpg.6aeb337a29d2fd00c8715fc91e445249.jpg

You will also see that there were two different styles, one with a round pipe frame, and the other, later with the rectangular cross piece, and the attaching braces.

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2 hours ago, dale560 said:

We have a mm spreader in the trees wonder if cockshut was made at same factory.

8BEF6678-F93F-482B-868A-58F6F153B1F1.jpeg

It is possible but unlikely Dale. the ad was no newer than 1961 ( before Cockshutt was gutted) MM and Cockshutt had no corporate ties up to that time

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13 hours ago, mike_newman said:

Actually...it was a Ford "Prefect ".......not perfect

I had the two words mixed up lol, thanks for the correction

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1 hour ago, Art From DeLeon said:

Another thing that I do not know is what the rope is for that extends from one end of the planter to the other, unless it has something to do with the folding markers

Thanks for the info Art I wonder if there was an advantage over that setup versus the regular Hitch kit that was put on later drills and planters. 

This may answer you question about the rope going across the planter. With This 1/16 scale custom set up there is two ropes and they tie to the rope going across the drill in two different places and then that must control the markers. There is an article about this, they said it was used in the late 60’s and early 70’s and the tractor is a 4320, it also says the disc is a 14-foot JD BWA and the drill is two JD PDA 7- foot pony press drills. Maybe Big Bud Guy would know a little more about this 

5A0F1B69-A213-47A9-A5BE-0DCCFE53BF98.jpeg

B5E5B474-7F7F-49B3-8978-C4E63A7D359F.jpeg

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1 hour ago, IHhogfarmer said:

Thanks for the info Art I wonder if there was an advantage over that setup versus the regular Hitch kit that was put on later drills and planters. 

This may answer you question about the rope going across the planter. With This 1/16 scale custom set up there is two ropes and they tie to the rope going across the drill in two different places and then that must control the markers. There is an article about this, they said it was used in the late 60’s and early 70’s and the tractor is a 4320, it also says the disc is a 14-foot JD BWA and the drill is two JD PDA 7- foot pony press drills. Maybe Big Bud Guy would know a little more about this 

 

 

I know nothing about those setups.  In my part of the world this is what we did for double hookups.  A chisel plow or duckfoot with press wheel grain drills behind it.  Nice scan. 

JD8640-1.jpg

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On 2017-06-05 at 9:46 PM, Loadstar said:

I don't know the story as to why Cockshutts never made it to Australia. 

This is not an ad but a picture that does show the similarities (identical) between the Cockshutt and Co-op combines in the 1950s. Two Cockshutts on the left and a Co-op on the right. I'm not sure on the model number but think these are the 428 combines. The last ones to have the engine down under the grain pan. 

combine puzzle.jpg

I was talking about this picture with my dad last night and he was saying that all three of the combines in this picture were sold as co-op combines but two were never painted 

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On 3/14/2018 at 7:02 PM, Big Bud guy said:

I know nothing about those setups.  In my part of the world this is what we did for double hookups.  A chisel plow or duckfoot with press wheel grain drills behind it.  Nice scan. 

 

Here is was more pre working with a cultivator and then come back next day with the drills. Multiple press drill hook up from 1971 in this ad. 

 

71 JD drills.jpg

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On ‎3‎/‎14‎/‎2018 at 3:07 PM, dale560 said:

We have a mm spreader in the trees wonder if cockshut was made at same factory.

8BEF6678-F93F-482B-868A-58F6F153B1F1.jpeg

That spreader looks like  it could be the one manufactured by SCHULTZ out of Iowa  we sold them under the Schultz name in the 60s and 70s  the tandem was ridged  just 2 axles bolted solid to the frame. That one was the fancy one ,box extensions ,upper beater attachment and tandems , maybe was rated ate 175 bu or so I don't remember what the extensions added. As our neighbor was a Moline dealer we have seen a few around here.

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