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clay neubauer

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Here is the same model picker in the field----------picture taken in Coahoma County, Mississippi (circa 1948)

 

58bca5e1575da_Mcottonpicker_HBarnes.jpg.31e48bc40cbe3dd8ff7fdadea0909cca.jpg

 

(not exactly an advertisments Ralph-----------but maybe helpful in answering the question)------------just to make it an advertisment;  I will add:   "Buy Cotton---------wear jeans!!!!!"

 

DD

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Boy those things look more dangerous than a picker . .....

Thanks for sharing this with us

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Anson seems like I remember you posting that "diagram" of the picker before. Thanks! And like you say, whether it be a 1940's one row IH or a modern day 8 row JD picker, they are basically the same. On a side note, JD is the only remaining manufacturer of cotton strippers.Not positive but I think 1988 was the last year for IH.

Not really a ad, but just a pic of a new JD stripper.

 

JD 7460.jpg

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18 hours ago, Delta Dirt said:

Here is the same model picker in the field----------picture taken in Coahoma County, Mississippi (circa 1948)

 

 

 

(not exactly an advertisments Ralph-----------but maybe helpful in answering the question)------------just to make it an advertisment;  I will add:   "Buy Cotton---------wear jeans!!!!!"

 

DD

Its close enough to an ad for me. Blue jeans are almost a uniform requirement for me here on the farm. Underneath coveralls of course. The big name in blue jeans when I was a kid was GWG (Great Western Garment co.) as seen in this ad from 1958. 

 

Cowboy Kings for 58.jpg

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17 hours ago, bitty said:

Boy those things look more dangerous than a picker . .....

Thanks for sharing this with us

 They weren't to bad to handle . Had to remember front wheel was on back .lol

  As for picker I think worst accidents were running into cotton trailers.

  As for human accidents it was being in too big a hurry .  Many a farmer or driver got his leg caught in rotating spindles while servicing or during plug ups . The spindles would wrap around the pant legs  just like it did the lint.  I actually had a relative that caught his leg, out in a remote field  and thank God the spindle had wrap his pants and plugged hole on his leg from bleeding out before paramedics arrived. 

     Tony

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13 hours ago, twostepn2001 said:

   I found this several months ago, not sure if you'd call it a ad, l think more like a press release but anyway......a JD CP20 1 row cotton picker.

 

 

That is surprising to see they build something for the smaller operators. Here it seems there is nothing new for the small farmer. Its either big time farming with huge equipment or else lawn and acreage equipment. 

Back in 72 this was one of the most popular swathers (windrowers if you prefer) in Western Canada. Versatile built them in various header sizes but all with the same reliable and proven power unit. Simple hydro drive and dependable Ford 200 cubic inch six cylinder. They sure sold a lot of them here in Sask. 

 

72 Vers 400.jpg

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TwoStep- - -

Never have seen your small one row J- D;- - - - - seems highly unusual for modern times.

Am wondering if that small scale picker wasn't aimed at a foreign market or maybe test plot work???  Over this way- - - - - - seems that every segment of growing cotton has continuously gone toward larger scale/higher volume ever since we left hand picking.

Don't know if I picked too much or not enuff of it- - - - - - - but I got "poor enough to retire" from farming back in the mid 80's.:blush::wacko:

I see it states that the basket volume is stated in liters with manual dumped basket as standard - - - - - with optional hydraulic dump??

DD

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34 minutes ago, Loadstar said:

That is surprising to see they build something for the smaller operators. Here it seems there is nothing new for the small farmer. Its either big time farming with huge equipment or else lawn and acreage equipment. 

Back in 72 this was one of the most popular swathers (windrowers if you prefer) in Western Canada. Versatile built them in various header sizes but all with the same reliable and proven power unit. Simple hydro drive and dependable Ford 200 cubic inch six cylinder. They sure sold a lot of them here in Sask. 

 

72 Vers 400.jpg

I  know dad had 3 of those versatile swathers. He had an 18 ft like that and an 18 ft ih 175 he traded the 175 for a 20 ft 400. They ran the two for a few years then he bought a newer 400 with the straight exhaust pipe. They ran two 20 fts until the mid 80s than we just ran the later one. The later ones were the same looking but had a lot of different stuff on them. I can't stress enough how I hated running that 400.  With one we tried to get a 100 acres a day done sometimes not and some days you could cut a 160. The 160 days were 6:30 am to 10:00 pm with a five minute stop for gas and lunch. Did I stress how much I hated that 400 they were a good outfit but bugs and dust were your enemy. We even had a special built trailer to back it on with cradles for the wheels to transport it if you needed to go over 5 miles.

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49 minutes ago, Loadstar said:

That is surprising to see they build something for the smaller operators. Here it seems there is nothing new for the small farmer. Its either big time farming with huge equipment or else lawn and acreage equipment. 

Back in 72 this was one of the most popular swathers (windrowers if you prefer) in Western Canada. Versatile built them in various header sizes but all with the same reliable and proven power unit. Simple hydro drive and dependable Ford 200 cubic inch six cylinder. They sure sold a lot of them here in Sask. 

 

72 Vers 400.jpg

I spent thousands of hours on one of those. Good reliable machine but like any non cab swather, it was a hot, dusty, buggy miserable thing to run. 

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1 hour ago, 65806 said:

I spent thousands of hours on one of those. Good reliable machine but like any non cab swather, it was a hot, dusty, buggy miserable thing to run. 

Dad actually bought a used cab for his but we never put it on. After he got rid of the versatile , he advertised it and about 5 months later a guy drove up 600 miles from around Rochester Mn and bought it. We now use pull type swathers when we rarely swath and dad has a 4000 IHC self propelled.

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3 hours ago, Loadstar said:

That is surprising to see they build something for the smaller operators. Here it seems there is nothing new for the small farmer. Its either big time farming with huge equipment or else lawn and acreage equipment. 

Back in 72 this was one of the most popular swathers (windrowers if you prefer) in Western Canada. Versatile built them in various header sizes but all with the same reliable and proven power unit. Simple hydro drive and dependable Ford 200 cubic inch six cylinder. They sure sold a lot of them here in Sask. 

 

72 Vers 400.jpg

There's a pile of them around in Manitoba too! Not many used now but you pretty much see them at every old yard along any back road here. We have 2 for parts and 2 running with cabs. I know one neighbour has 2 running ones that don't get used anymore. Another neighbour has 2, another has 1, and so on lol. Actually now that I think about it there's a lot of them still being used every year here. 

Anyway really reliable units, just built a little bit light. I know I can fix the double drive chain with my eyes closed. But boy do they ever cut when they're going. That's the machine I learned to cut with. They don't get used much now since 20' is too small and we got a haybine so the 15' sits now.

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14 minutes ago, db1486 said:

There's a pile of them around in Manitoba too! Not many used now but you pretty much see them at every old yard along any back road here. We have 2 for parts and 2 running with cabs. I know one neighbour has 2 running ones that don't get used anymore. Another neighbour has 2, another has 1, and so on lol. Actually now that I think about it there's a lot of them still being used every year here. 

Anyway really reliable units, just built a little bit light. I know I can fix the double drive chain with my eyes closed. But boy do they ever cut when they're going. That's the machine I learned to cut with. They don't get used much now since 20' is too small and we got a haybine so the 15' sits now.

We used to keep a box of parts on hand for the newer one. The shaft that both gears and chains run on would break. Axle and bearings and double drive chain gave problems.The straight mufflers had a direct mount motor drive instead of belt driven and they seemed to be harder on chains. Those ford motors are tough though. And one time the ball joint for the steering connection broke and you start spinning in circles. Dads was a double swath so head gave some trouble at times.

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10 minutes ago, dale560 said:

We used to keep a box of parts on hand for the newer one. The shaft that both gears and chains run on would break. Axle and bearings and double drive chain gave problems.The straight mufflers had a direct mount motor drive instead of belt driven and they seemed to be harder on chains. Those ford motors are tough though. And one time the ball joint for the steering connection broke and you start spinning in circles. Dads was a double swath so head gave some trouble at times.

Yes axles were another weak spot. I don't think we ever broke one but many guys did. Had one slide out on a side hills, but never broken. Although dad always told me keep both wheels rolling when you turn.  I do think that helped. Those drive chains used to break on the flat ground, but more often on a side hills or in mud. Side hills was the worst cause we'd have to block everything up to jack up the broken side. Then crawl underneath and put the connector in trying not to drop the center links or the clip. All while wondering if something is going to slide out of place. Ugh. Bringing back memories now lol. 

The direct mount motors you mean the hydro drive motors? Those were '80 and newer I believe. I didnt find it worse than the older ones for breaking chains. Our 77 that we cut hay with used to break them steady. New chain and sprockets didn't help either. But the '81 used to break them just as often, but then it was usually wet and pushing it on the hills. 

Never had any motor or hydro issues with any of our 400s. Had to weld stuff and some pitman trouble but keep things serviced and they cut a pile of acres for us. And lots of weight on the back end for our hills!!! Had a city friend out for harvest one year and he was riding on the 400 with dad. I guess he was looking back and started panicking and telling dad to stop. Dad asked why. He said "your back wheel is about 2' in the air". Dad told him to hold on and don't jump off. It'll be fine. He never rode again after that round lol!

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17 hours ago, twostepn2001 said:

   I found this several months ago, not sure if you'd call it a ad, l think more like a press release but anyway......a JD CP20 1 row cotton picker.

 

JD CP20 cotton picker.JPG

"emerging markets", "hand picking".  It clearly is aimed at India, China etc.  #1 selling tractor is the world is Manhindra (POS) and #1 size is 23-30hp IIRC

Neat little unit though.  

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7 hours ago, dale560 said:

Dad actually bought a used cab for his but we never put it on. After he got rid of the versatile , he advertised it and about 5 months later a guy drove up 600 miles from around Rochester Mn and bought it. We now use pull type swathers when we rarely swath and dad has a 4000 IHC self propelled.

Ya we went to a hydroswing and use a 1066 with air conditioning to pull it. 

It's like you died and went to heaven. 

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We had a pair of 400s along with a IH 4000.  My opinion of them is they were cheap, light, under designed, and maybe ok as long as you packed welder with you.  The IH was twice the swather the 400s ever thought of being.  Also, twin swathing or putting two windrows was popular around here for a time.  In order to make room next to the 1st windrow for the end of he header Versatile just put a small shield inside the header so the 2nd windrow would just fall a foot from the other windrow.  That wasn't very much room and you really had to pay attention in order not to "hook" the 1st windrow.  JD on the other hand used a small separate canvas on the right side of the header to drop the 1st windrow 2ft inside the end of the header made lots of room for the 2nd windrow.  Versatile swathers were popular around here too but started falling out of favor in the 80s.  Their refusal to update their lineup to modern standards and come out with a deticated hay swather was their downfall.  The 4400 still was more or less a 400 with a nice cab and 4 wheels.  Still no diesel option.  Far as I know no 25ft header either.  The JD 2360 and 2280 along with Macdon really killed Versatile around here.

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46 minutes ago, Big Bud guy said:

We had a pair of 400s along with a IH 4000.  My opinion of them is they were cheap, light, under designed,   The JD 2360 and 2280 along with Macdon really killed Versatile around here.

Lots of 4400 Versatiles sold here too. I have the double swath table on the 2360 JD and far as I'm concerned that little canvas at the end is too much space between swaths. The few times I've used it I've had problems fitting 2 swaths onto the combine pickup on a curve. Ok on straight runs maybe in the open country but here we don't drive in a straight line for long and once I start turning with the JD pull type combine I will have swath pushin on each end of the pickup. And it has a wide pickup. So I don't use the double swath unless I have a poor, short or thin crop to swath. And then I'd likely straight cut it. 

Another popular machine here was the JD 800. I don't know that they were all that superior to Versatile but the 4 wheel design came out before Versatile or any other companies offered it. Smoothed out the ride some. They also had steering wheel drive while some others still used "tiller bars". They were not a hydrostatic drive either. This ad from about 1971 I think. 

 

 

 

800 Swather right.jpg

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5 minutes ago, dale560 said:

The 4400 had the Waukesha or rebranded vrd 220 or a very few did. You will see a few 4700 but the McDon and now CIH and JD , Massey all have good windrowers have made the versatile into scrap.

Waukesha? I would have bet money the 4400 still had the Ford engine. Wonder if my 4400 brochure will show. I'll dig it up later today just out of curiousity. I've been wrong before. 

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8 minutes ago, Loadstar said:

Waukesha? I would have bet money the 4400 still had the Ford engine. Wonder if my 4400 brochure will show. I'll dig it up later today just out of curiousity. I've been wrong before. 

Just a few did as the diesel option they ran the ford gas mainly

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On ‎3‎/‎7‎/‎2017 at 3:57 AM, twostepn2001 said:

   I found this several months ago, not sure if you'd call it a ad, l think more like a press release but anyway......a JD CP20 1 row cotton picker.

 

JD CP20 cotton picker.JPG

     In USA, I would think only market for this would be" research farms"  to keep track of  small plots  yields etc.

        Can't in any situation see a farmer buying that , when ,you can buy used multi row machines all day long.

       imho

      Tony

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You are right about the crooked fields vs straight fields.  We don't have to deal too many pot holes and most fields in our area and MT are farmed straight.  We only have to deal with the corners.  However I have watched your videos and it looks like your header is a 212 on the 7721.  Our headers we used was the 214 and later 914 two feet wider.   Maybe JD didn't offer the 214 on the 7721.  So going around corners with two windrows wasn't a problem for us.  It still got tight but was doable.  

The 800 was a planetary drive swather and replaced the 780.  The 400 was more advanced with the hydro drive but the 800 still had the enclosed sickle drive unlike the Versatile.  The 800 was popular here too but only because it was JDs cheapest economy swather.

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1 hour ago, dale560 said:

Just a few did as the diesel option they ran the ford gas mainly

Only ones I saw were gas and that's what my brochure shows too.  But I'm not surprised a diesel was offered probably special ordered.  There were a few of the 4700s around.  All they did was get Versatile to were most of the competition was a decade earlier.

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3 hours ago, Big Bud guy said:

Only ones I saw were gas and that's what my brochure shows too.  But I'm not surprised a diesel was offered probably special ordered.  There were a few of the 4700s around.  All they did was get Versatile to were most of the competition was a decade earlier.

Yea it was the same engine that was in the 160 bidi you see just a few of them. Versatile had what amounted to their own engine they called it a vrd 220

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