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Vintage Ads


clay neubauer

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19 hours ago, Delta Dirt said:

Lot of discussion on the Massey Ferguson combines on the forum recently.  I just came by this cut-a-way view while working on something else out of my picture file.  (don't know if this is something I scanned----------or may have copied from the forum sometime earlier)---------------anyway, it's colorful.

M-F combine cut a way.jpg

 

Just remember-------------M-F did not always stand for Massey Ferguson!!!!!:ph34r::P   

Don't know about you boys up Nawth-----------but M-F is a popular word in our vocabulary down South-------------especially when you are working on a combine with the dust and chaff falling down your shirt collar.

 

DD

M-F also stands for MacLean - Fogg a manufacturer of shouldered cap screws ( like the ones on the hood of Farmall 706 and later tractors)  Massey used them and I thought the M-F stamped on the heads was for Massey Ferguson. However, one day about 10 years ago I learned the truth about what the M-F stood for.

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On 1/14/2017 at 5:35 AM, George 2 said:

M-F also stands for MacLean - Fogg a manufacturer of shouldered cap screws ( like the ones on the hood of Farmall 706 and later tractors)  Massey used them and I thought the M-F stamped on the heads was for Massey Ferguson. However, one day about 10 years ago I learned the truth about what the M-F stood for.

Very interesting. I guess we might find MF fasteners on IH and JD combines as well?

I see as of tomorrow this vintage ad thread has been running 5 years which does not seem that long ago. 

So to mark that day here is a fairly memorable ad folder I happened to pick up from JD dealer some years ago. Hardly vintage even though it might be over 25 years old. 

 

JD vs Magnum.jpg

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32 minutes ago, Loadstar said:

Very interesting. I guess we might find MF fasteners on IH and JD combines as well?

I see as of tomorrow this vintage ad thread has been running 5 years which does not seem that long ago. 

So to mark that day here is a fairly memorable ad folder I happened to pick up from JD dealer some years ago. Hardly vintage even though it might be over 25 years old. 

 

Wow.  Never saw that one.  CIH did the same thing after the JD 8000 series came out.  They took it a step further by parading around a Magnum and a JD 8000 series.  Rember seeing the truck with both tractors at the port.  

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On 1/27/2012 at 3:31 PM, DOCTOR EVIL said:

I think it was around 1965 Dad had his '51 M engine rebuilt with 4" M&W Add-Power sleeves & pistons, bearings, gaskets, and all eight new valves. Think the bill came to almost $350 including the labor.

According to the inflation calculator, $350 in 1965 = $2706 now.

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On 1/17/2017 at 10:05 PM, Big Bud guy said:

Wow.  Never saw that one.  CIH did the same thing after the JD 8000 series came out.  They took it a step further by parading around a Magnum and a JD 8000 series.  Rember seeing the truck with both tractors at the port.  

I thought it was unique. I think that was the only picture but will have to review it to see if there is any more to scan. I had one from Case too and it was on how to sell the smaller (David Brown) sized Cases against John Deere. 

And now something quite different. An early rock picker ad. A name I had never heard of. Built in Minnesota and advertised here in the 1950 Country Guide. That name "Minn-Kota" sounds kind of familiar but I might be confusing it with Minn-toba tractor cabs too. 

Jochim Picker.jpg

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I think it was over on the vintage pictures thread we were discussing Massey combines and their sometimes troublesome rethresher system. I remembered there was a modification built here in Sask. to eliminate the re thresher and carry the returns up front to go through the main cylinder again. This brochure does not give too many details and I did a poor job of scanning apparently. But it appears to be an auger attached to carry the returns up to the front of the feeder and drop them via a rubber flex hose and cross auger into the feeder house. I think this was from about 1980. 

Kruger return system.jpg

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13 hours ago, dale560 said:

Versatile combines used augers instead of elevator chains for returns and clean grain. I suppose it was they were in the auger business anyway. They must have run those augers on the Massey with hydraulics.

Hi:  We put one of those augers on a 760.  It used a 90 degree gear box at the bottom end driven from the returns cross auger.  You could see the amount of returns while on the seat in the cab. CardaleBob.

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1 hour ago, CardaleBob said:

Hi:  We put one of those augers on a 760.  It used a 90 degree gear box at the bottom end driven from the returns cross auger.  You could see the amount of returns while on the seat in the cab. CardaleBob.

Bob, thanks for that info on the Massey return mod. I had never actually heard from anyone that tried it or how well they worked. I wondered about the drive too but the 90 degree gearbox makes sense. I didn't know if a hydraulic drive would handle an auger in tough crops with a lot of return flow. 

Here is another view of those Massey combines featuring the very popular Melroe pickup with rubber belts. Hydraulic drive too. Appears to be picking up flax swaths. How on earth did they put flax through that paddle feeder system without wrapping straw on every paddle?

MF Melroe pickup.jpg

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4 hours ago, Loadstar said:

Bob, thanks for that info on the Massey return mod. I had never actually heard from anyone that tried it or how well they worked. I wondered about the drive too but the 90 degree gearbox makes sense. I didn't know if a hydraulic drive would handle an auger in tough crops with a lot of return flow. 

Here is another view of those Massey combines featuring the very popular Melroe pickup with rubber belts. Hydraulic drive too. Appears to be picking up flax swaths. How on earth did they put flax through that paddle feeder system without wrapping straw on every paddle?

The combine might have a regular feederhouse chain.  The paddle idea was stupid in my opinion. 

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Neighbor used to go south and combine with masseys. Think they started with 510 and ran 850s up until the mid 90s .he combined all types of crops and I know he ran paddles. Traded the 850s for used 1688s and has ran ihs since. He did lots of acres maybe 10,000 or more a year with 2 then later 3 combines. I think the last ones he had were actually new in 1987 but had sat a while maybe made a few years earlier.

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In 1979 I worked on a farm in Manitoba on an exchange program. They had a brand new MF 750 and an older 760 combines and I recall the problems we had with crops wrapping on the paddle feeder system.

You can see in 2 of the photos the inspection/access hatch is open so that the operator can check to see if wrapping has started. We found that we had to stop as soon as we saw it starting to wrap and cut it off the paddle.

The combines are working in Birdsfoot Trefoil and it is combined at about the same stage as it would be baled for hay so it is still green and was prone to wrap.

MF had a kit that was designed to reduce wrapping and we fitted a kit to the 750. It consisted of sheet metal bolted onto the shaft/paddles to increase the "diameter" of the shaft and thus reduce wrapping. We lost a fair bit of knuckle skin but it did improve the performance but the trefoil and flax still wrapped regularly.

Canada 0177.JPG

Canada 0157.JPG

Canada 0158.JPG

Canada 0174.JPG

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5 hours ago, Big Bud guy said:

The combine might have a regular feederhouse chain.  The paddle idea was stupid in my opinion. 

My MF brochures show only the paddle feed. No mention of a feeder chain option. The smaller 550 and 540 had chains. 

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46 minutes ago, A554 said:

In 1979 I worked on a farm in Manitoba on an exchange program. They had a brand new MF 750 and an older 760 combines and I recall the problems we had with crops wrapping on the paddle feeder system.

You can see in 2 of the photos the inspection/access hatch is open so that the operator can check to see if wrapping has started. We found that we had to stop as soon as we saw it starting to wrap and cut it off the paddle.

The combines are working in Birdsfoot Trefoil and it is combined at about the same stage as it would be baled for hay so it is still green and was prone to wrap.

MF had a kit that was designed to reduce wrapping and we fitted a kit to the 750. It consisted of sheet metal bolted onto the shaft/paddles to increase the "diameter" of the shaft and thus reduce wrapping. We lost a fair bit of knuckle skin but it did improve the performance but the trefoil and flax still wrapped regularly.

 

 

 

 

That sounds all too similar to combining flax. Soon as a wrap starts better stop and wait to see if it will clear or else get out and start cutting with a saw. Good to hear from you and the memories of working the Masseys. I have no experience with that paddle feeder system as my 510 and 550 were all feeder chains. 

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My family had the 750, several 760, and an 850.  All with paddles I believe.  I don't recall any complaints.  Corn and soybeans were the crops.  The 750 did not stay around long as the Chevy V8 did not have enough power to unload corn on the go.

Ron

 

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I had an 1977+/- model M-F 750 with the paddles in the feeder housing-----------then a second 750 (purchased 1980+/-) with the feeder chain as a special option.

To tell you the truth------------it was about 6 is 1;  half a dozen the other.  True the paddles would tend to wrap in green morning glories (vines, etc.);------------but the chain in the big 50" feeder housing was heavy and tended to cause alot of vibration that was never felt in the paddle machine.  I do remember having the chain out of the feeder housing once or twice for repairs.

Seems like we added a second set of paddles to each shaft that helped with the wrapping situation (four paddles per shaft)???  (anyway--------did something that helped greatly).

Glad I now have certified medical records saying that I have had two strokes-----------------and can't remember all of those days!!!:o:blink:

 

DD

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15 hours ago, Delta Dirt said:

I had an 1977+/- model M-F 750 with the paddles in the feeder housing-----------then a second 750 (purchased 1980+/-) with the feeder chain as a special option.

To tell you the truth------------it was about 6 is 1;  half a dozen the other.  True the paddles would tend to wrap in green morning glories (vines, etc.);------------but the chain in the big 50" feeder housing was heavy and tended to cause alot of vibration that was never felt in the paddle machine.  I do remember having the chain out of the feeder housing once or twice for repairs.

Seems like we added a second set of paddles to each shaft that helped with the wrapping situation (four paddles per shaft)???  (anyway--------did something that helped greatly).!:o:blink:

 

DD

Interesting to hear you had the feeder chain on the 750. I have not found any brochures yet that mention it. 

Here is a page showing the 550 and 540. I did not even know MF offered a 540 as they were never seen around here. Too small for most people. By that time even the 550 was considered a small combine. I think this was from a late seventies brochure. 

 

scan0183.jpg

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them old massey threshed a pile of grain in this neck of the woods almost every second farm had one and the other half was the IH,

 

Neighbour had a 760 burn down he figured a bearing went up inside and got a little hot and there was nothing he could do it went up in smoke fast and replaced it with a 1480 pretty much all the massey combines I've seen out there has over 3500 hrs on it

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Still run our 850 every fall. It runs pretty faithfully too. Used to do 100-130 acres a day with it. Never managed a complete quarter though.  We've had it since 94. Had 800 hours on I think when we got it.  I can't really say a lot of bad things about it.  In heavy crops it doesn't put as much grain in the hopper as the 2188 but I think that can be said about any conventional combine.  It will combine flax beautifully when its fit. When it isn't though it wraps o everything.  One bad thing on it is the straw chopper. It doesn't cut very fine or spread very far.  It is a pain to work on too. Always something else you have to take off to get at the part you want to fix. Guess I can say a few things I don't like but overall through the years its been a good old combine for us.  Worst job by far I had to do on it was change the concaves. There's a hex shaft in there that is a real pita to get out. 

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On 1/24/2017 at 5:53 PM, poor farmer/logger said:

Still run our 850 every fall. It runs pretty faithfully too.  Guess I can say a few things I don't like but overall through the years its been a good old combine for us.

They were sure popular around here in their day too. More so than IH ever was. I don't know of many still in the field at harvest time though. They'd be getting pretty old by now. 

Here is another harvest themed ad. Old binder and maybe a Fordson? tractor. The name Johnie Walker might be familiar to some. That binder is really kicking out the sheaves. 

 

Johnnie Walker binder.jpg

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Here is an ad for an oil brand I have not heard of in a long time. I recall  buying Veedol snowmobile oil for my first snowmobile way back in 1975. This ad from 1949 features a Massey Harris 44. One of the more popular tractors here (in wide front  version of course). 

 

49 Veedol Massey.jpg

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  • 2 weeks later...

From my 1952 Kern Farm Equipment catalogue. Here are a couple of the many interesting accessories that they sold for the farm.  My dad bought one of the Joy Rider seats for his John Deere D.

52 Kern joy rider.jpg

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