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clay neubauer

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Ralph:

The reason there were and still are a lot of rock pickers in my area is that it is prime white bean and soybean land. However, it has a lot of glacial till in the soil  in a strip parallel to Lake Huron for about 50 miles stretching from Hwy 9 in the north to Hwy 83 in the south. That strip extends from about 10 miles inland to about 30 miles inland. So rock pickers are a must and especially in the early days when white beans were pulled with a bean puller. From what I saw, I think the old Anderson was about the first in the area back in the late 1950s to about 1970. The early ones were ground driven. The Crown and other copies of it made their debut in about 1970 with JF Farm Machinery of Exeter selling a lot of them. The early Crowns were ground drive also and the later ones in the late 1970's to 1980's were hydraulic drive. One of my neighbors has a Crown ground drive and I used it many years ago before I bought my own hydraulic drive version. What an improvement with hydraulic drive. Before I bought mine I looked at a bunch of old PTO drive Anderson's that were priced at scrap value. From what I knew about problems with broken PTO shafts, it didn't surprise me.  

As far as your pictures go, the picture of the WD9 brings back memories of about 50 years ago when I first visited this area. I was from small dairy country and I was amazed at the numbers of big old standards that were around in this area. There was even a W9 parked in a driveway on the main street in the town I first lived in in 1974. The locals told me they were old custom thresher tractors and some were brought in from Saskatchewan. There are some connections to Saskatchewan implement dealers to this very day in this area. That is why you see old prairie tractors with no 3 point at both Bryans Farm Supply in Puslinch and Teeswater Agro Parts in Teeswater, Ontario. Very few were ordered that way here originally. The reason was that McKee snowblowers and others were starting to be used and they were all rear mounted. Then International came out with their own model 80 snowblower and they sold a lot of them. Other small welding shops all started to make them in the late 1960's and they all needed 3 point hitch.       

 

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On 1/2/2017 at 7:03 PM, George 2 said:

Ralph:

That is why you see old prairie tractors with no 3 point at both Bryans Farm Supply in Puslinch and Teeswater Agro Parts in Teeswater, Ontario. Very few were ordered that way here originally. The reason was that McKee snowblowers and others were starting to be used and they were all rear mounted. Then International came out with their own model 80 snowblower and they sold a lot of them. Other small welding shops all started to make them in the late 1960's and they all needed 3 point hitch.       

 

40 some years ago when we were looking for a cheap snow blower there were only 3 point hitch models in that price range. It was pretty hard to find a tractor with 3 point hitch here back then. About all we saw were the little Ford N series and the bigger Fordson Majors. Ended up making a three point hitch for the Cockshutt 40 using parts from a wrecked Fordson Major. 

 

52 Fordson Major.jpg

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The subject of Sund pickups came up over on the vintage photos thread so i thought I'd post this circa 1980 vintage ad for Sund pickups. The cover shows two Sund pickups installed on a wide straight cut header and they appear to be picking up some type of row crop. Seems to me I heard of guys trying this with peas but I can't see it working too well if it pulls the whole plant out, muddy roots and all. 

 

Sund 600 pickup.jpg

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Ralph that was a big way to combine edible beans or lentils. On pinto beans they ran a knifer that had a spinning rod like a rod weeder to cut the plants of then the later ones actually wind rowed 20ft so up and down the field you picked up 40 ft that laid side to side. Big money in edibles the last few years. I thinkin that picture they actually ran knife Ike shovels shallow in the ground then gently laid two 30 inch rows together.

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17 minutes ago, Loadstar said:

The subject of Sund pickups came up over on the vintage photos thread so i thought I'd post this circa 1980 vintage ad for Sund pickups. The cover shows two Sund pickups installed on a wide straight cut header and they appear to be picking up some type of row crop. Seems to me I heard of guys trying this with peas but I can't see it working too well if it pulls the whole plant out, muddy roots and all. 

I have seen Sund advertise that too going straight into a pea crop.  We tried that one time on some specialty peas and I think it would have worked but we didn't have a cutting disc on each end of the header to cut a swath.  The problem was when the tines grabbed the peas the whole field wanted to come into the header and it would jam the header. 

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15 hours ago, Loadstar said:

The subject of Sund pickups came up over on the vintage photos thread so i thought I'd post this circa 1980 vintage ad for Sund pickups. The cover shows two Sund pickups installed on a wide straight cut header and they appear to be picking up some type of row crop. Seems to me I heard of guys trying this with peas but I can't see it working too well if it pulls the whole plant out, muddy roots and all. 

 

Sund 600 pickup.jpg

I think you might add "pulls the whole plant out, muddy roots, stones and all". That is how white beans were harvested here 35 to 40 years ago. Hence the need for a good stone picker.

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7 hours ago, dale560 said:

You ever notice those farmhands had the controls on the left side and most other loaders or tractor had right hand controls. I actually liked the left hand controls, all types of farmhand were popular here.

I actually know nothing about the Farmhand loader and had not noticed the location of the controls. The old Twin Draulic I bought years ago had controls on the right fender of the tractor. 

Now here is a different brand of loader that I have never heard of either. This Johnson Hydraulic Equipment Co. "Workhorse" looks similar design to the Farmhands. Apparently they were built in Minnesota. This ad from 1953. Some might recognize this ad as a re-run but I thought it fit well with the Farmhand loader theme I've got going. 

53 Workhorse loader small.jpg

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Ralph, I've spent lots and lots of hours operating and building Farmhand units. The first model they came out with was nicknamed the "bridge" model, due to all of the upper structure to hold the hydraulic arms and the head still and square. This one is shown on a John Deere, but when I was about four, Dad and his brothers bought one of these and mounted it on our Farmall H, Annie.

John Deere tractor with Farmhand Bridge Style hay stacker.jpg

Annie, our 1939 Farmall H, that they mounted the "bridge" Farmhand on. It was a mistake. My cousin Bob was operating it in the field haying. A buckrake brought him hay, so he started lifting and turning a "U" to head into the haystack. He laid the outfit over on its side. Did I mention, Annie is an IH Tractor on a Montana Farm?

IH Farmall H Annie, & 1925 Model TT outside 5-4-16.jpg

After that Dad started building them on trucks, reversed. This is the last of about 15 units Dad built. I helped with this one. He usually built them in the winter in his shop. This poor photo is from my auction sale bill.

F-10 Farmhand on KB-5 IH Truck-.jpg

I happen to have this one with it in the winter, and the grapple fork mounted. I used it to feed loose hay with. At this particular time, I had a sick cow and was using it to help hold her up. Our son Mike, standing there, is now 50+ years old.

Farmhand, TD-40, Mike age 4-.jpg

Speaking of a grapple fork, this pencil drawing my friend Don Greytak drew, shows how a tractor and grapple fork worked with one of those F-10 Farmhand loaders. They were a good loader and they were a great stacker. Gary;)

Greytak Farmall H & F-10 Farmhand-.jpg

 

Farmhand, TD-40, Mike age 4-.jpg

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46 minutes ago, dale560 said:

When guys ran farmhands on Hs they would break the clutch housing in half. Lots of people got good changing them out in the field. Don Greytak had a drawing of your truck and farmhand in the other thread dumping into the elevator or a close copy of it.OBG

 

Dale, I had a hired man break another borrowed (from a cousin) Farmall H in half, but it had a F-11 loader on it, not a F-10. I've never seen one break in half with a F-10, but there are lots I've never seen too. What is the "other thread", dale 560? I'm no computer geek.

This is my favorite Greytak drawing. It's one of, or his first where he did the whole background, like in a photo. It's over our dining room table.

Greytak Pencil drawing WD-9 K-5 mine 1-17-2014 red.jpg

My other favorite is this one of the WD-9 with MacDonald cab, pulling two #5 IH rod weeders. Notice he doesn't do all of the background on the olders ones. Gary;)

WD-9 McCormick with rods & MacDonald.jpg

 

 

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7 hours ago, Old Binder Guy said:

Dale, I had a hired man break another borrowed (from a cousin) Farmall H in half, but it had a F-11 loader on it, not a F-10. I've never seen one break in half with a F-10, but there are lots I've never seen too. What is the "other thread", dale 560? I'm no computer geek.

This is my favorite Greytak drawing. It's one of, or his first where he did the whole background, like in a photo. It's over our dining room table.

Greytak Pencil drawing WD-9 K-5 mine 1-17-2014 red.jpg

My other favorite is this one of the WD-9 with MacDonald cab, pulling two #5 IH rod weeders. Notice he doesn't do all of the background on the olders ones. Gary;)

WD-9 McCormick with rods & MacDonald.jpg

 

 

The vintage picture thread you have a picture of the farmhand lifting the truck. I swear the same picture was a Greytak drawing did he use your farm for a few of his pictures? They used to have an art store in the mall and always loved to look over his drawings. Dad had an A jd and farmhand to lift the trucks

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40 minutes ago, Fred B said:

musta been the hired hand running that wd9, he's "in the fence", surely the owner wouldn't do that.    :rolleyes:

Fred B, You will never know how haunting that picture is to me. When I first saw the drawing at Whitefish, Montana about 30 years ago, it was across the street in the school yard from where we lived. They were having an "Art in the Park" event and Don Greytak brought his wares. When I was "a kid" Dad bought the 1952 WD-9 pictured below at Emil Schubert's farm auction. He had a chance to buy the MacDonald cab elsewhere, and it is escaping me as to where Dad bought it. But he wanted to appear "an up to date farmer" with a rubber tire tractor and cab, in spite of doing much of his farm work with TD-40 TracTracTors. The WD-9 wasn't useful for much, it seemed to me? But Dad had a pair of McCormick-Deering #5 Rod Weeders. They would be a nice load for a WD-9, cutting 24' of width farming. I would have been about 11 years old at that time. I was kind of a big kid. This picture shows me at the left on the steam engine at age 11.

Me Gary & Mike Tyler on 20-70 Nichols & Shepard 1955 Bill and Joe Yaeger.jpg

That summer, Dad (right above) would send me to the field with his WD-9 & MacDonald cab with his pair of #5 rod weeders, paired together in a squadron hitch (as shown in Greytak's picture). Our "strips" were 1-1/4 miles long. On the south end of the strips, where you'd make two corners and head back was neighbor, Roger Long's and Dad's fence. Dad turned me loose in his WD-9 and off I went. I had to be careful all the way down (and all the way back) as there were strips of winter wheat at the rod weeder's outer edge. When I'd gotten to the end, I started my turn, trying to avoid that fence between us and the neighbor. I remember using the left wheel brake to assist in that turn, but dang it, I got the outer end of that rod weeder into the barbed wire. I know I broke a couple of fence posts and I had to untangle a chunk of broken, wrapped barbed wire from around the outer sprocket. It took me about an hour to repair my damage, and you CAN'T back up those rod weeders, you have to go forward. At the age of that young man in that Greytak picture, was about the age I was when I saw the picture at Art in the Park. I remember gasping, as I actually thought that was me in the picture. It looks exactly like I looked at that time.

If I was the "hired man," I wasn't on the payroll, but I still benefitted from being my dad's son. That picture (above our dining table) is just a deeply etched family story. Now, I've told it to you too! (And, I'm sure Dad wouldn't have hit the fence like I did?) This is a picture I have of Dad's WD-9 and MacDonald cab. 

WD-9, 150 shovel drill, Tish sharp.jpg

And this is an ad for them, in keeping in line with Ralph's thread! Gary;)

MacDonald cab on WD-9 1954 Ralph ad red.jpg

PS: Fred B... I'm not so old or naive I didn't catch your "tongue in cheek" remark!

 

 

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14 hours ago, Old Binder Guy said:

Dale560,
I don't recall a picture of mine showing a Farmhand lifting a truck? 

Gary:(

Sorry it was big bud guy on the vintage pictures thread. I know there was a drawing of that exact picture of his. Used to be fun go to Minot go to the mall and look at dons drawings or art.

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So last night I ran by the parents house on my way home and my Mother surprised me with a few "things" she had found.  My Great Grandparents bought an IH deep freeze new in 1955.  It is still running in the basement and has been without trouble.  Mom handed me a stack and said "I think you will like this".  It was all the original paperwork that came with the freezer.  

1194E9B6-4E15-46A7-BDD1-6A41E68588B8_zps

The other manuals are in partial color.  I don't collect literature unless it is something with family history or that I own so I have no idea how rare any of these are.  

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3 hours ago, Old Binder Guy said:

Fred B, You will never know how haunting that picture is to me. When I first saw the drawing at Whitefish, Montana about 30 years ago, it was across the street in the school yard from where we lived. They were having an "Art in the Park" event and Don Greytak brought his wares. When I was "a kid" Dad bought the 1952 WD-9 pictured below at Emil Schubert's farm auction. He had a chance to buy the MacDonald cab elsewhere, and it is escaping me as to where Dad bought it. But he wanted to appear "an up to date farmer" with a rubber tire tractor and cab, in spite of doing much of his farm work with TD-40 TracTracTors. The WD-9 wasn't useful for much, it seemed to me? But Dad had a pair of McCormick-Deering #5 Rod Weeders. They would be a nice load for a WD-9, cutting 24' of width farming. I would have been about 11 years old at that time. I was kind of a big kid. This picture shows me at the left on the steam engine at age 11.

Me Gary & Mike Tyler on 20-70 Nichols & Shepard 1955 Bill and Joe Yaeger.jpg

That summer, Dad (right above) would send me to the field with his WD-9 & MacDonald cab with his pair of #5 rod weeders, paired together in a squadron hitch (as shown in Greytak's picture). Our "strips" were 1-1/4 miles long. On the south end of the strips, where you'd make two corners and head back was neighbor, Roger Long's and Dad's fence. Dad turned me loose in his WD-9 and off I went. I had to be careful all the way down (and all the way back) as there were strips of winter wheat at the rod weeder's outer edge. When I'd gotten to the end, I started my turn, trying to avoid that fence between us and the neighbor. I remember using the left wheel brake to assist in that turn, but dang it, I got the outer end of that rod weeder into the barbed wire. I know I broke a couple of fence posts and I had to untangle a chunk of broken, wrapped barbed wire from around the outer sprocket. It took me about an hour to repair my damage, and you CAN'T back up those rod weeders, you have to go forward. At the age of that young man in that Greytak picture, was about the age I was when I saw the picture at Art in the Park. I remember gasping, as I actually thought that was me in the picture. It looks exactly like I looked at that time.

If I was the "hired man," I wasn't on the payroll, but I still benefitted from being my dad's son. That picture (above our dining table) is just a deeply etched family story. Now, I've told it to you too! (And, I'm sure Dad wouldn't have hit the fence like I did?) This is a picture I have of Dad's WD-9 and MacDonald cab. 

WD-9, 150 shovel drill, Tish sharp.jpg

And this is an ad for them, in keeping in line with Ralph's thread! Gary;)

MacDonald cab on WD-9 1954 Ralph ad red.jpg

PS: Fred B... I'm not so old or naive I didn't catch your "tongue in cheek" remark!

 

 

Something I found interesting. The Macdonalds who ran Macdonald Bros Aircraft limited in Winnipeg are NOT related to the Macdonalds who build the draper grain heads under the Mac Don name and also in Winnipeg. Just a useless bit of information. 

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39 minutes ago, George 2 said:

Something I found interesting. The Macdonalds who ran Macdonald Bros Aircraft limited in Winnipeg are NOT related to the Macdonalds who build the draper grain heads under the Mac Don name and also in Winnipeg. Just a useless bit of information. 

Funny but I would have been willing to bet that the Macdonalds who sold tractor cabs went on to become Macdon Industries. But I guess I would have been wrong. In fact Macdon grew out of what was originally Killberry Industries and was one of the earliest names in self propelled swathers in Canada. I can remember seeing a few Killberry swathers many years ago. A little newer than this 1953 model. 

53 Kilberry.jpg

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57 minutes ago, Loadstar said:

Funny but I would have been willing to bet that the Macdonalds who sold tractor cabs went on to become Macdon Industries. But I guess I would have been wrong. In fact Macdon grew out of what was originally Killberry Industries and was one of the earliest names in self propelled swathers in Canada. I can remember seeing a few Killberry swathers many years ago. A little newer than this 1953 model. 

53 Kilberry.jpg

The Macdonald who bought out the Kilberry's was originally from Nova Scotia and he had been a Vice President at Cockshutt Farm Equipment before moving to Winnipeg. There is a Mac Don advertising flyer that has this info on it. I got a copy last fall. 

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On 1/12/2017 at 3:28 PM, George 2 said:

The Macdonald who bought out the Kilberry's was originally from Nova Scotia and he had been a Vice President at Cockshutt Farm Equipment before moving to Winnipeg. There is a Mac Don advertising flyer that has this info on it. I got a copy last fall. 

I have that same publication on the history of Macdon. Not the same ones who built tractor cabs. In fact Macdonald Bros. Industries of Manitoba were building floats for float planes prior to WWII. They branched out to maintenance and repair on aircraft used in the Commonwealth Air Training Plan. As well they manufactured wings for Anson bombers. Its an interesting story and can be read in a detailed pdf file at http://wartimecanada.ca/document/world-war-ii/company-newsletters/war-industries-manitoba

The tractor cabs they built after the war looked pretty good too. 

 

Macdonald tractor cab small.jpg

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Lot of discussion on the Massey Ferguson combines on the forum recently.  I just came by this cut-a-way view while working on something else out of my picture file.  (don't know if this is something I scanned----------or may have copied from the forum sometime earlier)---------------anyway, it's colorful.

M-F combine cut a way.jpg

 

Just remember-------------M-F did not always stand for Massey Ferguson!!!!!:ph34r::P   

Don't know about you boys up Nawth-----------but M-F is a popular word in our vocabulary down South-------------especially when you are working on a combine with the dust and chaff falling down your shirt collar.

 

DD

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