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clay neubauer

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On 2/28/2017 at 3:19 AM, twostepn2001 said:

Here's another ad for A-C strippers.

Allis Chalmers cotton stripper ad-75.jpg

Notice the paint?  The 1sr AC ad she's shiny, this one not so.  Wonder if its a "fake" ad?

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I still don't have any cotton pickers from J.I. Case but I think these grinder mixers must be just about as scarce. I have it in a mid sixties buyers guide. 

 

Case Grinder.jpg

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Maybe the wrong place for it, but tell an Iowa farm boy....what's the difference between a cotton picker and a cotton stripper?

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On ‎3‎/‎2‎/‎2017 at 9:31 PM, A554 said:

The 622 cotton picker was in the 1976 IH Australian buyers guide.

 

IH 622 cotton picker 1976.jpg

      There were hundreds of 622 's out here .

       Especially South Counties,  Boswell , Salyers  ,were huge cotton growers in 50's-60's-70's  When they lined them up in yard you could not count then . there were so many.

       Like so much of I.H. tractors , Guys would turn these things up and they were picking fools until the extra rpm's  caused lot of problems .

       Also all the controls were electric & solenoids and the had many fires. 

       I tried to steer clear of them because they were brutes but maintenance was paramount.

         The  699's & 9900 J.D.'s were fast also and more user friendly for us smaller guys. ( All these were hydrostatic drive . Gear drive was available but most of us were tired of fighting gears on the one rows & early two rows)

           In late 70's I went to Chandler Arizona to see about purchasing a one year old picker on rental . Drove onto a Indian reservation & the picking contractor had THREE Groups of 20 each running all 622's  AND GET THIS EVERY DRIVER WAS FEMALE. He said he had cut down on repairs nearly 50%  & dependability in drivers showing up had gone up.

       I vividly remember the picker I had wanted came to the end and gal driver whipped her around to the module builder Or Rick ,don't remember. she dumped and got out of cab wearing a tight pair of Wranglers ,Boots ,a can of skoal in back pocket, Cap with pony tail sticking out the back. It was in 1978 and I was 33 . Had one H+ll of time looking picker over.:wub:

     Not to be a smart as+ but the crop being picked in this picture looks to be second picking.  If that is first pick ,He had a carry over at bank and missed  making the picker payment that year.

       BTW I ended up with a J.D.:P

           Tony

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3 hours ago, dads706 said:

Maybe the wrong place for it, but tell an Iowa farm boy....what's the difference between a cotton picker and a cotton stripper?

Cotton stripper literally strips cotton, bolls , of the stem.  I believe used more so in dryland cotton or very sandy small growing plants.

    Cotton picker has rotating spindles that pull lint of the bracks of bolls and pretty much leaves everything else on plant.  Pickers are used on larger growing plants and higher producing land.

   With pickers there were High drum & low drum  there again for different growing types of plants.  High drum had more spindles on bars thus you see the old M's on picker with the axle drops .  Low drum picker was shorter height for shorter cotton . And on the one rows they just ran them on tractor height.

  Twostepin , knows much more of strippers . We never had any out here.   ( That is on wheels)  (Many around poles)

     Tony 

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Those case pics are interesting. Except that Case 500 stripper looks like a Hesston with Case decals. Maybe Hesston built some equipment for Case?   Tony's description between the difference of a picker and stripper is pretty much right. A picker used spindles and doffers to pick the cotton out of the bolls as where a stripper used bats and brushes to strip the cotton stalk of leaves, green bolls and open bolls with lint.

 I've seen one of these one row Dearborn's on a Texas A & M experiment farm near Lubbock, Texas. They used it to harvest small test plots of different cotton varieties.

 

Dearborn stripper.jpg

Dearborn stripper-1.jpg

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Following up on Tony and TwoStep's comments on differences between cotton picker and cotton strippers:

The pickers are much more complex in their mechanical design (therefore more expensive to purchase and operate)- - - - - resulting in far less trash in the harvested cotton than with a stripper that literally "stripped" the plant of most everything but the stalk.  

The stripper is a "once over harvest"- - - - where a picker leaves the green (unopen) bolls to mature;  which were picked later on a second picking (commonly referred to as "scrapping").

Gins processing stripper cotton required much more cleaning equipment than those ginning picker harvested cotton.  Typically- - - - the picker cotton resulted in higher grade; which resulted in a higher market price. 

Here in the Mississippi Delta area- - - - we have very humid weather patterns resulting in an open cotton crop to be vulnerable to heavy rains- - - - best to get as much picked as you can, when you can.  Where in the dry climate areas- - - - it was relatively safe to wait until all of the cotton bolls were open and do a "once over" harvest.

In reality- - - - - due to changes in cotton varieties and upgrading of defoliant products;- - - - - - very little cotton is picked more than once anymore here in the Delta due to the high operating costs of a cotton picker.  And- - - - the new strippers now have some built in cleaning action that takes place as the cotton passes toward the basket.

Will try to post a picture or so of the picker bars and spindles sometime soon.

DD

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illustrated pictures of spindles/doffers, etc. on a IH model M-12 one row cotton picker (mounted on a Farmall M):

 

front view:

58bca2c07f7f9_Mcottonpicker4a.jpg.b9f27b82286289c5dcb102f9a7049169.jpg

 

 

side view with door open (actually missing)

58bca2e903646_Mcottonpicker5a.jpg.a28ff8002e056d4d9d8e5e290fd9837b.jpg

 

This is from an early IH one row picker---------------the same principle is used on the modern day pickers;---------just picking 6 rows at a time with forward speed approximately 3 times as fast as the old machines.   And---------the old one rows would pick it off the stalk just as good as the new pickers.

 

 

Delta Dirt   (Avon  Ms  38723

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Here is the same model picker in the field----------picture taken in Coahoma County, Mississippi (circa 1948)

 

58bca5e1575da_Mcottonpicker_HBarnes.jpg.31e48bc40cbe3dd8ff7fdadea0909cca.jpg

 

(not exactly an advertisments Ralph-----------but maybe helpful in answering the question)------------just to make it an advertisment;  I will add:   "Buy Cotton---------wear jeans!!!!!"

 

DD

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Boy those things look more dangerous than a picker . .....

Thanks for sharing this with us

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Anson seems like I remember you posting that "diagram" of the picker before. Thanks! And like you say, whether it be a 1940's one row IH or a modern day 8 row JD picker, they are basically the same. On a side note, JD is the only remaining manufacturer of cotton strippers.Not positive but I think 1988 was the last year for IH.

Not really a ad, but just a pic of a new JD stripper.

 

JD 7460.jpg

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18 hours ago, Delta Dirt said:

Here is the same model picker in the field----------picture taken in Coahoma County, Mississippi (circa 1948)

 

 

 

(not exactly an advertisments Ralph-----------but maybe helpful in answering the question)------------just to make it an advertisment;  I will add:   "Buy Cotton---------wear jeans!!!!!"

 

DD

Its close enough to an ad for me. Blue jeans are almost a uniform requirement for me here on the farm. Underneath coveralls of course. The big name in blue jeans when I was a kid was GWG (Great Western Garment co.) as seen in this ad from 1958. 

 

Cowboy Kings for 58.jpg

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17 hours ago, bitty said:

Boy those things look more dangerous than a picker . .....

Thanks for sharing this with us

 They weren't to bad to handle . Had to remember front wheel was on back .lol

  As for picker I think worst accidents were running into cotton trailers.

  As for human accidents it was being in too big a hurry .  Many a farmer or driver got his leg caught in rotating spindles while servicing or during plug ups . The spindles would wrap around the pant legs  just like it did the lint.  I actually had a relative that caught his leg, out in a remote field  and thank God the spindle had wrap his pants and plugged hole on his leg from bleeding out before paramedics arrived. 

     Tony

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13 hours ago, twostepn2001 said:

   I found this several months ago, not sure if you'd call it a ad, l think more like a press release but anyway......a JD CP20 1 row cotton picker.

 

 

That is surprising to see they build something for the smaller operators. Here it seems there is nothing new for the small farmer. Its either big time farming with huge equipment or else lawn and acreage equipment. 

Back in 72 this was one of the most popular swathers (windrowers if you prefer) in Western Canada. Versatile built them in various header sizes but all with the same reliable and proven power unit. Simple hydro drive and dependable Ford 200 cubic inch six cylinder. They sure sold a lot of them here in Sask. 

 

72 Vers 400.jpg

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TwoStep- - -

Never have seen your small one row J- D;- - - - - seems highly unusual for modern times.

Am wondering if that small scale picker wasn't aimed at a foreign market or maybe test plot work???  Over this way- - - - - - seems that every segment of growing cotton has continuously gone toward larger scale/higher volume ever since we left hand picking.

Don't know if I picked too much or not enuff of it- - - - - - - but I got "poor enough to retire" from farming back in the mid 80's.:blush::wacko:

I see it states that the basket volume is stated in liters with manual dumped basket as standard - - - - - with optional hydraulic dump??

DD

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34 minutes ago, Loadstar said:

That is surprising to see they build something for the smaller operators. Here it seems there is nothing new for the small farmer. Its either big time farming with huge equipment or else lawn and acreage equipment. 

Back in 72 this was one of the most popular swathers (windrowers if you prefer) in Western Canada. Versatile built them in various header sizes but all with the same reliable and proven power unit. Simple hydro drive and dependable Ford 200 cubic inch six cylinder. They sure sold a lot of them here in Sask. 

 

72 Vers 400.jpg

I  know dad had 3 of those versatile swathers. He had an 18 ft like that and an 18 ft ih 175 he traded the 175 for a 20 ft 400. They ran the two for a few years then he bought a newer 400 with the straight exhaust pipe. They ran two 20 fts until the mid 80s than we just ran the later one. The later ones were the same looking but had a lot of different stuff on them. I can't stress enough how I hated running that 400.  With one we tried to get a 100 acres a day done sometimes not and some days you could cut a 160. The 160 days were 6:30 am to 10:00 pm with a five minute stop for gas and lunch. Did I stress how much I hated that 400 they were a good outfit but bugs and dust were your enemy. We even had a special built trailer to back it on with cradles for the wheels to transport it if you needed to go over 5 miles.

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49 minutes ago, Loadstar said:

That is surprising to see they build something for the smaller operators. Here it seems there is nothing new for the small farmer. Its either big time farming with huge equipment or else lawn and acreage equipment. 

Back in 72 this was one of the most popular swathers (windrowers if you prefer) in Western Canada. Versatile built them in various header sizes but all with the same reliable and proven power unit. Simple hydro drive and dependable Ford 200 cubic inch six cylinder. They sure sold a lot of them here in Sask. 

 

72 Vers 400.jpg

I spent thousands of hours on one of those. Good reliable machine but like any non cab swather, it was a hot, dusty, buggy miserable thing to run. 

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