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9 minutes ago, Old Binder Guy said:

Steve C. I must have been a "late bloomer" there? I did more smoking than my parents knew about as a kid, with Uncle Bill who lived with us and smoked Camels. I don't know how old I was before I ever saw a book match? We always had the wooden "farmer matches" in a tin dispenser in our back porch. I remember the unencumbered feeling of smoking on a Farmall, pulling a hay rake or mowing. I took a fingernail clipper and cut about three little notches in the side of my thumbnail, for striking stick matches one handed, on the move. Then one time, a fair sized chunk of that sulfur went underneath my thumbnail and burned a little brownish black hole. By the time my mother confronted me for smoking, because of tobacco in my shirt pockets at laundry time, it wasn't as much fun, but I continued smoking after that. I remember getting "city matches" then and likely learned that verse you quoted? Gary;)

Gary, that is just the ad I was thinking of. Now I won't have to search and scan the one that I have "somewhere". I remember my Uncle Don striking those "farmer matches" using one hand and his thumb nail. Looked pretty cool. Others would just swipe the head of the match down their pant leg quickly to get enough friction that it would ignite.

Yes, back in "the day" seems like most everybody smoked. I seem to recall my dad carrying a lighter most of the time to light up his W.D. and H.O hand rolled cigarettes. It was quite a procedure getting the paper out of the pack, pouring in the tobacco, rolling it up in the paper and licking the edge, like a stamp, so the paper would stick together. Pure unfiltered tobacco. I've still got a few of the packs around. I'd guess the tobacco is a little dry by now. :-)

 

 

Ronson table lighter.jpg

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Ralph,

I have many of your ads in my files. I always end each title with "ad Ralph," if I typed that in my documents inquiry, probably hundreds would come up in an instant. I used to roll my own for a while too. I started with uncle Audie's Bull Durham. Then decided there were better "stringy" tobaccos that held together better, when rolling. It was always interesting to be summer fallowing on the TD-18, and rolling and lighting them without stopping. I got pretty good at it too!  The old TD-18A was an IH Tractor on a Montana Farm too!

TD-18A, toolbar, rod weeders, no cab_edited-1.jpg

Mike has a lighter collection at Silver Creek. This is only a portion of them. I have one that isn't shown that was a Ronson butane lighter, and engraved very fancily, from an old, late friend who did that in Lewistown. He was so good at engraving, the FBI checked him out each year to make sure he wasn't "making printing plate$."

some of Mike's lighters red.jpg

A later addition to Mikes collection is this one I found in a junk store here in Helena. It is a Zippo!

Zippo cigarette lighter IH G. Granger_edited-1.jpg

And a couple more of Ralph's ads! Situations, politically correct people couldn't fathom today! Gary;)

Ronald Reagan sending friends Chesterfield Cigarettes for Christmas.jpg

Dale Robertson and his Chesterfield cigarettes on the airline.jpg

 

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On 9/8/2016 at 10:33 AM, Old Binder Guy said:

 

 

A later addition to Mikes collection is this one I found in a junk store here in Helena. It is a Zippo!

 

And a couple more of Ralph's ads! Situations, politically correct people couldn't fathom today! Gary;)

Gary, you have my ads organized better than I do. Nice lighter collection too. Especially the IH.  I know this one is a repeat but since we are into vintage tobacco ads I could not resist bringing back the Old Gold girl. 

Old Gold Cigarettes.jpg

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Uhhhh--------thanks for posting the Old Gold girl Loadstar.   There is something smoking in that advertisment-----I am not sure it is the cigarettes!!

The Professor (Old Binder Guy) brought up Bull Durham tobacco from his TD-18 days a few posts back.  Made me remember my old Durham tobacco ad that I picked up in an Arkansas re-sale shop several years ago.  It actually is a cardboard poster that someone apparently placed  in the rustic wooden frame (no glass). 

Durham Tobaco adv.jpg

 

I have no idea as to what date this would have been-------------but it sure fits the Mississippi Delta scene from back when I wuz a kid.  Seems like I have witnessed this scene many times in the past.   Note the 'possum and rabbits slung over the old man's shoulder------hammer **** double barrel shotguns and the two swapping a light off of the other's pipes.  Neither one of the older men seem to be paying any attention to the bull----------while little "Junior" and the dog iz fully aware of the danger lurking in the pasture.

Anyway------------this ad is for Durham tobacco.  Does anyone know what was the difference in Durham and Bull Durham, or when did Bull Durham come into play.

 

 

Delta Dirt  (Avon  Ms  38723)

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15 hours ago, Delta Dirt said:

Uhhhh--------thanks for posting the Old Gold girl Loadstar.   There is something smoking in that advertisment-----I am not sure it is the cigarettes!!

The Professor (Old Binder Guy) brought up Bull Durham tobacco from his TD-18 days a few posts back.  Made me remember my old Durham tobacco ad that I picked up in an Arkansas re-sale shop several years ago.  It actually is a cardboard poster that someone apparently placed  in the rustic wooden frame (no glass). 

Anyway------------this ad is for Durham tobacco.  Does anyone know what was the difference in Durham and Bull Durham, or when did Bull Durham come into play.

Delta Dirt  (Avon  Ms  38723)

Anson, that Durham ad is quite a work of art and I have never seen one like it. This Daily Mail I have is unique in that it is made of paper rather than tin due to wartime packaging as it says on the label. I have the tin version as well. Note the price , 65 cents. 

Daily Mail wartime.jpg

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Slow rain again so no harvesting for a day or so. I put in a little time on some vintage tillage yesterday. A little patch of ground I could not get to due to water at planting time so it is summerfallow. Sprayed it once early with Roundup, later on cultivated with spikes. This time I could not get there without distubing canola swaths unless I used something small. My uncle's old John Deere 16 foot surflex tiller, or as we called them, a disker, was nearby. I added a little air to one leaking tire, grease to the moving parts and disked the weeds down in short order. Much like the one in this ad from 1952. Although I was not driving a John Deere tractor like the R diesel in the ad. 

 

JD R Diskers.jpg

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  • 2 weeks later...

Well, I am slipping. Ten days since a new vintage appeared here. Been a little busy with harvest.  So speaking of harvest , here is a 1962 Gleaner model C combine ad. I've never had much to do with Gleaners so that feeder design is interesting. 

1962 Gleaner combines.jpg

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When I was really young dad had my grandpas f gleaner. It was a gas and I think my grandpa bought it new in 1968. I remember dad added a cab to it around 1975.  He traded it for an 815 diesel around 1978. He was farming around 2000 crop acres when he was running the f  gleaner but at least a 1/3 was summer fallow then but still a lot of ground to cover. All I remember night time didn't matter to much then when you were picking up swaths you ran as long as you could. There actually were a lot of gleaners down here up until the L series and a lot of Ns. He had the F gleaner and a 49 Chevy and 59 gmc truck even done a little custom harvesting if he got done early.

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On 9/22/2016 at 1:44 AM, dale560 said:

When I was really young dad had my grandpas f gleaner. It was a gas and I think my grandpa bought it new in 1968. I remember dad added a cab to it around 1975.  He traded it for an 815 diesel around 1978. He was farming around 2000 crop acres when he was running the f  gleaner but at least a 1/3 was summer fallow then but still a lot of ground to cover. All I remember night time didn't matter to much then when you were picking up swaths you ran as long as you could. There actually were a lot of gleaners down here up until the L series and a lot of Ns. He had the F gleaner and a 49 Chevy and 59 gmc truck even done a little custom harvesting if he got done early.

The Gleaners had a fairly good reputation around here but I've had no experience with them. This ad from 1971 shows a nice Chevy fueling up a Gleaner combine. I've got almost the same truck except not a stepside.  

71 Chevs and Gleaner.jpg

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The reputation of the conventional Gleaners around here were hit and miss.  Some guys loved them and some guys hated them.  I only know of one guy around here running conventional Gleaners.  He runs three L2s.  A neighbor that bordered us on the north ran a CII Gleaner and a JD 7700 gasser up till they sold out in 1991.  My uncle worked for them for about 8 years.  His first job was to put the CII back together.  They were in the middle of overhauling it and my uncle could stand behind the back of the combine and see right through it.  Here is a scan from the early 60s of a CII with the option of a 24ft header.  Had to be the biggest header on the market.  I can't image this combine handling this size of header in anything but droughted out wheat.  It took a JD 7700 or MF 750/760 to push a 24ft header even in our 25 bpa wheat we averaged back then. 

gleanerc1-1.jpg

gleanerc2-2.jpg

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I had a A 2 with a 3 row corn head.  Shelled about 300 acres , the first year I had. Did it all with no filler bars on the cylinder. Replaced almost every bearing that fall. 1" shafts everywhere.  The direct cut header warped on me  because I didn't know it needed 2 angle iron stabilizer bars.  The thing was a nightmare!  Then it caught fire and like a dumbass ,I put the fire out. Had ins. but didn't total it.  Fixed it then sold it and bought a JD 105 diesel. That combine served me well. I dumped it when I hired my combining done.  Smart move. Over 40 years ago. I got an education

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The Cll must have been a bigger combine than the f right? I know 18 foot swaths were a load for the f and that was in 20 bpa wheat of years ago. Dad bought a second combine a versatile 5000 in about 75 it ran a 361 fordv8 but was about same capacity as the f gleaner. By then he had two load star 1600 to haul grain with the 49 and 59.

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11 hours ago, dale560 said:

The Cll must have been a bigger combine than the f right? I know 18 foot swaths were a load for the f and that was in 20 bpa wheat of years ago. Dad bought a second combine a versatile 5000 in about 75 it ran a 361 fordv8 but was about same capacity as the f gleaner. By then he had two load star 1600 to haul grain with the 49 and 59.

The CII was bigger but not by much.  Only a couple inches wider in the cylinder/separator and both combines had about the same hp.  I think the CII dimension wise was about between a F and a G.  I would love to see a CII today with a 24ft,

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If you look at the changes made from the 1480 combine through to the present 6140 combine it will give you some idea of what has happened with yields. Changes like much larger clean grain elevators (at least twice as big), sieves that are about a foot longer, AFX rotors with auger fronts, longer discharge augers, and engines with at least 50 percent more HP. Yet the separator width is the same. I know I found this out the hard way a few years ago with my 1660 in 200 bu corn. The bottom sieve is just not large enough so I had to open it up wide open. 

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Before this thread gets lost and forgotten, I do have another ad or two to post on this rainy Sunday morning. Need parts to keep your Massey combine in the field? Just let me check my 1947 catalogue. 

 

MH V belts.jpg

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I haven't posted a lot of Allis Chalmers ads but they had some nice art work on their Country Guide ads in the 1960s. Like this 190 XT ad from 1965.

65 AC 190 XT.jpg

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On 10/5/2016 at 7:59 PM, M Diesel said:

If these come out correct...

$273,528.46

$235,691.49

$189,714.79

Pretty similar to my inflation calculator for Cdn. dollar as well. 

264,390.23

227,396.87

183,199.20

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Here is the machine we need now to lift and shake the snow off our soaked swaths. Might need some modifications to handle those 36 foot swaths. :-)

From 1952. 

 

52 Westgo Swath Lifter small.jpg

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On ‎10‎/‎5‎/‎2016 at 7:53 PM, Loadstar said:

Interesting to see the prices of new IH four wheel drive tractors here in Sask. in 1981. 

81 IH 4 wheel drives.jpg

What was the exchange rate at that time? We bought a brand new Versatile 950 in 1979 and price was just over $60,000. 

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Always interesting to read about and see harvesting of the swathed grain.  Don't believe I have ever seen a swather nor combine picking up swaths in action.

And----then Ralph comes along with the "swath fluffer". Seems like the least bit of fluffing action in the swath would cause considerable shattering??

And-----we sure don't see snow in early October down here in Mississippi.  Hoping ya'll get a break in the weather so to finish up harvest soon.

 

DD

 

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23 hours ago, Delta Dirt said:

Always interesting to read about and see harvesting of the swathed grain.  Don't believe I have ever seen a swather nor combine picking up swaths in action.

And----then Ralph comes along with the "swath fluffer". Seems like the least bit of fluffing action in the swath would cause considerable shattering??

And-----we sure don't see snow in early October down here in Mississippi.  Hoping ya'll get a break in the weather so to finish up harvest soon.

 

DD

 

You are right Anson, you can't really do anything to canola swaths without them shelling out. It might be ok on cereal grains but there is considerable difference in swaths from 1952 to today's massive heavy swaths. In 52 if you had a 16 foot swath it was about as big as they got. Today's can be double that size. 

Here is another new IH combine from 1981. The 1482 pull type priced at just under $59,000 was a lot of combine capacity. Hitch your 1486 up and go. Although for today's muddy fields I might want a 2+2 or a real four wheel drive pulling. 

 

81 1482.jpg

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