Jump to content

Vintage Ads


clay neubauer

Recommended Posts

15 minutes ago, wheatking said:

ya that's true if we can find another survivor first lol

 

the W-9 is a big heavy machine I don't have one although i know where one is except it the typical story its worth lots and i might restore it some day. hopefully i can save it some time

When I think back on the 40 odd years of farm auctions I have attended I can think of a lot of cheap old iron that i should have brought home. And pretty sure some of that went for scrap iron too. In fact I knew of one guy who was cleaning up the scrap iron around his yard prior to his auction and he threw in a complete W6 tractor. 

52 9M and SW6.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

ya I know of 3 guys that have gone to auctions for 30 years and now they have everything everybody wants from tractors to old signs to everything

 

this spring a friend of mine sold out and he pulled some old cars from the slough and fence row and put them in a row and Kramer sold all of them one pos went for 500 bucks

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, wheatking said:

ya I know of 3 guys that have gone to auctions for 30 years and now they have everything everybody wants from tractors to old signs to everything

 

this spring a friend of mine sold out and he pulled some old cars from the slough and fence row and put them in a row and Kramer sold all of them one pos went for 500 bucks

I can believe it. If one of them had been a 52 Mercury with decent sheet metal I'd have paid that much too. :-)

 

52 Merc most challenging.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I still have an IH 80 combine, I don't think they were as good as the 76 was, they were building two small selfpropells at the time, an at least one of them had the same threshing and separating unit on it so it was cheaper to produce with two or three machines using the same unit. also had a neighbor that farmed with a W9 right up till about 1963 and bought a new farmall 560D to replace it.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Up here in Michigan the Massy-Harris company build and sold a lot of Clipper-50s combines in the early to mid 1950s,  They were as popular as any of the other company pull types were.  Although John Deere starting in 1940 sold a lot of 12A combines, I think that's why massy came out so strong with the clipper 50s and I think they sold for a little less in cost. Although Allis-Chalmers sold quit a few 60s and 66s too.  Farmers back then likes them for clover seed. All that seemed to chance after 1959 when the wheat price dropped and government allotments started, their just wasn't as much wheat grown after that. So the small family farmer didn't need a small pull type combine any longer.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 minutes ago, mijohn said:

Up here in Michigan the Massy-Harris company build and sold a lot of Clipper-50s combines in the early to mid 1950s,  They were as popular as any of the other company pull types were.  Although John Deere starting in 1940 sold a lot of 12A combines, I think that's why massy came out so strong with the clipper 50s and I think they sold for a little less in cost. Although Allis-Chalmers sold quit a few 60s and 66s too.  Farmers back then likes them for clover seed. All that seemed to chance after 1959 when the wheat price dropped and government allotments started, their just wasn't as much wheat grown after that. So the small family farmer didn't need a small pull type combine any longer.

There were a few Massey clipper combines around here too. As well as the JD 12A and Cockshutt had one as well. And then there was the little Allis Chalmers from 1953.

53 AC combine.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 10/31/2016 at 9:05 PM, mijohn said:

Yes, and Allis first made the little "40" straight thur in the late thirties early forties, that started IH into building the 42 pull type, The 40 could be pulled and driven with the B Allis-Chalmers. And IH advertised the 42 with the A.

Here is another unique combine. John Deere sold these Canadian Specials here in the early seventies, late sixties. I believe they were a European built machine. Said to be an economy version sold along side their other combines. 

JD Canadian Specials.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, George 2 said:

Those JD combines were a Zweibrucken, Germany product. JD had a combine plant there back when I worked for them. 

Yes This correct. We purchased a 730 JD Canadian Special in 1968.  They were a very well designed machine. Long straw-walkers, and simple and easy to adjust.  There were 4 models: 430, 530, 630 and 730.  They were all the same length, but varied in width with the 730 being 51" in width. Many parts were common to all models. All were diesel powered.  I drove ours from Winnipeg MB to Minnedosa, MB a distance of about 150 miles in one day.   CardaleBob

Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 minutes ago, CardaleBob said:

Yes This correct. We purchased a 730 JD Canadian Special in 1968.  They were a very well designed machine. Long straw-walkers, and simple and easy to adjust.  There were 4 models: 430, 530, 630 and 730.  They were all the same length, but varied in width with the 730 being 53" in width. Many parts were common to all models. All were diesel powered.  I drove ours from Winnipeg MB to Minnedosa, MB a distance of about 150 miles in one day.   CardaleBob

Those combines were tailored to the high yields in Europe so I assumed they had generous separation capacity.  According to my info they had a 24" cylinder.  That would have been nice on the American combines. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 11/4/2016 at 7:10 PM, CardaleBob said:

Yes This correct. We purchased a 730 JD Canadian Special in 1968.  They were a very well designed machine. Long straw-walkers, and simple and easy to adjust.  There were 4 models: 430, 530, 630 and 730.  They were all the same length, but varied in width with the 730 being 51" in width. Many parts were common to all models. All were diesel powered.  I drove ours from Winnipeg MB to Minnedosa, MB a distance of about 150 miles in one day.   CardaleBob

Its always interesting to hear from somebody who has used this vintage machinery. The 730 was a big machine for it's time. 

Here is the pull type 6601 from about 1969. The improved and  newer version of the 106 pull type. 

New 6601.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, Loadstar said:

Its always interesting to hear from somebody who has used this vintage machinery. The 730 was a big machine for it's time. 

Here is the pull type 6601 from about 1969. The improved and  newer version of the 106 pull type. 

New 6601.jpg

We had a 6601 for a few years. Was a real simple and easy to run combine. It was just too small for us. We went back to a 914 for straw. It blew the 6601 away in the field too!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 hours ago, Loadstar said:

Its always interesting to hear from somebody who has used this vintage machinery. The 730 was a big machine for it's time. 

Here is the pull type 6601 from about 1969. The improved and  newer version of the 106 pull type. 

 

I have the first brochure out on the 6601 dated the fall of 1968.  JD advertised you could pull the 6601 a gear faster then the 106.  The 6600/6601 was suppose to replace the 105/106 but that is disputable in the real world. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Going back to Loadstar's posting of the little A-C tow behind combine-----------made me think of this photo of a 1936 A-C calendar when my dad was selling the A-C All Crop Harvesters here in the Delta.   Don't know the model number of the All Crop Harvester for the 1936 era-------------but they were highly thought of little combines in their day.

As far as I know-------------the All Crop Harvesters were the only A-C product that my dad sold.  He used a couple here on the farm-------------and was a long time friend of the A-C blockman at that time.  A-C had very little dealer representation here in the Delta at that time.

AC calendar 1936.jpg

 

The political campaign card was dated 1948 or so-------------and I just had it stuck on top of the calendar on my office wall.  My dad and grampa were the politicians----------------not me;  ------------and he was not elected to the state legislature.  (so disregard the campaign card)

 

And-----------an ad that I swiped from somebody's posting before (most likely Loadstar's)???

AC all crop.jpg

 

DD

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 11/14/2016 at 11:58 AM, Delta Dirt said:

Going back to Loadstar's posting of the little A-C tow behind combine-----------made me think of this photo of a 1936 A-C calendar when my dad was selling the A-C All Crop Harvesters here in the Delta.   Don't know the model number of the All Crop Harvester for the 1936 era-------------but they were highly thought of little combines in their day.

As far as I know-------------the All Crop Harvesters were the only A-C product that my dad sold.  He used a couple here on the farm-------------and was a long time friend of the A-C blockman at that time.  A-C had very little dealer representation here in the Delta at that time.

 

 

The political campaign card was dated 1948 or so-------------and I just had it stuck on top of the calendar on my office wall.  My dad and grampa were the politicians----------------not me;  ------------and he was not elected to the state legislature.  (so disregard the campaign card)

 

And-----------an ad that I swiped from somebody's posting before (most likely Loadstar's)???

 

 

DD

 

 

Anson, that calendar is a real collectible you have there. And the campaign card is some neat family history. 

I've been losing track of time and see its a while since I posted an ad here. Not that I have run out of material. 

I like this 1953 Goodyear farm tire ad. That is an interesting drawbar shifting devce mounted on the fender. Never seen another like it. 

Not sure of the tractor. Maybe a Case "L"?

53 Goodyear tire ad.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Loadstar said:

Anson, that calendar is a real collectible you have there. And the campaign card is some neat family history. 

I've been losing track of time and see its a while since I posted an ad here. Not that I have run out of material. 

I like this 1953 Goodyear farm tire ad. That is an interesting drawbar shifting devce mounted on the fender. Never seen another like it. 

Not sure of the tractor. Maybe a Case "L"?

 

Definitely a Case.  Notice the PTO placement 10ft above the drawbar.  I would guess a C though because it looks too small to be an L.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 11/17/2016 at 5:01 AM, 664 CDN said:

Ralph that lever is used to keep the moldboard  plow or other pull implement cutting its full width on a side hill or on a contour ..

 

Interesting. I know nothing about pulling a plow but assumed they would need to have a swinging drawbar much the same as we did with the one way disks. 

Here is a Case ad from 1953 showing some of the bigger tractors. 

53 Case Prairie prov.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Something a little different in this vintage ad from 1952. About this time of year most kids would be studying the pages of the Eatons catalogue picking out what they might like for Christmas. There was a special edition, the Christmas catalogue that got pretty well paged through in most homes every year.

 

1952 Eatons toys small.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ralph , I was the proud owner of the Steam engine & all the accessories listed under B & D in that add.

Time frame was also about right.  I gave the engine to my Son when he got old enough & it and  most of the accessories are still in good condition.

Can`t believe  $7.49 was all it cost.

Gary , I guess that makes me an old Steam Engineer.

Ray

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well I guess $7.49 in 1952 might be equal to $200 by today's standards. My brother were lucky to get those steam engines for Christmas one year in the sixties. Its a wonder we didn't set the house on fire burning those little blocks of solid fuel to fire the boiler. I still have mine stored away somewhere in the "museum".

This was a more serious page from the same Eatons catalogue featuring horse harness and accessories. By 1952 I'd guess the for demand for harness was not what it used to be but it still showed up in the catalogues. 

Eatons harness.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

20 hours ago, Loadstar said:

Something a little different in this vintage ad from 1952. About this time of year most kids would be studying the pages of the Eatons catalogue picking out what they might like for Christmas. There was a special edition, the Christmas catalogue that got pretty well paged through in most homes every year.

 

1952 Eatons toys small.jpg

Ha!  This stuff is great!  I know that even in this day and age, my daughter would love to have the 11-piece animal, pump, and truck set. With a $0.98 price tag, I'd be willing to buy in multiples!

I didn't come on the scene until 1966, so my days of intently studying the christmas catalogs would not have started until the early 1970s, but I fondly remember doing it. In our house the catalogs would have been from Sears, JCPenney, and Monkey Wards. I recall Sears having the more interesting toys, but they were all fun to browse.

Keep the catalog pages coming....

 

Keith-

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Unfortunately, your content contains terms that we do not allow. Please edit your content to remove the highlighted words below.
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...