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clay neubauer

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11 hours ago, George 2 said:

 Maybe too many of us remembered the old NH Super 77 baler and the hassle in restarting it when it got hot and stalled out. You just had to let them cool down before trying to restart it.  

I think there are brand new Briggs & Stratton engines the same way.

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27 minutes ago, lightninboy said:

I think there are brand new Briggs & Stratton engines the same way.

I don't think I have ever seen any engine quite as hard to start as the V4 Wisconsin on my dad's model A Case combine. 

And speaking of combines, it must have been a wet harvest when they took these ad photos for the White (Cockshutt) 5542 combine in 1970. I don't recall ever seeing one with dual wheels. No doubt it would help hold them up in the mud. 

1970 5542.jpg

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Sam Moore posted this grain weigher-cleaner on a Port Huron threshing machine, from the cover of an American Thresherman in 1925. I've never seen anything like this. I've seen grain cleaners added to combines, but not this. Sam thought maybe some of us more "westerly kids" would know about these? Gary;)

A Dakota grain weigher on a Port Huron thresher Sam Moore.jpg

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Back in the late 90s I bought my 1460.  I went all over eastern Arkansas looking at 1460s.  I watched several nice ones bring over $30,000.  I found mine in the little rock classified for $13,000 in excellent condition and didn't haggle when I looked at it.  He had a very fair price.  It has served me well.

That cockshutt engine looks like a chrysler 318.  I have never seen a cockshutt of any kind (combine, tractor, etc).

Thx-Ace

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18 hours ago, Old Binder Guy said:

Sam Moore posted this grain weigher-cleaner on a Port Huron threshing machine, from the cover of an American Thresherman in 1925. I've never seen anything like this. I've seen grain cleaners added to combines, but not this. Sam thought maybe some of us more "westerly kids" would know about these? Gary;)

 

Gary that magazine cover you posted is a real work of art. I've heard of weighers on the old threshers but not much of cleaners. My dad had the "roto cleaner" option on his Case pull type model A combine. It was mounted over the grain tank with a separate down spout to funnel the weed seeds and cracked grain out. There was a small platform for bags but what a job it would have been keeping that working by yourself. I don't recall him using it . I could not find an ad for the model A but this newer 1960 Case model 80 is similar and has the roto cleaner. 

 

60 Case PT combine.jpg

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12 hours ago, acem said:

 

That cockshutt engine looks like a chrysler 318.  I have never seen a cockshutt of any kind (combine, tractor, etc).

Thx-Ace

That is a Chrysler 318 in the Cockshutt. Nice smooth running engine as I recall. You probably had the same machine down South but painted green and named "Oliver" as they were the same combine. I have some video of one working picking up oat swaths back in 1997 on youtube. Interesting to see that ground producing crop as it has been under water for the past 7 years or more. 

 

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5 hours ago, Loadstar said:

Gary that magazine cover you posted is a real work of art. I've heard of weighers on the old threshers but not much of cleaners. My dad had the "roto cleaner" option on his Case pull type model A combine. It was mounted over the grain tank with a separate down spout to funnel the weed seeds and cracked grain out. There was a small platform for bags but what a job it would have been keeping that working by yourself. I don't recall him using it . I could not find an ad for the model A but this newer 1960 Case model 80 is similar and has the roto cleaner. 

 

60 Case PT combine.jpg

Called a Scour Kleen where I grew up. Excellent piece of equipment.

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On 10/16/2016 at 1:18 PM, George 2 said:

Called a Scour Kleen where I grew up. Excellent piece of equipment.

Yes, I think maybe Massey called their's the roto cleaner. 

Been nearly 3 weeks since any decent combining weather happened here so I'll just post another vintage IH combine ad. Seems like several companies made a version of the wide body combines like this 64. John Deere had their 12A. Massey had the clipper. Cockshutt had one too. 

 

53 McCormick 64 combine.jpg

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Very nice colour ads of the 64. 

By 1960 IH was still making a full width combine and called it the model 80 as seen in this ad showing the whole line.

60 IH combines.jpg

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Have a neighbor running a Oliver Combine like the Cockshutt and Oliver in the pictures at start of post.. Has had it a few tears and it wass a real cream puff when he bought it and is still used and well taken care of..

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Never been close to a combine but at a show.  Lets for example say we ran a 80 McC along a new 8240 CIH.  Besides speed what would we see?  Less blow though?  Better sample?  I am wondering does each generation do 10% better job?  A 1460 vs a 2288 big dif?  A 8240 vs a 1460 better?  Thanks

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28 minutes ago, TroyDairy said:

Never been close to a combine but at a show.  Lets for example say we ran a 80 McC along a new 8240 CIH.  Besides speed what would we see?  Less blow though?  Better sample?  I am wondering does each generation do 10% better job?  A 1460 vs a 2288 big dif?  A 8240 vs a 1460 better?  Thanks

Each new design almost doubles capacity of the earlier design. A 1460 in wheat running 60 will maybe do 40 acres a day a new 9240 running in the same or better wheat will do at least 160. The 1460 will run 1.8 mph the 9240  3 but would handle it at 5 mph. Granted when 1460/ 80 came out the wheat and corn yield was probably half what it is now. When the 1460 came out they were a huge combine compared to the older ones. One thing every one forgets is Massey had a huge combine in the early 70s a 60 inch cylinder able to handle 30 ft headers . They were a little finicky but were a capable machine.That is like the combines of today being able to run a 60 ft header if they could

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12 minutes ago, dale560 said:

Each new design almost doubles capacity of the earlier design. A 1460 in wheat running 60 will maybe do 40 acres a day a new 9240 running in the same or better wheat will do at least 160. The 1460 will run 1.8 mph the 9240  3 but would handle it at 5 mph. Granted when 1460/ 80 came out the wheat and corn yield was probably half what it is now. When the 1460 came out they were a huge combine compared to the older ones. One thing every one forgets is Massey had a huge combine in the early 70s a 60 inch cylinder able to handle 30 ft headers . They were a little finicky but were a capable machine.That is like the combines of today being able to run a 60 ft header if they could

I remember the "new" 760 Massey and what a huge machine it seemed  with that 60 inch wide cylinder. My dad's model 60 was about 28 inches wide. They seemed worlds apart. Massey sold a lot of them here in Sask. I know I"ve posted better ads of them already but here is one I don't think I've posted yet. Late seventies I'd guess. I think this is one of the newer silver top cabs Early models had the white top and yellow wheels. 

MF new Perkins power.jpg

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Everybody done here red or green had masseys except my dad. Neighbor used to go south combining he started with 510 then went up the chain to 850s.  Moms uncle had a 550 .The other neighbors son moved to Oklahoma and combined his way north and back every year with 510s .he would load them on the back of trucks and haul them around.

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OB guy is right.  Massey was extremely popular in MT.  We ran Massey going back to the 21A days but the last one we had was a grey cab 760.  Traded in two Massey 510s one a 1964 and the other 1975 Western Special for the 760.  What prompted the trade was the newer 510 wouldn't run worth a hoot.  It got to the point the mechanic was switching out parts with the 76' Chevy pickup we had sitting there.  Finally got it running good but after he took off the engine started misfiring again.  We drove them up to Milk River that night and brought home a new 760.  It had the 354 Perkins.  It didn't lack for power because it only had a belt drive transmission.  We only had it 3 years before we traded it for a 8820 our first JD combine.  BTW, the S-100 in the 4020 picture is also in this picture. 

760-8820.jpg

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13 hours ago, dale560 said:

Each new design almost doubles capacity of the earlier design. A 1460 in wheat running 60 will maybe do 40 acres a day a new 9240 running in the same or better wheat will do at least 160. The 1460 will run 1.8 mph the 9240  3 but would handle it at 5 mph. Granted when 1460/ 80 came out the wheat and corn yield was probably half what it is now. When the 1460 came out they were a huge combine compared to the older ones. One thing every one forgets is Massey had a huge combine in the early 70s a 60 inch cylinder able to handle 30 ft headers . They were a little finicky but were a capable machine.That is like the combines of today being able to run a 60 ft header if they could

Are you stopping to dump in those scenarios because those seem a little low on acres cut a day?  Massey didn't offer a 30ft header initially.  They did advertise you can sit a Volkswagen on the walkers and still have room to open the doors.  The 760 wasn't surpassed by size until the 8820 came out in late 1978. 

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Yes I am out in the field mostly myself combining.so I stop and dump a lot. This is in spring wheat also goes through hard. We run the 2188 now and last year I could average about 85 acres a day in late August. Wheat was running about 57 hauled into town but my brother was driving truck then so I didn't have to do that to. You can do more or less with each combine though. Our neighbors run 9240s they don't push them though do about a 160 a combine a day in high yeilding wheat around 75 bpa. I never realized how much capacity an 8820 has to but the 2188 will stay ahead of it.We bought one 5 years ago came from Montana new my brother financed it for the 2nd owner when he bought it with 600 hours we bought it a consignment sale when he was getting rid of his stuff not retiring just clearing out to make room for more new stuff. It had 5000 hours then but looked like new. It is an 88 model Titan 11.

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13 minutes ago, dale560 said:

Yes I am out in the field mostly myself combining.so I stop and dump a lot. This is in spring wheat also goes through hard. We run the 2188 now and last year I could average about 85 acres a day in late August. Wheat was running about 57 hauled into town but my brother was driving truck then so I didn't have to do that to. You can do more or less with each combine though. Our neighbors run 9240s they don't push them though do about a 160 a combine a day in high yeilding wheat around 75 bpa. I never realized how much capacity an 8820 has to but the 2188 will stay ahead of it.We bought one 5 years ago came from Montana new my brother financed it for the 2nd owner when he bought it with 600 hours we bought it a consignment sale when he was getting rid of his stuff not retiring just clearing out to make room for more new stuff. It had 5000 hours then but looked like new. It is an 88 model Titan 11.

That does make a huge difference.  We clear 160 acres most days easy with S670s but we are dumping on the go.  Our typical yields are 40-70 bpa in the spring wheat and winter wheat.  We had a 1985 T2 8820.  It was the first T2 the local dealer got in.  We traded the yellow top 8820 in the picture a few posts above for this one.  Then it eventually got traded for a 9600.  Took a step forward in convenience and comfort but maybe a lateral step or even backwards on some of the other stuff.  In my opinion the 20s were the last truly great combines JD had.   

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I would agree Big Bud Guy, that the 7720 and 8820 were great conventional combines. My brother in laws have had both and they gave excellent service. Excellent machines. In this area the 9600, 9610 and 9650W combines worked well also. But once they hit the axial flow versions it has gone to h*** in a hand basket. The older ones like the 9650 run dirt cheap at auction and the 9660 and 9770 are being traded off to some degree on other makes. But they hit rock bottom with the new S series. My Deere friend tells me they have been one problem after another and are getting difficult to trade off on other makes due to their reputation. As an example, a brand new this year S680 a few miles from me had a failed header drive gearbox in wheat this past summer. It will be interesting to see if it stays or goes at the end of the season. And they still have the grinding problem in corn over 20% moisture.           

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3 hours ago, George 2 said:

I would agree Big Bud Guy, that the 7720 and 8820 were great conventional combines. My brother in laws have had both and they gave excellent service. Excellent machines. In this area the 9600, 9610 and 9650W combines worked well also. But once they hit the axial flow versions it has gone to h*** in a hand basket. The older ones like the 9650 run dirt cheap at auction and the 9660 and 9770 are being traded off to some degree on other makes. But they hit rock bottom with the new S series. My Deere friend tells me they have been one problem after another and are getting difficult to trade off on other makes due to their reputation. As an example, a brand new this year S680 a few miles from me had a failed header drive gearbox in wheat this past summer. It will be interesting to see if it stays or goes at the end of the season. And they still have the grinding problem in corn over 20% moisture.           

Can't comment on the newer John Deeres but I see a few of them working around here. My only experience with the 20 series is my pull type 7721. It does have great swath eating capacity but I've yet to put in a good long day with it to see what it does for acres. In this hilly, slough and bush country I lose a lot of time on corners with a pull type. The 7721 might outrun the 1660 axial on a straight run open field but the 1660 would likely do more acres at the end of the day due to hydro drive and self propelled maneuverability. Any time I can do 60 acres in a day i am more than satisfied with these machines. Often it is less. Canola swaths were heavy going this year. Took me 3 days on a 90 acre field.

Something a little older here is this model 60 Massey pull type from 1954. I would not want to do a lot of acres with it but it would be fun to do a few with it behind a vintage tractor for a change. 

54 MH 60 PT.jpg

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