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Vintage Ads


clay neubauer

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Actually a Super C. I have the original IH brochure showing this attachment and it includes pictures of it used in the Holland Marsh. You will note the higher grille and space between the Touch Control unit and the gas tank that distinguished the super c from the straight C.

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Actually a Super C. I have the original IH brochure showing this attachment and it includes pictures of it used in the Holland Marsh. You will note the higher grille and space between the Touch Control unit and the gas tank that distinguished the super c from the straight C.

Not to be critical of Ralph, as I've mis-stated things, so can't throw rocks when living in a glass house, but George 2 is correct. Plus, the Farmall A had a gear reduction in the final drives, where the C was like the H & M, with their axles. Gary ;)

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Actually a Super C. I have the original IH brochure showing this attachment and it includes pictures of it used in the Holland Marsh. You will note the higher grille and space between the Touch Control unit and the gas tank that distinguished the super c from the straight C.

Not to be critical of Ralph, as I've mis-stated things, so can't throw rocks when living in a glass house, but George 2 is correct. Plus, the Farmall A had a gear reduction in the final drives, where the C was like the H & M, with their axles. Gary ;)

I have no problem with you guys correcting my mistakes on identifying tractors. It shows you are paying attention :-) And if I can't read the letter/number on the hood I can't be sure on some of these ads.

Now here is a new idea, I mean really a New Idea! 1949 manure spreader. From what I can read New Idea built the first mechanical manure spreader. The company was eventually bought up by White farm equipment, later becoming part of Agco and so on, etc.

post-90-0-88226300-1451278491_thumb.jpg

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Ralph I loaded one of those spreaders many times by hand eg: pitch fork.

After we got a front end loader the old New Idea seamed to start giving a lot of trouble & was traded for a New Holland.

Ray

A manure spreader would have been a real luxury when we were kids Ray. We had to load it by hand (manure fork) onto a flat top wagon and then unload it all , again by fork, out in the field. Farm kids in those days got strong hands from milking cows and forking manure. Not a bad thing but those days are gone.

These good looking IH manure spreaders were available in 1979.

post-90-0-56273600-1451400966_thumb.jpg

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Ralph I loaded one of those spreaders many times by hand eg: pitch fork.

After we got a front end loader the old New Idea seamed to start giving a lot of trouble & was traded for a New Holland.

Ray

A manure spreader would have been a real luxury when we were kids Ray. We had to load it by hand (manure fork) onto a flat top wagon and then unload it all , again by fork, out in the field. Farm kids in those days got strong hands from milking cows and forking manure. Not a bad thing but those days are gone.

These good looking IH manure spreaders were available in 1979.

Interesting how in the ad, they didn't even bother to wash the tires. In almost non working ads for IH, they made sure the tractors really stood out & were shiny. But maybe it isn't as important to shine something up that will be covered in sh*t it's entire life.

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These good looking IH manure spreaders were available in 1979.

So THAT'S what they look like with paint! LOL

We had a 560 spreader with a hydraulic tailgate. It was a nice simple spreader. Like all daily-use-in-a-Wisconsin-winter spreaders, it wasn't the best for getting clean in sub-zero weather. The wet slop instantly froze to the steel sides and wood floor. We replaced it with our current spreader which has plastic sides and floor. Really nice in the cold.

Keith-

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Well Ralph, I also remember loading manure on a flat rack sled then taking it out to a pile in the field to be reloaded into a spreader by hand in the spring.

never hand spread in the field.

As long as the tractor could get around in the snow covered fields with the loaded wagon we spread it evenly by hand. When snow got too deep then we started building a pile.

Here is a similar ad to one I posted not long ago of the 60 series tractors. This one shows the farm sized crawler tractors too. From 1960.

post-90-0-72258400-1451442876_thumb.jpg

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Maybe the last vintage ad for 2015 and lets make it an International. An S160 much like the one in my shed.

Everybody is smiling and waving, and NOT watching the unloading and how close the box is to running over.

I guess if a pretty girl carrying a picnic basket came walking through my field I might get distractred from the combining job temporarily too. :-)

And CaseIHCS68, that is a nice McCormick pull type combine ad too.

I have another colour pull type ad here from 1968. I can see a slight family resemblance to my 7721 even though it is 20 years newer.

post-90-0-74191500-1451764814_thumb.jpg

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Maybe the last vintage ad for 2015 and lets make it an International. An S160 much like the one in my shed.

Everybody is smiling and waving, and NOT watching the unloading and how close the box is to running over.

I guess if a pretty girl carrying a picnic basket came walking through my field I might get distractred from the combining job temporarily too. :-)

And CaseIHCS68, that is a nice McCormick pull type combine ad too.

I have another colour pull type ad here from 1968. I can see a slight family resemblance to my 7721 even though it is 20 years newer.

Here is one with an even bigger resemblance. Got this out of a brochure dated October 1968. The 106 should be a very rare combine as they were only made for 2 years. Makes me wonder why JD even bothered with it since they were going to replace so soon with the 6601.

post-79528-0-14651900-1451778544_thumb.j

post-79528-0-77019900-1451778558_thumb.j

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Here is one with an even bigger resemblance. Got this out of a brochure dated October 1968. The 106 should be a very rare combine as they were only made for 2 years. Makes me wonder why JD even bothered with it since they were going to replace so soon with the 6601.

Thanks to everyone posting these ads. I love looking at them and seeing how things have changed, and stayed the same!

That 6601 sure is low profile, but they forgot to mention in the ad that you have to take the chopper right off to drop straw!

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Here is one with an even bigger resemblance. Got this out of a brochure dated October 1968. The 106 should be a very rare combine as they were only made for 2 years. Makes me wonder why JD even bothered with it since they were going to replace so soon with the 6601.

Thanks to everyone posting these ads. I love looking at them and seeing how things have changed, and stayed the same!

That 6601 sure is low profile, but they forgot to mention in the ad that you have to take the chopper right off to drop straw!

One of the reasons JD moved the engine up front next to you was to make room for a bigger grain tank and keep the profile low.

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Here is one with an even bigger resemblance. Got this out of a brochure dated October 1968. The 106 should be a very rare combine as they were only made for 2 years. Makes me wonder why JD even bothered with it since they were going to replace so soon with the 6601.

Thanks to everyone posting these ads. I love looking at them and seeing how things have changed, and stayed the same!

That 6601 sure is low profile, but they forgot to mention in the ad that you have to take the chopper right off to drop straw!

I wonder if you could do like I do with the 7721. Avoid lifting and removing that 50 some inch wide chopper to drop windrows by just removing the deflector vanes except the outer vanes. Reverse them so they "funnel" the straw inwards. Back off the chopper knives so it is just basically blowing the straw out in a row. I do that all the time with the 7721 and it works great.

BBG that 6601 looks small compared to my 7721 but it was huge to anyone used to an old model 65 pull type. I forgot to mark the date on this scan but judging by the tractor I'd guess it at 1960. JD sold a lot of these combines here.

post-90-0-75389500-1451785019_thumb.jpg

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Maybe the last vintage ad for 2015 and lets make it an International. An S160 much like the one in my shed.

Everybody is smiling and waving, and NOT watching the unloading and how close the box is to running over.

I guess if a pretty girl carrying a picnic basket came walking through my field I might get distractred from the combining job temporarily too. :-)

And CaseIHCS68, that is a nice McCormick pull type combine ad too.

I have another colour pull type ad here from 1968. I can see a slight family resemblance to my 7721 even though it is 20 years newer.

I'm glad I wasn't driving that 5020 over that bridge. No room for error there.

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Here is one with an even bigger resemblance. Got this out of a brochure dated October 1968. The 106 should be a very rare combine as they were only made for 2 years. Makes me wonder why JD even bothered with it since they were going to replace so soon with the 6601.

Thanks to everyone posting these ads. I love looking at them and seeing how things have changed, and stayed the same!

That 6601 sure is low profile, but they forgot to mention in the ad that you have to take the chopper right off to drop straw!

I wonder if you could do like I do with the 7721. Avoid lifting and removing that 50 some inch wide chopper to drop windrows by just removing the deflector vanes except the outer vanes. Reverse them so they "funnel" the straw inwards. Back off the chopper knives so it is just basically blowing the straw out in a row. I do that all the time with the 7721 and it works great.

BBG that 6601 looks small compared to my 7721 but it was huge to anyone used to an old model 65 pull type. I forgot to mark the date on this scan but judging by the tractor I'd guess it at 1960. JD sold a lot of these combines here.

We solved the chopper removal pretty easily.

Bought a 914 and sold the 6601!!!!!!

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Ralph,

I found this on Facebook, just for you! A one ton Fargo truck ad. Gary ;)

That is a nice truck ad Gary. My brother has a Fargo too but about 15 years newer. Not much family resemblance there.

Here is an International ad for the S series trucks . New for 56.

post-90-0-90037700-1451884834_thumb.jpg

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Ralph,

I found this on Facebook, just for you! A one ton Fargo truck ad. Gary ;)

That is a nice truck ad Gary. My brother has a Fargo too but about 15 years newer. Not much family resemblance there.

Here is an International ad for the S series trucks . New for 56.

There is that trucker hat in that IH ad that was discussed a few pages back.

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