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Vintage Ads


clay neubauer

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Ralph,

The boys have posted some nice ads today. Now I like Anson's Universal ad, but if he were running that new M&M Universal, and had that red dress, high heel shoe lady come to the field, I doubt there'd be much plowing accomplished?

Gary ;)

Gary, those REmington ads are a real work of art. And Anson's Universal tractor does not even have a "buddy seat" on it. ;)

It shows how far we had come by 1971 when the new Case 70 series cabs offered a spacious and comfortable atmosphere for the modern farmer to relax in while working. Well, they were a pretty big cab. :P

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Ralph,

The boys have posted some nice ads today. Now I like Anson's Universal ad, but if he were running that new M&M Universal, and had that red dress, high heel shoe lady come to the field, I doubt there'd be much plowing accomplished?

Gary ;)

Gary, those REmington ads are a real work of art. And Anson's Universal tractor does not even have a "buddy seat" on it. ;)

It shows how far we had come by 1971 when the new Case 70 series cabs offered a spacious and comfortable atmosphere for the modern farmer to relax in while working. Well, they were a pretty big cab. :P

i can honestly say that if my 1370 came with a french maid, id probably have spent more time in it. as it was i still couldnt reach all the pedals at age 10.

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i belive mm adopted " universal" for it's row crop tractors, after the universal "d" was dropped . later , just adding a U to the end of the models rtu, ztu, utu.

I think so. The U was one of the most popular tractors around here in the fifties, sixties. Wide front Us could be seen on many farms as the main workhorse. In later years they saw duty as the chore tractor for light duty stuff. My dad wanted to get one after WWII but new tractors were very hard to get in those days so he never did get a U.

This ad from 1954 shows the U pulling a Minneapolis disker.

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Gary, I notice those Big Fours in the last pictures you posted have the early version of "auto steer". :P I wonder just how well that worked?

Well since we are into March now I will post this "Harvester's March Message" ad from 1948 featuring a good looking KB series truck.

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Ralph,

I have no idea how well those auto steering devices worked? Several companies used them, so they couldn't have worked too bad on straight runs. Our problem would have been creek bottom plowing, making it too crooked for them, I'll bet. Much of our ground wasn't worked "straight," but "knap of the creek" meandering.

That sure is a nice KB-5 ad you posted. I've mentioned before, our family had several of the B series, and Dad had a plain K-5. The B series added a lot of nice touches. The K had almost a canvas seat, likely a leftover from WWII? The KB seats almost looked like leather color, but I remember some with green seats too. There may have been several colors? Gary ;)

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That sure is a nice KB-5 ad you posted. I've mentioned before, our family had several of the B series, and Dad had a plain K-5. The B series added a lot of nice touches. The K had almost a canvas seat, likely a leftover from WWII? The KB seats almost looked like leather color, but I remember some with green seats too. There may have been several colors? Gary ;)

Gary, I don't know what the K series trucks had for upholstery as the KB3 I have does not have a seat in it. It got lost along with a few other parts over the years. I wonder if IH took this next ad photo at the same building ten years after the KB5 ad? The A series truck seen here is from a 1958 Family Herald ad.

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You guys are moving too fast for me ,Finally found this Minny Mo ad and you were knee deep in trucks :)

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And just maybe, a little more than you need to know 1940 test data

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Ralph & Kevin,

I remembered these photos I had that I took at a show years ago, but I can't remember for sure where? I think I had been at Antique Acres at Cedar Falls, Iowa, but I can't remember for sure if the tractors were there or not? This first one is an R with a factory cab.

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This is the infamous UDLX you could farm with all week, then take the family to church on Sunday. Gary ;)

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Always learning something from the Professor.

My dad had a K-7 or KB-7;--------now I know it was a K-7 based on the "canvas style" seat cover Gary described.

Funny-----but I don't know when or where he disposed of it. Do remember him buying a used F-7 tractor along with a huge (28 or 30 ft) single axle grain trailer.

And funny--------but I have followed along on the "7" series sized trucks. Ran a F-750 back when farming-------and then currently with the F-700 "watermelon truck".

Father/son-------both always expecting the poor old truck to do more than it was designed to do. Know none of ya'll ever did that!!!

DD

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Kevin, those are some nice Minneapolis ads that I have never seen before. The overhead view of the Z looks much the same as the one in this ad I have from 1937. That 15 mph road gear was pretty fast for it's time. I have heard that most of the "minis" had a good high road gear.

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Ralph & Kevin,

I remembered these photos I had that I took at a show years ago, but I can't remember for sure where? I think I had been at Antique Acres at Cedar Falls, Iowa, but I can't remember for sure if the tractors were there or not? This first one is an R with a factory cab.

attachicon.gifMinneapolis Moline R with cab.jpg

This is the infamous UDLX you could farm with all week, then take the family to church on Sunday. Gary ;)

attachicon.gifMinneapolis Moline UDLX.jpg

Gary,

Those photos are at Antique Acres.

Ron

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"I have heard that most of the "minis" had a good high road gear."

After checking the Nebraska tests the standard "U" had a 20.1 mph High Gear !!!

It's no wonder they put a nice cab on them and drove to town :)

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"I have heard that most of the "minis" had a good high road gear."

After checking the Nebraska tests the standard "U" had a 20.1 mph High Gear !!!

It's no wonder they put a nice cab on them and drove to town :)

My dad used to talk of a neighbour in the 1940s that drove his tractor to town just like you might with a car or truck because it had a really high road gear. I think it was Model U but no cab. I don't think MM ever sold any of the cab "comfort tractor" models here. In fact I have not even seen them advertised here. I guess a cab in those days would have been regarded as an extravagent waste of scarce funds on such an item of luxury.

I like this line of Minneapolis balers at work at the bottom of this 1950 ad.

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Ralph & Kevin,

I remembered these photos I had that I took at a show years ago, but I can't remember for sure where? I think I had been at Antique Acres at Cedar Falls, Iowa, but I can't remember for sure if the tractors were there or not? This first one is an R with a factory cab.

attachicon.gifMinneapolis Moline R with cab.jpg

This is the infamous UDLX you could farm with all week, then take the family to church on Sunday. Gary ;)

attachicon.gifMinneapolis Moline UDLX.jpg

Gary,

Those photos are at Antique Acres.

Ron

Thank you Ron. I was at Antique Acres and also Mt. Pleasant and couldn't remember which. That trip was in 1992 when these pictures were taken of me with the 40 hp Reeves. The late Smolik Bros. had invited me to their show to run their engine "from Montana."

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I visited with Ray and Ed for over an hour and got some great history of the engine I'd been wanting.

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Lots of steam men around Montana wanted this exhorbitantly high priced engine and nobody was willing to pay what the Pugsley Bros. wanted for it. They were asking $3,000, in the early 1950's; or roughly the price of a brand new Cadillac. They were trying to keep it a secret, so it wouldn't leave the area. Ed & Ray came to Montana in 1955 and stopped for a sandwich at a bar/cafe at Conrad, Montana - probably 100 miles from this engine at that time - and whether it was fate, or the brothers were on their knees that morning, who knows? Ed asked the bartender, "Do you know of any BIG steam engines around here?" The bartender said, "You need to go ask that guy playing pool over there." It was one of the Pugsley brothers. They went to the Pugsley ranch on the Marias River below Tiber Dam. They had a meal and Ed eventually left a check for $2750 with them. Ed reiterated, every month I'd check my bank's checking account, No luck. Then several months later, the check came through, cashed. He said, "I was elated to know we owned a 40 hp Reeves!" The rest is history. The engine left Montana a couple years later, but I've been blessed to have gotten to plow with it twice now. Bob Pugsley is in the photo below, when the Reeves still set at their ranch in Montana. He is the only one of the brothers I ever visited with. Gary ;)

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PS: Ralph, a gentleman I used to know at Hilger, Montana owned a Minneapolis-Moline UDLX. I used to see it setting in an open front shed there when I went to check pasture in another lifetime, when I was on the homestead near Lewistown, Montana. I've often wondered where that tractor went? I know it wasn't scrapped, as Ben sort of knew he had something of value!

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This is the infamous UDLX you could farm with all week, then take the family to church on Sunday. Gary ;)

. Gary ;)

PS: Ralph, a gentleman I used to know at Hilger, Montana owned a Minneapolis-Moline UDLX. I used to see it setting in an open front shed there when I went to check pasture in another lifetime, when I was on the homestead near Lewistown, Montana. I've often wondered where that tractor went? I know it wasn't scrapped, as Ben sort of knew he had something of value!

Gary,lets hope none of those "Comfortractors" as MM sometimes referred to them, did get scrapped. I think they were rare enough that most would save them.

Now this picture is not an ad but as I mentioned earlier that some of my vintage ads come from the Family Herald magazine, I thought I might post this cover photo from May, 1959. Looks like a Case (400?) tractor running a Case hammer mill. Loading the chopped grain into a GM truck. Notice the price of the magazine?10 cents. Heck of a bargain.

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Gary,

I was spraying sweetcorn in 1992 for the canning factory at Ackley, only 35 miles away. I went over to Antique Acres and have the show pin for the MM around somewhere. I always liked that place in those days, anyway. You paid once, got a pin, and were good for the whole function. Come and go as you please. Just hang on to the pin. I was there every year from '92 to 2007. Sometimes only for a couple hours and sometimes most of the day. Enjoyable.

Ron

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A local farm family/ grain elevator operator/ MM implement dealer, had a cab equipped R I think it is. The cab was to keep the youngsters from falling out when riding with dad while farming. After the children grew up, the cab was removed and eventually sold. When in later years they learned the value of what they had sold, they bought another cab. I kind of think it was their original one but I am not sure of that. At any rate, around 35 grand was spent on that tractor and it is now back like the day it was new. A granddaughter of the original owner has it and several other MM pieces of equipment and tractors in a very nice collection.

Ron

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Ron,

The 1992 show was my second show at "Antique Acres." In 1958, I attended the "Second Annual Blackhawk Show" at the Cedar Falls show grounds. Nobody there wants to talk about the "differences" between the shows, but although some of the same people, there was dissension there in the ranks, I think. At the 1958 2nd annual show, I have this picture of myself and Dean Bellinger on the late Justin J. Hingtgen's 30 hp (9hp) Case engine, parked near the Smolik Brother's 110 hp Case at the coal pile.

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Ron, it sounds like you and I may have matching show buttons? In 1992, This picture was taken of me on Dean Bellinger's 20 hp Advance-Rumely Universal steam engine. There is a short story book that could be (has been?) written about this engine and the fire it barely survived to come back again, much prettier and mechanically perfect that it was in this picture. But that's another story. This Universal was also owned at one time by the late Hingtgen, and was dumped onto its right side while being loaded onto a steel deck low boy truck trailer.... under steam.

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This was a picture of the Bellinger's plowing with the Universal at that 1992 show.

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Also at that same show, around those Minneapolis-Moline tractors from my former post, was this Moline Universal that should turn Anson's crank! Gary ;)

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Maybe this ad will get the Babbitt heated up :)

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Here is a 1918 model , These tractors were pretty modern ,By now sporting a 4 cylinder and offering electric start, lights , And an electric governor ,

Anybody have an idea how this governor functioned ??

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There was some discussion over on the IH Tractor On Montana Farm thread regarding IH D series trucks. Rather than confuse things too much I will post the ad here as I know Gary stops by once in a while. This is a 1947 ad showing the KB 6 taking on a load of dirt. GVW of 14,500 pounds but using IH's "point rating system" they allowed an increase to 16,000 pounds for other jobs. I would guess that GVW was exceeded about a hundred percent of the time.

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There was some discussion over on the IH Tractor On Montana Farm thread regarding IH D series trucks. Rather than confuse things too much I will post the ad here as I know Gary stops by once in a while. This is a 1947 ad showing the KB 6 taking on a load of dirt. GVW of 14,500 pounds but using IH's "point rating system" they allowed an increase to 16,000 pounds for other jobs. I would guess that GVW was exceeded about a hundred percent of the time.

Ralph,

I stated over on the Montana thread how I liked listening to the 6-cylinder engine used in the KB-6 engines. Does anybody know: was that a 282 cubic inch engine? I had a 1960 B-170 with a non-synchromatic 5-speed transmission and that engine. I sure liked that truck. I remember it as being 282 CU IN, or one cube smaller than the Chevy V-8 of that time period. Gary ;)

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