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Vintage Ads


clay neubauer

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dynaflow, or some spelling like it was what I remember in a 56/58 Buick as I had a 56 hard top special ( three port hole on finders) Ron. The hydros were in the olds, Pontiac, Cad etc. ( I think)

HD, here is your 56 Buick, although this one has an extra porthole. Was that the Roadmaster? And yes, they do refer to the dynaflow "variable pitch" . Along with the big 364 engine I guess it was a nice driver. I'd take one.

Edit, on second thought, this car is actually a 57 Buick.

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Ralph: That cartoon ad for Lion brand rope actually happened to me. I was given the job of running the new Super C tractor pulling the hayfork rope in 1953 when I was 7 years old. Dad was in the mow mowing the loose hay and Mom was on the wagon operating the hayfork. One of the two wagons we had was an old Electric Wheel Co wagon with outsides of the floor having slotted floorboards above the wheels. One day by accident Mom latched the hayfork hooks under the floorboards and when the tractor started pulling on the rope one corner of the wagon (with the horses still hitched to it) started to lift up. Mom was frantically yelling at dad to tell me to stop, and then I heard Dad yelling to stop. By the time I got stopped, the left rear side of the wagon was about 4 feet in the air, and some hay was spilled over the side on the front. Nothing got broke and we all had a bit of a laugh about it. Shortly after Dad filled in all the slots with plywood and we never had any more incidents. But that ad sure brings back that memory to me. Thanks for the ad.

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And then Chevrolet came with the Turboglide in 1958, almost going back to the first Powerglide Ron described! A friend had a 1958 Impala with tri-power and a Turboglide. It almost reminded me of a 1947 Buick taking off. Sort of like flushing a toilet for sound. Gary ;)

Gary,

A friend of mine has a '58 Impala 348, 3 deuces, originally a Turboglide. Fortunately, for driving purposes, the Turboglide is gone. It has a Turbo Hydramatic in its place. 3 speeds, but a much better transmission. Those old Buicks, I think the transmission was called a Hydramatic, were called a slushbox around these parts. You described it well.

Ron

Ron,

"Slush box" and "Dyna flush" were the two names we had for the old Buicks with straight 8's.

Ralph,

You neglected to say what the prize was for submitting the oldest ad?

Gary :ph34r:

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Ron,

"Slush box" and "Dyna flush" were the two names we had for the old Buicks with straight 8's.

Ralph,

You neglected to say what the prize was for submitting the oldest ad?

Gary :ph34r:

Gary, I was afraid you might ask that question. Since there is no prize, other than an honorable mention, I will just post another 55 Roadmaster ad. The dynaflow transmission was standard on the Roadmaster and optional on the lower priced models. Dagmars and dynaflows, how can you not love those fifties cars? :)

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dynaflow, or some spelling like it was what I remember in a 56/58 Buick as I had a 56 hard top special ( three port hole on finders) Ron. The hydros were in the olds, Pontiac, Cad etc. ( I think)

Yep. I stand corrected.

Ron

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dynaflow, or some spelling like it was what I remember in a 56/58 Buick as I had a 56 hard top special ( three port hole on finders) Ron. The hydros were in the olds, Pontiac, Cad etc. ( I think)

HD, here is your 56 Buick, although this one has an extra porthole. Was that the Roadmaster? And yes, they do refer to the dynaflow "variable pitch" . Along with the big 364 engine I guess it was a nice driver. I'd take one.

Edit, on second thought, this car is actually a 57 Buick.

Ralph, the special had three portholes, the century and roadmaster had four. I still think that I would agree with you on liking to have a 57 like the one in your add. :wub:

not gona say this was smart, but in my 56 special with the "variable pitch" dynaflow I, (or someone I know very well) found that the Buick could darned sure hold it's own, and often times beat the 56 Olds 88 in a "out in the country" drag race by putting the dynaflow in low range and leaving it till reaching 80 mph before shifting to drive. :wacko::wacko:

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not gona say this was smart, but in my 56 special with the "variable pitch" dynaflow I, (or someone I know very well) found that the Buick could darned sure hold it's own, and often times beat the 56 Olds 88 in a "out in the country" drag race by putting the dynaflow in low range and leaving it till reaching 80 mph before shifting to drive. :wacko::wacko:

Those Olds engines must have handled high rpm quite well. That would have made a good youtube video ^_^

While still on the GM subject, I was surprised to learn that GM made aircraft engines and propellers as seen in this 1956 GM Aeroproducts ad.

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Here is a brief history of Allison Corp

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And a couple of pictures of one of their airplane engines

Notice the caption Gun synchronizer

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Ralph & kevingweq,

That's interesting about GM aircraft engines. I probably heard, but didn't realize all that was happening there.

Ralph, I have nothing to post of any value, so will post this page from the 1914 Case engine catalog, showing the pride the company had in their 1913 Case 110 hp engines at Winnipeg with efficiency trials. Ironically, by the time this catalog was in buyer's hands, Case was no longer building the mighty 110 hp Case. Stock on hand would continue to be sold for likely nearly a decade. For all purposes generally, the prairie was broken by 1912-13, in the Canadian and the US west, so the need for large breaking tractors was dwindling. And a little more dependable gas tractors were making great inroads into steam territory.

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As a side note, I asked a friend with Stanley steam cars, "Why did the steam car fail to continue?" He stated, "Even the Model T, you could turn the key, step on the starter and be heading down the road." The Stanley Steam Car was a fast steam builder, but it still took "minutes" to get you going down the road. Steam engines were no different. If you wanted to pull a stump with a cold steam engine, it was a matter of hours, not minutes, even if the boiler was filled with water; to get the thing going with enough power to pull stumps. I put a picture on of me and my late friend Austin Monk, going to plow, pulling the 20-bottom JOHN DEERE plow with his 40 hp Peerless steam engine at Belgrade, Montana back in the late 1980s.

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While my mind has reminisced about steam in the 60 years I've been running them, how great a feeling it is to operate them and the massive job they'd do. But, it was just the word "reminisced" that was key to that statement. I'll continue to reminisce until I'm gone or unable to. Gary ;)

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Thanks for the background info on Allison Kevin. The name lives on in their truck transmissions.

Gary, I guess the steam powered machinery lost favor in that it took too long to get ready. Sort of the same deal as getting the horses harnessed up to work. A tractor that you could turn the switch (or crank) and go to work must have looked like a real advantage to the average farmer.

Here are some handy looking IH tractors in a 1958 ad.

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Ralph: I noticed that last ad was from the old Family Herald. They were a Montreal, QC farm paper that we used to get when I was a kid back in the Lower Ottawa Valley. My father wrote a couple of articles for them about getting rid of coyotes and wolves in our area. They were enough of a problem that several farmers formed a hunting team to flush them out and kill them. I remember dad and my uncle on these hunting expeditions on the local farms around us. There was just enough bush cover for the wolves to hide in.

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Ralph: I noticed that last ad was from the old Family Herald. They were a Montreal, QC farm paper that we used to get when I was a kid back in the Lower Ottawa Valley. My father wrote a couple of articles for them about getting rid of coyotes and wolves in our area. They were enough of a problem that several farmers formed a hunting team to flush them out and kill them. I remember dad and my uncle on these hunting expeditions on the local farms around us. There was just enough bush cover for the wolves to hide in.

George, the Family Herald was probably one of the old stand by farm publications out this way from day one right up until they quit printing it (early seventies?). They had a good variety of articles, fiction, a few cartoons, ads. I've got a few old ones saved up and accumulated over the years. They did not have quite as many machinery ads as the Country Guide but the odd good one does turn up. I wonder if I have the one with your dad's articles about wolves? I recall a story like that in an old Country Guide from the fifties.

This Massey Ferguson ad is from a 1958 Family Herald.

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What a neat Massey Ad !!! thanks for posting

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If I remember correctly,the wolf articles were in either 1956 or 1957. That is when we had a predator problem with the sheep and it led to us getting rid of them in 1958 or 1959. He also wrote a similar article for Outdoor Life around the same time.

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If I remember correctly,the wolf articles were in either 1956 or 1957. That is when we had a predator problem with the sheep and it led to us getting rid of them in 1958 or 1959. He also wrote a similar article for Outdoor Life around the same time.

I'll be watching for the article George. And Kevin, Massey Ferguson used to go all out advertising back then. They often had a four page spread and that is what this one was in the 1958 Family Herald. I showed the "centrefold" already so here is the final page showing the various attachments for the 65 tractor.

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Ralph,

I to enjoyed the 1958 International Harvester ad; and the two Massey - Ferguson ads as well.

I have this tin sign I've had for decades showing the Model 8 Remington semi-automatic rifle and the guy is keeping the wolves at bay, around his camp fire. My dad had a Model 8 in .25 Remington when I was a tiny, tiny little boy. I remember him taking it, with Booblie Tresch, and Charley Yaeger. They'd guard the REA electrical sub-station near Glengarry during WWII in case of "enemy infiltration". They never fired a shot and mostly played cards, but the electricity was important in that area, since they got it in 1938.

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I love this ad. My mom, nor my wife... and probably neither grandmother ever came to the field like this lady in a red dress and high heels, of this Minneapolis - Moline Universal ad! I'm wondering if she's trying to "disrupt" his farming? :ph34r: Gary ;)

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I have this tin sign I've had for decades showing the Model 8 Remington semi-automatic rifle and the guy is keeping the wolves at bay, around his camp fire.

I love this ad. My mom, nor my wife... and probably neither grandmother ever came to the field like this lady in a red dress and high heels, of this Minneapolis - Moline Universal ad! I'm wondering if she's trying to "disrupt" his farming? :ph34r: Gary ;)

Gary, nice art work in both those ads. Some of these ads catch my interest more for the color and art than the subject itself. I guess I'd stop my Minneapolis for the pretty girl in the red dress . :D

Those advertisers do know how to catch our attention. This lady running the Gardenall tiller from 1949 probably drew some interest to the name at the time.

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Great M-M Universal advertisment Professor------------------in reading your comments; I thought she was stopping a Moline Universal model D------------------shows how far behind my mind really is.

Could be-------------------that's what stopped mine dead in it's tracks!!!!!! (red dresses have been the downfall of many a good man) :ph34r:;):D

Here is a Moline Plow Company ad for the Moline Universal model D-----------am sure I have posted it before.

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Delta Dirt

Avon, Ms 38723

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This fella better keep his mind on work if any pretty girls in red dresses show up he might get left behind :)

Just wondering has anybody heard tell of somebody somehow getting left behind while doing the 1 man plowing operation ??

1913 Twin City Ad

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This fella better keep his mind on work if any pretty girls in red dresses show up he might get left behind :)

Just wondering has anybody heard tell of somebody somehow getting left behind while doing the 1 man plowing operation ??

1913 Twin City Ad

Had to smile at the thought of that driver running back to flip the levers up on that end wheel drill and then rush back to the tractor. Oh yes, lift those plow levers too. Might be ok if the field was a few miles long.

I think this 1937 Twin City MM tractor and drill would be a lot more manageable for one man.

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Here's a 1922 picture of a Twin City fleet plowing at a cannery field along with a story

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And a 1922 IHC ad with some plowing going on also

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Ralph,

The boys have posted some nice ads today. Now I like Anson's Universal ad, but if he were running that new M&M Universal, and had that red dress, high heel shoe lady come to the field, I doubt there'd be much plowing accomplished?

Here's a paper poster of the Model 8 Remington "autoloader." From the size of that bear's head, I hope he has the 35 Remington caliber?

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Kevin,

I love those Twin City tractors, especially the big 40-65! I took a couple pictures of big Twin City tractors at Rollag in 2005. The first was the 4-cylinder 40-65 gas tractor like on your poster, and the larger yet, 6-cylinder 60-90 gas tractor. Gary ;)

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Re: Remington autoloader and bear poster

Got a friend who was telling our "resident expert gun smith" how much the friend liked his little .32 revolver for personal protection.

The gun smith told him that he should be carrying a jar of mayonaise along with him.

Friend asked what's the mayonaise for???

Dead pan reply was: good chance somebody's gonna make you eat that little a$$ pistol!!!!

From the size of that bear-----he may be thinking the rifle is a tooth pick.

DD

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