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scott in wa.

1956 S-170 (balast resistor)

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New coil.

very litle spark at coil wire. orange and very small.

6 cylinder, 12volt system.

new coil.

How about somthing call a balast resistor????

what is it ?

where is it?

could this be it??

thanks

much

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scott

Used to lower the 12v to prevent overvoltage at the points. Is a resistance wire in a porcelain holder either on the coil or firewall. Follow the coil wire back and you should find it. There were replacement coils made that ran on 12v eliminating the resistor.

mike

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Ballast resistor is a short piece of resistance wire or a small, usually rectangular shaped component, which is situated just before the ignition coil at the primary (+) terminal of coil.

The ballast resistor is essentially a current-compensating device made of special alloy wire. The compensating action is obtained because at low engine RPM the current flows for longer periods of time. This heats the resistor, causing less current to flow to the coil primary and improves (breaker) point life. At higher engine RPM the current flows at shorter periods of time, which lets the resistor cool and allows higher current to flow to the coil primary to produce maximum spark plug voltage.

While the engine is being turned by the starter, battery voltage is fed directly to the coil, bypassing the ballast resistor. This allows for a "hotter" starting spark.

Once the the engine starts and the starter is disengaged, the battery voltage is fed through the ballast resistor.

You can test a ballast resistor (not all vehicles even have one) by disconnecting it from the battery and using a very sensitive ohmmeter to check the resistance. It will be very low (in the case of this Case tractor manual I have open before me, it is .410 to .520 ohms, so you need a very accurate digital ohmmeter to read such a low value). Obviously, if you find a very high resistance, then your ballast resistor needs to be replaced.

Also, the fact that you have a new ignition coil doesn't necessarily mean that it's a good one (some new parts have manufacturing defects). You can check the coil primary and secondary resistance with an ohmmeter too.

If you don't know how to do this, let me know and I'll tell you.

First of all, though, make sure that 12 volts is even getting to the coil by using a DC voltmeter and testing for battery voltage at that point.

Boa sorte

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Yes that would be nice if you could tell me how to check the coil.

I have a fluke meter..

thanks

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Yes that would be nice if you could tell me how to check the coil.

I have a fluke meter..

thanks

OK..I assume that your coil is of the cylindrical type with a tower sticking up out of the center and a thick cable running from that tower to the center of the distributor cap, and with two small terminals on top of coil, one marked (+) the other marked (-). The two small terminals are the coil primary circuit, the tower is the secondary circuit (the purpose of the coil is to step up the 12V that enters the (+) terminal to the 20,000 V that exits the secondary terminal

Disconnect both small wires from the (+) and (-) terminals before beginning in order to ensure that no power is getting to the components under test. You sure wouldn't want to burn up a Fluke!!

I. To test coil primary resistance - Set DMM on ohms function, hold one prod to the (+) terminal of coil, other prod to (-) terminal. Should read very low ohms, around 1.0 ohm w/ a resistor or around 4.0 ohms without a resistor. If you have a service manual for your truck, go by what it says for the resistance values.

II. To test secondary resistance, remove thick cable from coil tower and insert one prod of the DMM into the top tower, hold other prod to the (-) terminal of the coil. The resistance reading should be relatively high, around 4K to 13K ohms. Again, if your truck's service manual gives a different value for this resistance, go by it.

If the resistance is too low (less than 4K) the coil probably has shorted secondary turns. If it is too high (40K or more) the secondary winding is either open, there is a bad connection at the coil terminal or resistance is high in the cable.

You can also use a 110V test lamp to make the following tests:

1. Connect the test prods of the 110V test lamp to both primary terminals of the coil. If test lamp does not light, the primary circuit is open

2. Apply one test prod of the test lamp to the tower terminal and the other test prod to one of the primary terminals. If the secondary circuit is not open, the lamp will not light but tiny sparks will appear at the test points when they are rubbed over the terminals. If secondary circuit is open, no sparks will occur.

3. Apply one test prod of test lamp to coil case and touch the other prod to the primary and high tension (tower) terminals. If the lamp lights, or if tiny sparks appear at point of contact, the coil windings are grounded.

A coil with open or grounded windings must be replaced. It is unnecessary to test such a coil with a coil test instrument.

After you have tested the coil, and reconnected the wires/cable, make sure that all the connections between the coil and distributor are clean and tight, and that the spark plug cables are clean and tight and in good condition.

Check battery standing voltage with your Fluke at the battery (+) and (-) posts. A fully charged 12V battery will read 12.66V.

Again..boa sorte

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Yes that would be nice if you could tell me how to check the coil.

I have a fluke meter..

thanks

WEK meb'be might'a added re>>You can test a ballast resistor (not all vehicles even have one) by disconnecting it<< that, since it is firing when you have the starter engaged, but if it quits as soon as you cease the starter, then the ballast resistor is not working.

WEK, can you 'splain this better here, I figured this out on my split-window once.

best, randy

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The part in WEK`s post explains the by-passing of the ballast resistor for starting. This was done with an extra contact in the starter solenoid. If the ballast resistor is open then the engine quits as soon as the starter disengages.

mike

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Scott, old chap, sometimes we get caught up in the moment and forget to mention something and it only comes to us after the fact.

What I forgot to mention was that you should pull the thick cable up out of the center tower of the distributor, hold it with a wooden clothespin about 1/4" away from engine block, and have someone operate starter. Observe the spark; if it is strong and blue, then the trouble is not in your coil, it would be in your distributor or spark plug wires.

Since your truck is so old, I would immediately replace the breaker points, condenser, spark plug cables and spark plugs as a matter of course.

Also, you did not say whether your truck had a negative-ground or positive-ground electrical system (no, not all 12V systems are negative ground). If you have a positive-ground system you must attach the wire leading from the battery/ignition switch to the (-) terminal of coil instead of the (+) terminal and the little wire running from the coil to distributor must be attached to the (+) terminal of the coil instead of the (-) terminal.

If you attend to all these things and carefully adjust the ignition timing after you install the new breaker points and condenser, I think your truck will run very good (at least with regard to the ignition system! hopefully you won't encounter any problems with the induction or fuel systems).

Also, hopefully your truck hasn't been upgraded to an electronic ignition system!

Boa sorte and keep us posted on the outcome.

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Thanks that did the trick,

Its running now but its backfiring through the carb.

I eye balled the point gap and think its to big now.

I hope once I set them at about .015 it will stop.

what do you think??

Soon as I touch the gas if does this.

Coil was good.......

Thanks much

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Scott, according to my references, your S-170 should have the Super Black Diamond 282 cid.

If it does, my other reference gives the following tuneup specs for that engine as:

Firing order 1-5-3-6-2-4

Point gap .017"

Dwell 32 deg.

Spark occurs 6 deg BTDC

Timing mark located on crankshaft pulley

Spark plug gap ,030"

Cylinder compression 125 psi

Valve tappet clearance (hot) .021" intake & exhaust

As to the spitback through the carburetor, that could be caused by too many factors for me to type in here. So I will scan the troubleshooting chart from one of my manuals and you can keep checking items listed there until you locate the source of your problem.

I should be back in a moment with the scanned page

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Scott, old chap, here's your diagnostic chart. Use it in good health

Boa sorte

post-9-1118433812.jpg

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Hey Scott you should replace the points AND condensor because

they can mess up your spark and can't be fully tested easily.

It's better to just replace them with new ones.

Check the distibutor out fully too. make sure the bearings or bushing arn't letting the shaft wobble around and the advance

mechanism should work freely and spring back the cam lobe

quickly. Also inspect the point wire stud and insulating washers

for cracks and corrosion. Clean and inspect the cap for cracks.

Make sure the distibutor is grounded and clamped down.

The wire from the points to the dist. term can wear out and crack

too. Spitting back when revved can be from late timing.

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Thanks,

I will use all the info you give me.

Iam going up tonight to look at it.

I hope I can drive it home tomorrow.

So what your saying is that it may not be the large gap? correct?

.017, is way smaller than .035

thanks

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Thanks,

I will use all the info you give me.

Iam going up tonight to look at it.

I hope I can drive it home tomorrow.

So what your saying is that it may not be the large gap? correct?

.017, is way smaller than .035

thanks

Usually the problem you mention is with too lean a fuel mixture or the distributor advance not advancing the spark properly. As JunkDude says, be sure to check out all the components of your distributor, especially the

little ball bearings that the breaker plate revolves on. Also the breaker arm spring tension should be checked to be sure it is not weak. This requires a special low-reading spring scale. If you have also a vacuum advance, you can test whether it is working by aiming a timing light at the crankshaft pulley while engine is running and disconnect the hose from the vacuum advance unit on distributor. The timing mark should change when you do this.

Unless I'm mistaken I told you to replace both the breaker points and the condenser as a set. Since that is the procedure I myself use, I'm sure I wouldn't advise someone else to replace one without replacing the other at the same time.

Make sure the faces of the breaker points are perfectly aligned; they must be perfectly flat against each other when closed.

Yes, .035" is a much wider gap than .017" You will have to use a feeler gauge to set the gap; eyeballing it is not accurate enough. And using a dwell meter is even more accurate

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Thanks for all the great information, I used it and it worked.

The old girl runs now, But Iam having some carb problems.

It’s a single barrel carb (Holly)

It wants to run with the choke on, does anybody have an Idea what is wrong with it???

I bought a rebuild kit for it bout have yet to put it in. took the carb apart last night.

Ordered master cylinder kit for it also, brakes work but have to pump them up. After about a minute they go to the floor again.

Iam getting there, maybe another week or so.

If you have any Ideas on the carb please let me know.

Tried to get a rebuilt on but couldn't find it.

I had the numbers to the carb but can't find them.

thanks

Scott

:)

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Thanks for all the great information, I used it and it worked.

The old girl runs now,  But Iam having some carb problems.

It’s a single barrel carb (Holly)

It wants to run with the choke on, does anybody have an Idea what is wrong with it???

I bought a rebuild kit for it bout have yet to put it in. took the carb apart last night.

Ordered master cylinder kit for it also, brakes work but have to pump them up. After about a minute they go to the floor again.

Iam getting there, maybe another week or so.

If you have any Ideas on the carb please let me know.

Tried to get a rebuilt on but couldn't find it.

I had the numbers to the carb but can't find them.

thanks

Scott

:)

Scott, although it's kinda expensive, you need to buy yourself an official International service manual for your truck. If you do, I strongly advise you to buy it from Binder Books (at www.binderbooks.com). I just now checked and they have them for your truck. It is:

International "S" Line 1956-57 Service Manual #CTS-2000

794 pages, $71.95

It will tell you exactly what you need to do; the precise settings for the carburetor, ignition system, cooling system, everything. Well worth the money. (In fact the first thing I do anytime I buy a vehicle is buy the service manual for it right away).

I do not have a manual for any International truck so I cannot advise you as to the adjustments to be made on your carburetor.

If it only runs with the choke ON, however, it would indicate that, as I pointed out in the previous post, it is running with too lean an A/F mixture, since the purpose of the choke is to enrich (put more fuel) into the air/fuel mixture for starting. As the engine warms up you should be able to gradually push the choke in (I don't know if you have an automatic choke on your truck or a manual one).

So, you really do need that manual so you would be getting the answers to your questions straight from the horse's mouth and with specifics, as opposed to generalities as we have been offering you,

Boa sorte

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Yep thanks again.

I will buy a manual for it...

Does anybody know where I could get a rebuilt carb for this old girl???

thanks

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Hey Scott before tearing into the carb try this old trick.

With the motor running rev it up and smother the carb with

a big rag until the motor almost stops then remove the rag

keep the throttle open and repeat several times. Sometimes

the high suction can clear the clogged up jets.

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I did that with my hand yesterday.

Just about sucked may arm in there, but still no luck.

I bought a rebuild kit for it, tore it apart last night, soaked it for a couple hours, rinsed it and blew it out with compressed air, today Iam going to see if I can snake some small wire through those holes.

But some are very very tiny.

It would be allot easier if I could find a working unit.

Have any ideas??

Thanks

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Scott, you'll just have to do a Google search for Holley carburetors and/or Holley rebuilt carburetors.

You're bound to find something there

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WEK,

Just curious why you use the (f) of "good luck" (boa sorte) instead of the masculine (bom sorte). :-)

But then again my Portuguese is pretty rusty.

It's all coming back now........luck (sorte) is a (f) verb.

answered my own question. I have get out more. LOL

Tchau,

Mike

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To keep this on Topic, di, you guys know that IH built trucks in Brazil just ourside of Sao Paulo.

Mike

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FV-265,

Sim, "sorte" é um substantivo feminino.

Você é brasileiro?

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FV-265,

Sim, "sorte" é um substantivo feminino.

Você é brasileiro?

Negativo - para un poquito Espanol.

best, randy

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Sim, "sorte" é um substantivo feminino.

Você é brasileiro?

Negativo - para un poquito Espanol.

best, randy

Sí, ya sé que hablas español, Randy, so lobo de mar :o:):D:lol:

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