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coolant filter


Ihred62

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I have a 3588 2+2 and a 1086 put about 75 hours a year on them I change coolant every 6 years and coolant filter every 3 years. What do you think? Every thing keeps getting more $$$$$ wondering if I could do it less often.

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We change coolant filters every year. Holed liners aren't cheap. Now, if you want, you can get the antifreeze test strips, and adjust your antifreeze additive levels with them. That's probably the best way, anyhow.

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I say a filter is cheaper than having to tear down an engine because of a cavitated sleeve. Some of the filters used to have a coolant treatment pellet in them but a lot do not anymore. Some manufactures want you to treat the coolant with liquid conditioner. I would just do as the manual says.

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I say a filter is cheaper than having to tear down an engine because of a cavitated sleeve. Some of the filters used to have a coolant treatment pellet in them but a lot do not anymore. Some manufactures want you to treat the coolant with liquid conditioner. I would just do as the manual says.

I use CASE IH filters which I thought had additives in the filter so did not think I would have to add more. How often do you guys change coolant? Do you go by hours or years. Heard about test strips but never used them. Where do get them?

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I am not sure about your filters. I used to be able to shake the filter and feel the pellet in it. I work for a Deere dealer and they used to have them as an option on some of their engines A couple of years ago they quit putting the pellet in the filter and now want people to go with the liquid conditioner in all machines as needed or specified. We have the test strips out front in the showroom. The parts guys get them through Deere. I bet that Napa or another retailer would have them as well. They are a really accurate way to see what kind of shape the coolant is in. Just don't put on a filter that has a pellet in it and add conditioner. You can use too much. There is a fine line. As far as changing coolant do what the manual recommends. Of course I have seen coolant that looked like pond water also. I think changing coolant is a good way to keep the internal parts of the block and radiator clean.

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I change coolant filter on the 7130 every spring before seeding. On the combine every fall at the start of harvest. Fleetguard filters and as I recall they have something rattling around inside them.

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I agree with yearly on the filter and 1,000 hours on the coolant. Besides right now even CIH coolant filters at your local dealer shouldn't be much over $10, I just priced mine out to pick up tomorrow and it was just under $11. Messicks has them listed at like $10.09. That is pretty dang cheap in my book. On a side note seems strange this year that all my filters (yes ALL) are cheaper directly from the dealer by a fairly significant amount vs. N.A.P.A. or Carquest or the likes. Has anyone else ran across this yet? I found it pretty shocking that OEM is cheaper right now.

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Anybody that owns a Powerstroke should be fussy about cooling system maintenance. I've used the Fleet-Gard test strips for years. The test strips have to match the coolant additive your using. Ford's additive is Fleet-Gard's DC-4A. I check the concentration every oil change. Lot of debate always on PSD forums about what level to shoot for, I always tried for 2.2 to 2.5 on a 3.0 scale I think it was. The instructions on the bottle of 50 or 100 strips was pretty clear, just match the strip's patches to the colors on the back of the bottle.

I bought a strip or two from my C/IH dealer, $1 each, but a bottle at my Ford store was about $30 for fifty strips. The bottles of strips are dated, and should be used up by that date.

I like the idea of the coolant filter, especially on new engines where the castings still have loose foundry sand that can circulate with the coolant. But I much prefer the test strips for checking the additive. The method Ford showed in the PSD manual about maintaining the cooling system was/is a JOKE. But at least they mentioned the additive, which didn't happen in the 6.9 & 7.3 IDI engines, which is partly to blame for so many of them cavitating.

I agree with the annual coolant filter replacement & 1000 hrs on coolant flush & refill, but I would still test additive strength with the strips. On a wet liner engine like the IH 400-series, in a tractor only used 75-100 hours a year I really don't think I'd go over a couple years on coolant changes. Cooling system corrosion is more a factor of time as opposed to hours of use.

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I have been seeing several guys adding a coolant filter to thier late model diesel trucks. They say you wouldnt believe the crap thats in the filter when you cut it open. They are adding them into the heater hose routing.

J

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I have been seeing several guys adding a coolant filter to thier late model diesel trucks. They say you wouldnt believe the crap thats in the filter when you cut it open. They are adding them into the heater hose routing.

J

I've read a lot of those posts too. Think I have the IH part number list for the T444E pkg in the shop.

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Great topic. My 986 gets very light work - maybe 20 hrs a year. A coolant filter is cheap (currently has Fleet Guard) and easy to replace, let alone a test strip.

I'll throw the question out there - What's the opinion on oil & filter changes for such a light use tractor, as well as the fuel filters??

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Great topic. My 986 gets very light work - maybe 20 hrs a year. A coolant filter is cheap (currently has Fleet Guard) and easy to replace, let alone a test strip.

I'll throw the question out there - What's the opinion on oil & filter changes for such a light use tractor, as well as the fuel filters??

Is the tractor stored in a heated shop or in the cold? If in the cold I would change the oil & oil filter annually because of condensation. If in a heated shop I would be more inclined to change it at the recomended interval. In either case I would take an oil sample annually

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From what I know about coolant filters is all they are for is treating the anti-freeze with the coolant conditioner. The filter part is misleading as they don't filter a darn thing. Just run the coolant through to disolve the conditioner pellets. Someone correct me if I am wrong but a filter is no different than dumping in the liquid conditioner as far as I know.

You can change them too often. Be careful and check your anti-freeze with the strips to see where your levels are. If you get too much of the conditioner in there you can cause the silicates in the anti-freeze to separate and settle to the bottom of the block and radiator. It can cause some pretty serious issues, so use the strips and you maybe able to save some money on coolant filters and engine work.

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CIH offers two filters..a pre-charge filter that is the equivalent to 12 units of DCA 4 and a service filter that is equivalent to 4 units of DCA 4.

Using test strips is the only accurate way to service your cooling system and maintain the additive protection at the proper levels.

I find a lot of units under protected with DCA 4 and with the freeze level at -60F (or lower) when, in anyplace but the Northern areas where lower temperatures are encountered, is counterproductive. Proper procedure is to correct the freeze level to -34F (50/50) and then correct the DCA 4 levels according to the test strips. There is a work sheet available to calculate the amount of additive to use to bring the levels within range.

I also have a work sheet to calculate the amount of old coolant to drain and of water or anti freeze to add to bring the freeze level to optimum. A refractometer must be used for the freeze level readings, little floating balls and discs or swinging needles are not accurate enough to get the proper reading.

Jim N.

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Maynard,

We have been using the Compleatt "premix" for the last several years. SOP is to change the antifreeze every other year & check with the test strips annually. Engine hours will vary fron 300 - 1,000 duuring the 2 yr period depending upon the machine. Any thoughts or suggestions? Can we golonger than the two years on the lower houred machines?

TIA,

boog

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Maynard,

We have been using the Compleatt "premix" for the last several years. SOP is to change the antifreeze every other year & check with the test strips annually. Engine hours will vary fron 300 - 1,000 duuring the 2 yr period depending upon the machine. Any thoughts or suggestions? Can we golonger than the two years on the lower houred machines?

TIA,

boog

Probably could extend a year on the low houred machines without harm as long as the additives are kept up to snuff. You have a better program than most, I wish I could get everybody close to your standard Byron. I like the pre-mix because of the de-ionized and chemically correct water used for the dilution. Not to mention not having to mess with dilution, just pour it in.

Jim N.

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Probably could extend a year on the low houred machines without harm as long as the additives are kept up to snuff. You have a better program than most, I wish I could get everybody close to your standard Byron. I like the pre-mix because of the de-ionized and chemically correct water used for the dilution. Not to mention not having to mess with dilution, just pour it in.

Jim N.

What's your thoughts on using "Distilled Water" when flushing & refilling cooling systems? I know the PSD forums used to debate Distilled vs De-ionized water a LOT.

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Not to mention not having to mess with dilution, just pour it in.

Jim N.

That's was one of the deciding factors when we went to the premix. When we pick up a jug of antifreeze there is no worry as to what the mix ratio is, or even if it has been mixed. I find the older I get the simplier things are the better it is :D

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Another tip....when you change the water filter, be sure to re-open the valves. Have a 986 tri-stripe getting an inframe right now because (partially) of this. If the water can't circulate the filter is kinda useless.... :wacko:

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Probably could extend a year on the low houred machines without harm as long as the additives are kept up to snuff. You have a better program than most, I wish I could get everybody close to your standard Byron. I like the pre-mix because of the de-ionized and chemically correct water used for the dilution. Not to mention not having to mess with dilution, just pour it in.

Jim N.

What's your thoughts on using "Distilled Water" when flushing & refilling cooling systems? I know the PSD forums used to debate Distilled vs De-ionized water a LOT.

Distilled is 'cleaner', but deionized is still pretty 'clean', and a heck of a lot better than tap water!

As for the filters, follow the engine mfgr's reccomendations, and test the coolant with the strips prior to changing the filter (if using the pre-charged filters). It is not always necessary to use a pre-charge filter, but it is a good idea to change the filter. Yes, they have filtration media in them (at least the ones I use do) and they DO catch stuff in that media.

Anymore, I don't use pre-charged filters, but test with strips, add coolant conditioner as necessary, and change the filter (non-pre-charged) at the mfgr's rec interval.

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