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brian falcone

cdl for an antique???

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was talking to the concrete form guy today while waiting for trailer dumps and he told me hes selling his 60s international r-200 flatbed. while this thing needs a bit of work,,it runs good and its fairly solid. it has a straight 6 gas engine and a 17 foot bed with air brakes. while i normally pay no mind to these sort of things i was thinking that this would be cool to haul the t-340 to the hcea show this coming fall .the show is a few towns over . not too far . if i register it as an antique and put "not for hire" decals on the door,do i still need a cdl license to legally drive this truck? it wouldnt be used for commercial work. its the air brakes that has me questioning it. i dont have the cdl for heavy trucks....but my father doesnt need one for his rv and that has air brakes too. hate to get bagged and have it towed. just looking for info before i start thinking too much....worse case i could just buy it and park it out back, the wife would love that! brian

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Your best bet is to contact your local carrier enforcement office, or state patrol headquarters. They will be able to tell you exactly what you will or will not need, course there is at least one person on this forum that will probably be able to shed some legal light on the subject too.

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I agree, go have a friendly visit with your local DOT officer BEFORE you get pulled over. He can answer your "what if I do run this truck" questions. I bought my 87 Ford and trailer to haul my dozer and loader as a private individual. The answers he didn't know, he called his supervisor. We went thru the "Truckers Handbook" that is published by the MI State Police Motor Carrier Division and the MI Trucking Association. Good news, as an individual I only had to have a CDL, no medical card, no DOT number, no fuel permit, no name on the truck. Bad news, I'd get pulled over at the weigh station for not having all this stuff and I'd risk having my truck impounded by ignorant local cops. His suggestion, get the stuff, doesn't cost anything to do so.

If it's a straight truck, plated for less than 26,000 lbs, no CDL required. RV's are exempt, that's another story.

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It all sort of depends on how $$$ hungry your local enforcement patrol may be.

As it was noted earlier, if the truck has a GVWR of less than 26,000# and it is licensed for less than 26,000# you shouldn't have any problems. But that doesn't mean you won't have problems.

The fact the truck has air brakes may be your biggest stumbling block.

It just may be easier to get your CDL and not worry about it.

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It all sort of depends on how $$$ hungry your local enforcement patrol may be.

As it was noted earlier, if the truck has a GVWR of less than 26,000# and it is licensed for less than 26,000# you shouldn't have any problems. But that doesn't mean you won't have problems.

The fact the truck has air brakes may be your biggest stumbling block.

It just may be easier to get your CDL and not worry about it.

I am not sure that air brakes are an issue. I have rented several trucks at hertz over the years in the under 26K class. Some had air brakes.

None of the drivers were CDL level qualified.

BUT this is in Texas!

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It all sort of depends on how $$$ hungry your local enforcement patrol may be.

As it was noted earlier, if the truck has a GVWR of less than 26,000# and it is licensed for less than 26,000# you shouldn't have any problems. But that doesn't mean you won't have problems.

The fact the truck has air brakes may be your biggest stumbling block.

It just may be easier to get your CDL and not worry about it.

I am not sure that air brakes are an issue. I have rented several trucks at hertz over the years in the under 26K class. Some had air brakes.

None of the drivers were CDL level qualified.

BUT this is in Texas!

It really depends upon the state you live in, it is a "gray area" for the most part. Some states are if the vehicle has air brakes then you must have a CDL does not matter if you under 26001 or not. Others are historical plates non commerical vehicle don't care if you have air brakes or not. In the long run you are better off getting the CDL, it helps to eliminate sitting at the side of the road trying to explain the law to "Barney Fife"

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non cdl but need an air brake endorsment

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non cdl but need an air brake endorsment

You are wrong on not needing a CDL.

It will all depend on were you travel, How far, what you are hauling, and what state you are operating in. You need to talk to each State you want to travel in. Be honest on what you want to do. Some states feel that if you are hauling a car/tractor to a show you are being compensated for your time and you will need a CDL. Some states fell if you need air brakes you need CDL, also the 10,000 pound ruling can make you get a CDL. Also it is not What you license the truck for, IT IS WHAT the GVW is that will determine if you need a CDL.

Just go get a CDL and be done with it, then you do have to worry and get a ticket.

I do not know why some people are so set on not getting a CDL and will do anything to try to bet the system out of do it right.

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You are wrong on not needing a CDL.

It will all depend on were you travel, How far, what you are hauling, and what state you are operating in. You need to talk to each State you want to travel in. Be honest on what you want to do. Some states feel that if you are hauling a car/tractor to a show you are being compensated for your time and you will need a CDL. Some states fell if you need air brakes you need CDL, also the 10,000 pound ruling can make you get a CDL. Also it is not What you license the truck for, IT IS WHAT the GVW is that will determine if you need a CDL.

Just go get a CDL and be done with it, then you do have to worry and get a ticket.

I do not know why some people are so set on not getting a CDL and will do anything to try to bet the system out of do

Antique vehicles and the big motor coach style motor homes and other vehicles that have air brakes in ILL you still need a air brake endorsment on your license even though you do not need a CDL to operate said vehicles .there is a lot of commerical vehicles under the 26,000 lb rule that have air brakes .

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You are wrong on not needing a CDL.

It will all depend on were you travel, How far, what you are hauling, and what state you are operating in. You need to talk to each State you want to travel in. Be honest on what you want to do. Some states feel that if you are hauling a car/tractor to a show you are being compensated for your time and you will need a CDL. Some states say if you need air brakes you need CDL, also the 10,000 pound ruling can make you get a CDL. Also it is not What you license the truck for, IT IS WHAT the GVW is that will determine if you need a CDL.

Just go get a CDL and be done with it, then you do have to worry and get a ticket.

I do not know why some people are so set on not getting a CDL and will do anything to try to bet the system out of do

Antique vehicles and the big motor coach style motor homes and other vehicles that have air brakes in ILL you still need a air brake endorsement on your license even though you do not need a CDL to operate said vehicles .there is a lot of commercial vehicles under the 26,000 lb rule that have air brakes .

The fed;s consider hauling a car or tractor to a show being compensated {you might get a reward] Most states don't enforce the rule but I know of several guys that got tickets because of the rule, one being a friend that was caught just south of Lincoln Ill. I had to go haul his pickup/trailer/show car home for him.

He is not driving a Motor Home. Motor homes operate on a different set or rules than commercial vehicles, The rich that can afford a motor home can get a way with anything. So you can not compair them to commercial vehicles.

I stated earlier that it will all depend on were you travel, how many miles you travel, what you are hauling, what states you travel in, what you can license the truck for and most importantly how the stopping officer determines the law. Call every state you might be traveling in BE HONEST in what you want to do get an officer name, badge number, date you talked to them in case something goes wrong. It's not all the officers fault that each one gives you a different answer. The Fed's set minim rules and then each state can add to that. Some rules are poorly written and just like on here each person See's the same thing differently. The biggest problem is the question people ask and the way they ask it.

Just because you fall under the 26000 pound rule does not mean you don't need a CDL there is still the 10000 pound rules along with a host of other rules.

It's like I said earlier why do people spend so much time getting around a CDL license??? Just go get it licensing the truck right an be done with it and don't worry about a fine or worse yet a law suite if you get into an accident. That is when you will find out Your insurance will not be any good for not being properly licensed.

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I am diabetic and can not get a CDL at all. What I have is a class A non CDL. I also carry the most recent FMCSA book with me and have 390.3f3 bookmarked. Here is a copy:

§390.3 General applicability.

(a) The rules in Subchapter B of this chapter are applicable to all employers, employees, and commercial motor vehicles, which transport property or passengers in interstate commerce.

(B) The rules in Part 383, Commercial Driver's License Standards; Requirements and Penalties, are applicable to every person who operates a commercial motor vehicle, as defined in §383.5 of this subchapter, in interstate or intrastate commerce and to all employers of such persons.

© The rules in Part 387, Minimum levels of financial responsibility for motor carriers, are applicable to motor carriers as provided in §§387.3 or §387.27 of this subchapter.

(d) Additional requirements. Nothing in Subchapter B of this chapter shall be construed to prohibit an employer from requiring and enforcing more stringent requirements relating to safety of operation and employee safety and health.

(e) Knowledge of and compliance with the regulations.

(e)(1) Every employer shall be knowledgeable of and comply with all regulations contained in this subchapter which are applicable to that motor carrier's operations.

(e)(2) Every driver and employee shall be instructed regarding, and shall comply with, all applicable regulations contained in this subchapter.

(e)(3) All motor vehicle equipment and accessories required by this subchapter shall be maintained in compliance with all applicable performance and design criteria set forth in this subchapter.

(f) Exceptions. Unless otherwise specifically provided, the rules in this subchapter do not apply to —

(f)(1) All school bus operations as defined in §390.5;

(f)(2) Transportation performed by the Federal government, a State, or any political subdivision of a State, or an agency established under a compact between States that has been approved by the Congress of the United States;

(f)(3) The occasional transportation of personal property by individuals not for compensation nor in the furtherance of a commercial enterprise;

Based on this entry: If I own the vehicle and its contents I am exempt.

The reason I carry the book is so I can show any officer that I didn't write it. Its right here in black and white.

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Being diabetic does not stop one from obtaining a CDL , you can apply for a wavier

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Being diabetic does not stop one from obtaining a CDL , you can apply for a wavier

True you can. However I have what they call BRITTLE diabetes. It has been hard for me to keep the BloodSugers down. Nothing I try works for very long. Anyway regardless of the diabetes the above ruling exempts you from needing to get the CDL. Providing you are not making ANY money from this. Cops here in Illinois are so PITA they will stop a pickup that is pulling a stock car. We had a guy here that had a sponsor sticker on his car and the pig parked him for no CDL. I look at it like this. They wrote the rules not me. How are they going to argue with that.

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atleast here in oregon you can do this, i got a farm endorsement i can haul 150 miles one way which is more than enough for anything we do around here. all i had to do was have my "employer' sign a sheet that said i know how to drive a truck

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I just went through a seminar here that our local Farm Bureau put on and I asked about hauling antique tractors to shows. The answer I recieved was as long as you are hauling your own equipment and NOT FOR HIRE you have to have the proper weighted tags on the vehicle but you don't have to have CDLs. Although the officer suggested I needed class A license incase "Barney Fife" was arround. (I already have CDLs) Eason

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Another thing someone may want to look at....I was talking to a guy on another forum who got a ticket. He was driving a truck with collector plates on it, pulling his collector tractor to a show. I don't remember the state but they don't allow collector plated vehicles to carry or pull a load.

Rick

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You should not have to check on every State if you are in compliance with your home State's regulations and have a copy of and a copy of the US. Constitution in your possession. This is due to the "full faith and credit" clause which says "Full Faith and Credit shall be given in each State to the public Acts, Records, and judicial Proceedings of every other State." (Article IV, Section 1.)

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Try that with your gun permit in the next state and with innumerable things legal in one state, but not the another.

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You should not have to check on every State if you are in compliance with your home State's regulations and have a copy of and a copy of the US. Constitution in your possession. This is due to the "full faith and credit" clause which says "Full Faith and Credit shall be given in each State to the public Acts, Records, and judicial Proceedings of every other State." (Article IV, Section 1.)

Thats why I carry the FMCSA rule book with me. It is always the most recent addition. Hard to argue with the ruleing when it is black and white. Granted it is smart to abide by all basic laws like weight to vehicle license, load control, lights are working and such. Basically dont give them a reason to write you up. Be courteous to the officer and you should be ok.

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Another thing someone may want to look at....I was talking to a guy on another forum who got a ticket. He was driving a truck with collector plates on it, pulling his collector tractor to a show. I don't remember the state but they don't allow collector plated vehicles to carry or pull a load.

Rick

In Michigan the regulations state

Historical and authentic license plates

Michigan has a long and proud history as the automotive center of the world. Many residents enjoy restoring and collecting vintage automobiles, trucks and motorcycles. Since 1956, the state has issued historic and authentic license plates for antique vehicles used in parades, fairs, car shows, swap meets and other events.

Historical vehicles

A historical vehicle must be:

* More than 25 years old

* Owned solely as a collector's item

* Used only for events such as historical club activities, parades and car show

Note: A vehicle registered with a historical plate cannot be used for routine transportation.

When I bought my 87 Ford to haul my 1950 TD-6, I had a discussion with the local Motor carrier officer about all this "stuff". My truck isn't 25 years old yet, but he said the big problem is "proving" that your meeting the requirements to Officer Fife in small town USA. Throw in not having a DOT number, Fuel permit, name on the side and Barney will impound the truck. The officer said you can prevail in court and get it all thrown out but it will cost you time and money to successfully fight it.

I can buy 3 month plates in MI @$100/ month for 54,000 lbs, (Don't want to play with the stuff in the winter anyways :rolleyes: ) so it's worth it to me to look like a commercial vehicle, keep my truck shiny and just roll on by Barney B)

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IL has antique plates so you would just need the air brake endorsement along with your regular class A or B license

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Another thing someone may want to look at....I was talking to a guy on another forum who got a ticket. He was driving a truck with collector plates on it, pulling his collector tractor to a show. I don't remember the state but they don't allow collector plated vehicles to carry or pull a load.

Rick

In Michigan the regulations state

Historical and authentic license plates

Michigan has a long and proud history as the automotive center of the world. Many residents enjoy restoring and collecting vintage automobiles, trucks and motorcycles. Since 1956, the state has issued historic and authentic license plates for antique vehicles used in parades, fairs, car shows, swap meets and other events.

Historical vehicles

A historical vehicle must be:

* More than 25 years old

* Owned solely as a collector's item

* Used only for events such as historical club activities, parades and car show

Note: A vehicle registered with a historical plate cannot be used for routine transportation.

When I bought my 87 Ford to haul my 1950 TD-6, I had a discussion with the local Motor carrier officer about all this "stuff". My truck isn't 25 years old yet, but he said the big problem is "proving" that your meeting the requirements to Officer Fife in small town USA. Throw in not having a DOT number, Fuel permit, name on the side and Barney will impound the truck. The officer said you can prevail in court and get it all thrown out but it will cost you time and money to successfully fight it.

I can buy 3 month plates in MI @$100/ month for 54,000 lbs, (Don't want to play with the stuff in the winter anyways :rolleyes: ) so it's worth it to me to look like a commercial vehicle, keep my truck shiny and just roll on by Barney B)

What is commerical insurance going to cost you? Most guys have "NOT FOR HIRE" painted on the truck and a some even carry some sort of flyer for the show they are going to. Just my 2 cents

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What is commerical insurance going to cost you? Most guys have "NOT FOR HIRE" painted on the truck and a some even carry some sort of flyer for the show they are going to. Just my 2 cents

I have "Not for Hire" on my tractor as well on the advice of the Motor Carrier. Insurance on it as a "privately owned not for hire" rig runs about $90 / month. It's only insured while it's plated and on the road. While it looks pretty nice, it's not a show class truck yet.

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ok this is what i have learned and i live in indiana this was a few years back i was 19 i was drivin down the road in my single axle dump truck with hydralic brakes pullin a trailer with electric brakes Barney Phife pulled me over did am inspection ok everything passed i donno how lol but i had the truck plated for 23000 and the trailer at 7000 ok well needless to say he got me for combo right off the get go .......he told me i was legal drivin the truck with air brakes or hydralic brakes up to 26000 gvw but no trailer other than that he said i was good to go ........to make a long story short i paid my 75 dollars and spent 2 days of free time takin test and a driving test to get a class A cdl and i still have them today it was one of the best things i have went and done best 75 dollars and 2 days at the dmv i ever did and i don't drive truck for a living i usually haul my own equipment with no worries other than passin a road side inspection

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Oh yea i also have air brake endorsment and tanker and you have to take a d.o.t phisical every 2 years which ain't bad

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