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Why do you remove the driveshaft when towing


Dax DeCelle

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The reason given in Hot Rod Magazine back when you could put a town bar on your race car and drag it to the race was this.

In neutral with the vehicle moving but the engine not running the output shaft turns because it is connected to the rear end. The input shaft does not turn and the countershaft is geared direct to the input shaft so it does not turn as well. When the countershaft spins it throws oil around so everything gets lubricated. Under a long tow the output shaft bearings do not get lubricated and will eventually fail.

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My Dad and I once towed a 74 dodge one ton 10 miles to have the timing chain and gears replaced .Obviously a non runner ,but only 10 miles. That destroyed the syncros in the transmission! No oil getting to that area apparently was rather unfriendly to the tranny!

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Did anyone see the show where a large wrecker company towed an antique 2 ton firetruck and pulled the axle shafts out of the differential and stuffed styrofoam coffee cups butt first to stop any gearlube from leaking out? I thought this way has to be wrong!!!!!!!!!!! how can gearlube be thrown around inside to the diff. with those shafts out to lube those outboard wheel bearings!!!!!!

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Did anyone see the show where a large wrecker company towed an antique 2 ton firetruck and pulled the axle shafts out of the differential and stuffed styrofoam coffee cups butt first to stop any gearlube from leaking out? I thought this way has to be wrong!!!!!!!!!!! how can gearlube be thrown around inside to the diff. with those shafts out to lube those outboard wheel bearings!!!!!!

Remember Ohare's boys are professionals :wacko: ,but when piggy backing new trucks they do the same thing , now I know why the old timers always packed there bearings for that very reason .

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I had a fairly new 9900 International truck with an 18speed transmission. Several years ago I made a "bubu" and needed about a 5 mile tow. The tow truck driver lifted the front end and told me to put the transmission in high gear and low range and hold the clutch in. I still don't know his reasoning, but everything turned out okay.

DWF

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Did anyone see the show where a large wrecker company towed an antique 2 ton firetruck and pulled the axle shafts out of the differential and stuffed styrofoam coffee cups butt first to stop any gearlube from leaking out? I thought this way has to be wrong!!!!!!!!!!! how can gearlube be thrown around inside to the diff. with those shafts out to lube those outboard wheel bearings!!!!!!

Remember Ohare's boys are professionals :wacko: ,but when piggy backing new trucks they do the same thing , now I know why the old timers always packed there bearings for that very reason .

There is oil in the hubs already (so it doesn't need to be slung from the diff), but when you pull the shafts, that oil comes drooling out.

The proper way to do this is to have a set of plates on hand that have a filler hole in them, remove the shaft, install the plate, then pour some oil into the filler hole and install the plug.

When you do this, it's no different than a steer axle hub, with oil in the hub cavity well.

I operated wreckers at one time for my daily bread, and have learned that just because a guy has a clipboard, a reflective vest and a tow truck doesn't automatically mean he knows what he's doing.

Had one guy want to use a tow-bar style hitch to hook up to one of my KW T600's with a plastic bumper.

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On automatic-equipped cars, the tranny's fluid pump is turned by the engine, so when the engine isn't running there's no lube to the output shaft bushing; so the tailshaft will eventually wear-out the bushing.

I think 1962 was the last year that MOPARs had a pump on the output shaft.

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Did anyone see the show where a large wrecker company towed an antique 2 ton firetruck and pulled the axle shafts out of the differential and stuffed styrofoam coffee cups butt first to stop any gearlube from leaking out? I thought this way has to be wrong!!!!!!!!!!! how can gearlube be thrown around inside to the diff. with those shafts out to lube those outboard wheel bearings!!!!!!

Remember Ohare's boys are professionals :wacko: ,but when piggy backing new trucks they do the same thing , now I know why the old timers always packed there bearings for that very reason .

There is oil in the hubs already (so it doesn't need to be slung from the diff), but when you pull the shafts, that oil comes drooling out.

The proper way to do this is to have a set of plates on hand that have a filler hole in them, remove the shaft, install the plate, then pour some oil into the filler hole and install the plug.

When you do this, it's no different than a steer axle hub, with oil in the hub cavity well.

I operated wreckers at one time for my daily bread, and have learned that just because a guy has a clipboard, a reflective vest and a tow truck doesn't automatically mean he knows what he's doing.

Had one guy want to use a tow-bar style hitch to hook up to one of my KW T600's with a plastic bumper.

When i was towing I would pull axles , put a rag into a plastic bag stuff that into the rear then duct tape another plastic bag over the hub- trying to keep oil in and dirt out

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Did anyone see the show where a large wrecker company towed an antique 2 ton firetruck and pulled the axle shafts out of the differential and stuffed styrofoam coffee cups butt first to stop any gearlube from leaking out? I thought this way has to be wrong!!!!!!!!!!! how can gearlube be thrown around inside to the diff. with those shafts out to lube those outboard wheel bearings!!!!!!

Remember Ohare's boys are professionals :wacko: ,but when piggy backing new trucks they do the same thing , now I know why the old timers always packed there bearings for that very reason .

There is oil in the hubs already (so it doesn't need to be slung from the diff), but when you pull the shafts, that oil comes drooling out.

The proper way to do this is to have a set of plates on hand that have a filler hole in them, remove the shaft, install the plate, then pour some oil into the filler hole and install the plug.

When you do this, it's no different than a steer axle hub, with oil in the hub cavity well.

I operated wreckers at one time for my daily bread, and have learned that just because a guy has a clipboard, a reflective vest and a tow truck doesn't automatically mean he knows what he's doing.

Had one guy want to use a tow-bar style hitch to hook up to one of my KW T600's with a plastic bumper.

When i was towing I would pull axles , put a rag into a plastic bag stuff that into the rear then duct tape another plastic bag over the hub- trying to keep oil in and dirt out

That works too.

For some reason, I always wound up with the customer who wanted his rig hauled halfway across the country.....so we went all-out.

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When I was in the trucking industry......

The reason we pulled the drive shaft was that it was easier (most times) less messy (all the time) than pulling an axle. That being said, when you lift the front end of the truck, the front input shaft bearing has no lubrication. We were using 50w synthetic at the time in all our trans. While an in town tow may not cause a problem, highway speeds or an extended tow would.

and that's the truth!

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Backin the early 90s I had a Loadstar have the timing gears fail about 50 miles out so the driver called a towing company. and they didn't pull the axles or the driveshaft .At about 20 miles of towing the transmission locked up and the engine transmission unit tried to rotate as a unit, it made almost a quarter of a revolution before the rear tires skidded. After that it needed a new transmission, the block was broke where the motor mounts fastened, fan ,radiator,clutch linkage, etc what a mess.

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