tractorshark

Learning alot, but want more info

Recommended Posts

I just noticed that Fleet Farm is caring IH merchandise. It seemed about they had before was JD. Maybe Case IH finally realized how important this stuff is to fans.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just noticed that Fleet Farm is caring IH merchandise. It seemed about they had before was JD. Maybe Case IH finally realized how important this stuff is to fans.

Blain's Farm & Fleet has been handling the old IH/FARMALL stuff for a couple years, coffee mugs, thermometers, playing cards, T-shirts, etc. My Wife even bought me an IH/FARMALL wallet a couple months ago.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The IH Archives now has the Corporate annual reports online. They're playing around with the website design, so the best way to find the annual reports is to search them.

Lee Grady has been promoted within the Historical Society. He's still covering the IH Collection, but there should be a new archivist in the new part of the year.

I did donate my service bulletin collection and spreadsheet to the archives, so if you are looking for them, hit up the Ask McCormick email!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I retired in 2007 and started as a service Tech in a Company store in 1966 It has been my observation that up until the buy out in 1985 that poor judgement tipped the scales to the inevitable.

Too often people without decision making skills were PROMOTED into higher positions in the Co. rather than fired as they should have been. These people then hid behind office doors and things went downhill from there. Sum it up, Poor management and failure to reinvest in their future. ie: TA versus Quad rangeI never drove a true multi speed power shift until I drove a 6 speed Case in 1985 and I can tell you that if I was buying a tractor that day it would not have been red..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had seen it said here by somone that the M was behind its time compared to the olliver ( no live pto or hyd) but I have a hard time thinking the reason m&w sold so many handclutches, behlen had p/s units, m&w (and others ?) had live hyd add ons was because so many people would rather add these attatchments to what they considered a far superior tractor in the long run. I dont think at that time anyone with a row crop sold anywhere near the numbers farmall did, and in my observations a higher percentage of those farmalls have survived than others

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had seen it said here by somone that the M was behind its time compared to the olliver ( no live pto or hyd) but I have a hard time thinking the reason m&w sold so many handclutches, behlen had p/s units, m&w (and others ?) had live hyd add ons was because so many people would rather add these attatchments to what they considered a far superior tractor in the long run. I dont think at that time anyone with a row crop sold anywhere near the numbers farmall did, and in my observations a higher percentage of those farmalls have survived than others

(I was always told this.) Oliver made a FINE tractor! But their dealerships were WAAAY fewer than I.H. , and the options/implements available for them were limited as well. It was harder to seek things out for them. As we know ,the H sold ONLY second to the Ford 8N in that era helping to boost the popularity of Farmalls.

As we know,they said "FARMALL" on the hood for a reason. Because the one tractor could be outfitted to do most ANY farm task of it's time.

More versatile, more options ,and more easily available to get them.

I have said on here MORE than a few times. I LOOOVE my Super M. It was my "dream tractor" . But if I was not allowed to have an I.H. ,my next choice would have been an Oliver Super 88 with ZERO regrets. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have only read a little bit on this, but it seemed that when IH was restructuring to weather a changing market they tried to finance it with loans. Now you borrow to pay loans, and recieve a higher interest rate. They did what people were doing with credit cards today.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am new to red power and this site, but i did work at a IH dealer in the early 80s and always had red power on the farm. I think the fall was caused by many different things and no one reason was to blame, as with anything if you only knew then what you know now

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I retired in 2007 and started as a service Tech in a Company store in 1966 It has been my observation that up until the buy out in 1985 that poor judgement tipped the scales to the inevitable.

Too often people without decision making skills were PROMOTED into higher positions in the Co. rather than fired as they should have been. These people then hid behind office doors and things went downhill from there. Sum it up, Poor management and failure to reinvest in their future. ie: TA versus Quad rangeI never drove a true multi speed power shift until I drove a 6 speed Case in 1985 and I can tell you that if I was buying a tractor that day it would not have been red..

the thing that most dont think of when they talk about the TA is was that was the only shift on the fly on the market in 1954.

and we have had deere h the 4020 with the 8 speed power shift and m&w turbo was easy to drive but on our farm I had the choice between that or our 1206 with silver shift I always took the old 1206

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a great conversation today with a gentleman who worked at the Rock Island plant for several summers when he was a college student in the early 60's. He worked 11 pm to 7 am in the foundry, mostly shoveling sand off the floor.

He said the plant was very safety conscious, and when there was an incident, everything shut down immediately until it was resolved.
It sounds like the air was heavy with iron dust because he said his skin would be rust colored after a shift and it was uncomfortable. The plant handed out some special salve that was some sort of miracle cure. He said he still has a container of it. I believe it was called "hox salve" or something like that.

The best story was about a bar nearby that would cash paychecks on payday. There was 2 guys by the door with double barrel shotguns. You walked in by them, proceeded up the stairs and up there was a guy with a double barrel shotgun on his lap and he cashed out the checks, and often, most of the money never left the premises. The bar would only shut down from 5am to 6am for floor sweeping.

He said when the 806's first started rolling off the line there was a 60% scrapping rate.

Often the management would argue publicly and loudly on the floor between shifts over who would get what and when as far as supplies and components.

The Union protected fair amount of 'dead weight' who abused the system. 1 guy wandered around all day quoting Bible passages. 1 guy goofed off for 40 hours a week, but then worked well for overtime and piecework.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So, a lot has changed in the 7 years since this thread began. Ag isn't exactly on top of the world presently. Lot of layoffs at all colors. What will become of it? I can't say I'm real excited about the Italian management of red. They're getting more and more like a European tractor every series. Is Racine in danger yet? I hope we don't have to read a book in the near future called "CaseIH, a Merger Tragedy"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, Virginia Veg. said:

So, a lot has changed in the 7 years since this thread began. Ag isn't exactly on top of the world presently. Lot of layoffs at all colors. What will become of it? I can't say I'm real excited about the Italian management of red. They're getting more and more like a European tractor every series. Is Racine in danger yet? I hope we don't have to read a book in the near future called "CaseIH, a Merger Tragedy"

i don't think things are that bad for farmers yet but equipment companies seem to be getting hit. one big problem seems to be the way they've pushed people to lease over the last decade or so which has caused used equipment to pile up. the sheer amount of equipment that is only leased for 2-3 years has to end up somewhere. much of that equipment is also too big for the smaller farmer who either doesn't want it or simply can't afford it. with crop prices falling the small farmers have even less money to spend so that used equipment simply isn't moving and most of the bigger guys are still leasing just as they always have.

heard a rumour the other day that JD bought up 160 acres they plan to fence off to store excess used and repossessed equipment so it would seem they are preparing for the worst and with the way the equipment market is i really wouldn't be surprised if they end up filling that 160 acres pretty quick. also supposedly leasing prices are increasing 50% in an attempt to force people back to buying rather then leasing. not sure how well that's gonna go over now that they have have people used to always having the newest and greatest 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not exactly covering the time of IH being sold, but I joined Case IH as Manager of Combine Headers, one of 6 Engineering Managers we had in Crop Harvesting.  Three of us were located at the East Moline plant, the other 3 in Hinsdale.  The other 2 at East Moline had spent much of their career at the Rock Island plant.  We made at least one trip to Hinsdale weekly so I got to hear a lot of Farmall stories.  One of the guys, who was once head of the Tractor Operation, placed a great deal of the blame for failure on the McCormick family's insistence on being paid their dividend come **** or high water.  Of course the Axial Flow development took a lot of resources but the machine was in production and resources were once again being spent on tractors.  The Tractor QA manager said (and pardon me if I have an error here - we are talking nearly 30 years ago) they had redone the 2+2 and redesigning the power train so it was finally capable of handling the power (the original was cobble existing parts together and cross ones fingers) but along came Case and the project was scrapped.  He had saved copies of the publications - operators manual, sales literature, etc. - by grabbing them out of the trash as they cleaned out at the end.

I am not sure how things were during the International days but East Moline under Tennaco was not a good place to work.  An executive officer was hired from Chrysler and he brought a lot of Chrysler people along with him.  It was management by terror.  Part of the assembler's pay was based on output - if they achieved 100% they got their regular pay but could earn up to 140% with higher output.  I witnessed assemblers using rejected parts to assemble combines because if they waited to get corrected parts, their incentive pay went away.  For 1991 we managers were told by our executive VP that quality cannot be compromised; however, write into your employee's performance plan that their job depends meeting their cost improvement target.  If they failed to meet their annual target we were to terminate them.  Knowing their jobs were at risk, our Engineering staff took unbelievable risks.  Now that I am retired, I own one of those combines.  With many of my breakdowns I recall the cost reduction project that saved a person's job at a cost to the customer.  My used combine is old, over 4,000 hours.  The cost reductions implemented were usually good enough to get it through the warranty period but long term - not the old International standard.

I do have an earlier history with International.  My father became a dealer in 1939 and lost his dealership in 1954 when he would not build a new building in town.  He sold almost all the A's, C's, H's, and M's in this area.  Once International was gone, Case came knocking at the door.  We also farmed and switched to Case on our farm but I was very happy when my dad and uncle got fed up with Case quality and we bought our 806.  That was right as I graduated from college and left the farm only to return after retirement.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have caught a couple of misconceptions on here that seem to be repeated.  Seems several folks think that IH dropped out of the #1 equipment slot in the '80's, when the company was about to fail.  Not so - IH slipped into the #2 position, behind Deere, in 1958.  IH had just gotten rid of one of the worst presidents in its history, John McCafferty, and Deere was celebrating the first major changes made by a really sharp, really aggressive CEO, William Hewitt.  Hewitt was the first Deere president who was not content with running second place behind IH and made bold moves to change that situation.  McCaffrey put engineering and R&D on the back burner behind sales during his tenure, and when Deere replaced the 2-cylinders with the New Generation tractors, IH was suddenly and unfortunately placed in the position of playing catch-up, something they never quite managed to pull off, except possibly with the 88 series.

And guys, I have no problem with Case equipment or the Case company,  but there seems to be a repeated question here as to why anyone would prefer an IH over a Case.  If for no other reason, availability would have to play a part in that.  I live in Tennessee, and I cannot tell you where a single Case dealer was located in this state prior to the Case-IH merger, nor do I recall as a young man ever seeing any of that equipment for sale.  Case just wasn't readily available in this area, and you didn't see it in the fields.  I'm sure it was more available in other areas, especially up North where the farms are larger, but there is a very basic fact that needs to be recalled - from 1902 until 1958, IH was the world leader in agriculture equipment - and not by just a little bit, but by a very wide margin.  You could literally buy IH equipment pretty much anywhere in the civilized world, and few were the equipment companies that could legitimately make that claim.  And although there have been periods of time and certain models of IH equipment that were not up to par, I find it hard to believe that they could ever have achieved that position without superior products to back it up.

I have a good friend who managed a Case-IH dealership for a while, and his stories about his management training were interesting to me.  Like me, he approaches the Case-IH brand from the IH end.  He found it interesting, and somewhat discouraging, that the corporate managerial training focused almost entirely on the history of the Case company and made almost no mention of IH history prior to the merger.  Case-IH sure didn't achieve the "#2 equipment manufacturer in the world" status based on the Case name, whatever you or they may think of it.  And he found it amusing that they did admit that the reason that the Case-IH tractors are red is that the IH dealers who survived the merger refused to sell them in any other color. Since the IH dealers far outnumbered the Case dealers, the company was forced to abandon the Case colors for the new product lines.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know all the issues with the 86s that caused them to be unpopular, but another issue besides the shifting problems  that plagued those models were hydraulic system problems.  My dad bought an early 1086 in 1976 and had no end of trouble with it blowing O rings in the internal parts of the hydraulic system.  He lost 3 weeks of peak tillage season one year because of this, and spent a considerable amount of time and money trucking it back and forth to the dealership until he traded for a Deere 4440 in 1979.  He never looked back from that, but I always kept my preference for IH.

Kinda interesting to me was one of the posts on here about how the SoundGard cab on the Deeres drew customers away from IH.  Dad was just the opposite, one thing he missed after the trade was the larger cab on the 1086.  He missed the larger size and liked the fact that you could get into the IH cab from either side, whereas the Deere cab had only one door and it was a bit tight for him.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/12/2016 at 9:30 PM, flashy said:

 

The best story was about a bar nearby that would cash paychecks on payday. There was 2 guys by the door with double barrel shotguns. You walked in by them, proceeded up the stairs and up there was a guy with a double barrel shotgun on his lap and he cashed out the checks, and often, most of the money never left the premises. The bar would only shut down from 5am to 6am for floor sweeping.

He said when the 806's first started rolling off the line there was a 60% scrapping rate.

Often the management would argue publicly and loudly on the floor between shifts over who would get what and when as far as supplies and components.

The Union protected fair amount of 'dead weight' who abused the system. 1 guy wandered around all day quoting Bible passages. 1 guy goofed off for 40 hours a week, but then worked well for overtime and piecework.

Yes, The FARMALL TAP was a popular hang-out for workers.  The place suffered the same fate as Farmall.

The story I heard about the 706/806 series start-up was the design of oil circulation in the rearend casting REALLY pushed the limits of automated casting mold making technology available in 1963.  Thin wall steel conduit was used for oil flow paths inside casting walls.  Keeping those conduits in position while you poured 2700 degree molten iron into the molds took a while to perfect the process,  That's where the 50-60% scrap rate was.  Most castings were able to be reworked and within a month or so the amount of scrappage dropped significantly.

   I have seen many Nose-to-Nose confrontations on shop floors.  Most at Farmall were in the small Foreman and General Foreman offices located in every dept.  The offices were just big enough for a desk, a file cabinent, and 2-3 chairs.  Once you got over "Across the Street" into the upper managers offices the discussions got much more heated.  I was in the Manager of Material Procurement and Distribution when an Assembly Superintendant told him He thought it was "Time for a new Tire Buyer".  The Superintendant always tried to stir things up, cause drama, I had caught him screaming about being out of tires when I had been in the plant between Midnight and 2 AM finding the tires he needed scattered all over his department, most of them 20 feet from his office door.  I made him look like an idiot to my Boss's Boss's Boss.

There were two UAW locals at Farmall, #1309 for assembly and production personel,  and #1310 for skilled trades, tool makers, machine repair, electricians, millrights. Like all places that employ people, about 5% do anything and everything possible to keep production going, 20% try really really hard to keep things going. About 50% are your typical good employees, then 20% are the ones that do as little as possible, and the last 5% try to do anything but work all day every day.  I've been in plants that employ 3500, and about 650, and about 500, and about 300, 150, and 15.  Those percentages are accurate in all cases.  One Huge advantage a Union gives a company is a reliable source of trained manpower.  One place I worked, Not an IH plant, we had 3 unions,  one guy in one dept. wandered around all over the plant 8 hours a day, even in the front offices, I think he even worked over-time so he could wander around at Time and a Half.  I liked working a little over-time too, 4 to 16-20 hours a week.  One job I had I got paid straight time for actual hours worked.  I worked 3000 to 3200 hours a year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was a mechanic at two IH dealerships in the mid-70's.

I was involved in replacing differentials in the recall of the 66 series. We had to replace the differentials in the tractors sold from December thru February and that was 22 units. It was a small but busy dealership at that time. We never found a bad differential in all 22 changes.

I got "A Corporate Tragedy" by inter-library loan and just finished it last night. Knowing the outcome helped when reading the book. A few things really stuck out.

1) Refrigeration was a great money maker for awhile. Once all the farm wives had an IH refrigerator and freezer,  they no longer had a decent sales plan. How many refrigerators/freezers were sold to the farmer, who stopped for parts, and he took one home to the wife. Probably most. The book stated they would not die. Why replace something that works? IH had no marketing plan to sell to anyone other than farmers. When it no longer was profitable, they needed to get out of the business or come up with a sales plan to get into urban America's homes. I still have an IH refrigerator that works great. It won't die!

2) Labor abused IH. They used strikes and held IH hostage many times until they got what they wanted. JD and Cat had less labor costs. IH done a survey every other year and they were paying $300 million too much in labor. They never done anything about it other than do another study 2 years later. The big strike was a killer to IH and was part of the cause of their demise.  But corporate allowed it to go on unsettle for to long. It was not the main cause but a part of IH's demise.

3) IH lagged behind in technology. The 1939 Farmall M was basically the transmission/differential for everything up thru the 1963 560. Then the differential issues the 560's had proved they had exceeded the amount of power the rear end could hold. They should have been planning a new tractor every 10 years at least. Times were changing fast and IH just changed everything above the cast iron. IH needed an alternative better than the Power Shift. The farmer wanted better and JD offered it.

4) The economy going in the tank did not help the company. Interest rates were off the scale and no one was buying anything unless they had cash and most wanted to hold onto that until the economy came around. Archie and corporate failed to take that into account.

5) Corporate never listened to their dealers during the down turn. Dealers knew what was happening, why it was happening and could tell corporate their wants and needs. But Archie never listed. He was told many times and believed that production would save the company. By the time he realized this, it was to late.

6) Construction should have been sold off years earlier. It was a cash cow that ate buckets of money and never really brought in a decent profit. They wanted to outdo Cat and that was hard to do. No one in corporate could see this. This was a bad business choice that went on for years. 

7) Corporate was to old school. They rode on their status of being #1 in AG. When they were knocked down to #2, they needed to research why and figure out what the farmer wanted and needed to get that customer back. They just went, "Oh Well" and was satisfied with #2. The company lacked firm direction for years. After the strike, it was Archie jumping back and forth. Good people quit due to indecision. Some also needed to go.

The Good of IH.

1) They had the best engine in the DT466 family. There was talk of selling the engine to outside companies but never did. It would have made them money. The 6.9 contact with Ford was a great money maker and brought IH's name up a lot as the diesel that powered Ford trucks.

2) The hydrostat was a great tractor for users of a lot of PTO. It had it's purpose and place and was a great asset to IH.

3) The TA was a great advantage to IH. It was the first shift on the go and under load transmission of it's time. It should have been replaced with something better by year 10. That new tractor would have then went head to head with the JD 4010.

3) Trucks were the money maker as they were assembled mostly of other suppliers parts. That is why Navistar is still considered IH and was not sold to Tenneco.

4) The dealer and parts network was great. JD never had the ability to furnish what was needed by the farmer, so fast.

5) IH had great people that cared. Even corporate cared, all the way to the top. But good business decisions are also crucial, along with caring, to keep a company afloat.

6) Someone at the end of the book said that IH would be studied for years by Harvard and the other big business schools. Hopefully IH's demise will help other companies avoid the issues IH had. The demise of IH ultimately falls on corporate. They OK'd who was in charge and what was done within the company. Everyone under corporate needed approval to change things. So if changes were made, or were not, corporate controlled it. "The Buck Stopped at the Top". There were labor and economic conditions that effected IH. Most of these issues were not addressed, or in the wrong way, and had life long negative impacts on many peoples lives.

I am not knocking anyone or anything. These are just my observations about the information found in the book. I certainly wish that corporate would have pulled off the recovery. Then IH would still be a US company and probably still out of Chicago. A part of our country died with IH and I wish it had not. May this corporate tragedy never happen again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Diesel Doctor said:

I was a mechanic at two IH dealerships in the mid-70's.

I was involved in replacing differentials in the recall of the 66 series. We had to replace the differentials in the tractors sold from December thru February and that was 22 units. It was a small but busy dealership at that time. We never found a bad differential in all 22 changes.

I got "A Corporate Tragedy" by inter-library loan and just finished it last night. Knowing the outcome helped when reading the book. A few things really stuck out.

1) Refrigeration was a great money maker for awhile. Once all the farm wives had an IH refrigerator and freezer,  they no longer had a decent sales plan. How many refrigerators/freezers were sold to the farmer, who stopped for parts, and he took one home to the wife. Probably most. The book stated they would not die. Why replace something that works? IH had no marketing plan to sell to anyone other than farmers. When it no longer was profitable, they needed to get out of the business or come up with a sales plan to get into urban America's homes. I still have an IH refrigerator that works great. It won't die!

2) Labor abused IH. They used strikes and held IH hostage many times until they got what they wanted. JD and Cat had less labor costs. IH done a survey every other year and they were paying $300 million too much in labor. They never done anything about it other than do another study 2 years later. The big strike was a killer to IH and was part of the cause of their demise.  But corporate allowed it to go on unsettle for to long. It was not the main cause but a part of IH's demise.

3) IH lagged behind in technology. The 1939 Farmall M was basically the transmission/differential for everything up thru the 1963 560. Then the differential issues the 560's had proved they had exceeded the amount of power the rear end could hold. They should have been planning a new tractor every 10 years at least. Times were changing fast and IH just changed everything above the cast iron. IH needed an alternative better than the Power Shift. The farmer wanted better and JD offered it.

4) The economy going in the tank did not help the company. Interest rates were off the scale and no one was buying anything unless they had cash and most wanted to hold onto that until the economy came around. Archie and corporate failed to take that into account.

5) Corporate never listened to their dealers during the down turn. Dealers knew what was happening, why it was happening and could tell corporate their wants and needs. But Archie never listed. He was told many times and believed that production would save the company. By the time he realized this, it was to late.

6) Construction should have been sold off years earlier. It was a cash cow that ate buckets of money and never really brought in a decent profit. They wanted to outdo Cat and that was hard to do. No one in corporate could see this. This was a bad business choice that went on for years. 

7) Corporate was to old school. They rode on their status of being #1 in AG. When they were knocked down to #2, they needed to research why and figure out what the farmer wanted and needed to get that customer back. They just went, "Oh Well" and was satisfied with #2. The company lacked firm direction for years. After the strike, it was Archie jumping back and forth. Good people quit due to indecision. Some also needed to go.

The Good of IH.

1) They had the best engine in the DT466 family. There was talk of selling the engine to outside companies but never did. It would have made them money. The 6.9 contact with Ford was a great money maker and brought IH's name up a lot as the diesel that powered Ford trucks.

2) The hydrostat was a great tractor for users of a lot of PTO. It had it's purpose and place and was a great asset to IH.

3) The TA was a great advantage to IH. It was the first shift on the go and under load transmission of it's time. It should have been replaced with something better by year 10. That new tractor would have then went head to head with the JD 4010.

3) Trucks were the money maker as they were assembled mostly of other suppliers parts. That is why Navistar is still considered IH and was not sold to Tenneco.

4) The dealer and parts network was great. JD never had the ability to furnish what was needed by the farmer, so fast.

5) IH had great people that cared. Even corporate cared, all the way to the top. But good business decisions are also crucial, along with caring, to keep a company afloat.

6) Someone at the end of the book said that IH would be studied for years by Harvard and the other big business schools. Hopefully IH's demise will help other companies avoid the issues IH had. The demise of IH ultimately falls on corporate. They OK'd who was in charge and what was done within the company. Everyone under corporate needed approval to change things. So if changes were made, or were not, corporate controlled it. "The Buck Stopped at the Top". There were labor and economic conditions that effected IH. Most of these issues were not addressed, or in the wrong way, and had life long negative impacts on many peoples lives.

I am not knocking anyone or anything. These are just my observations about the information found in the book. I certainly wish that corporate would have pulled off the recovery. Then IH would still be a US company and probably still out of Chicago. A part of our country died with IH and I wish it had not. May this corporate tragedy never happen again.

A lot of what you said here is similar to what uncle George mentioned about IH from his experience as an engineer with them. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

it came down to bad management and greed- not just the unions but the stockholders.  I was just looking through the Lee Klancher "Red Tractors" book the other day and what precipitated Archie McCardell's firing was not being able to write the  dividend check.   I suspect a *lot* of the extended McCormick and maybe Deering families lived quite well off a company to which they contributed nothing.  At least the union workers were *supposed* to be building things.   Deere made one relatively easy choice- to concentrate on farm equipment- and  the hard  choices to cut back on the dividend,  put the money into R and D and facilities, *and* deal with labor in a responsible yet fair fashion.   Harvester didn't

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, 234-IA said:

 and  the hard  choices to cut back on the dividend,  put the money into R and D and facilities, *and* deal with labor in a responsible yet fair fashion.   Harvester didn't

Yes, those are the issues for sure!

All of these are symptoms of a management that was AWOL, not paying attention or just too incompetent to know what was going on.  They were milking the cow with no concern for the calf.  Too much of that going on today.  Management compensation is too much into stock options which incentivises artificially raising the stock price by handing out dividends, stock buy backs and the like and not enough on real productivity.  Im afraid that that is what has been driving the market the last few years again and we are getting ready for a big fall again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/28/2013 at 12:01 AM, GuyFay said:

The IH Archives now has the Corporate annual reports online. They're playing around with the website design, so the best way to find the annual reports is to search them.

Lee Grady has been promoted within the Historical Society. He's still covering the IH Collection, but there should be a new archivist in the new part of the year.

I did donate my service bulletin collection and spreadsheet to the archives, so if you are looking for them, hit up the Ask McCormick email!

Guy,

I love those guys. They told me you'd been in there. I really want to go visit them, but it's not often I get from NY to WI, you know? I want to personally thank you for putting together the work you have. I am restoring an entirely un-special, and non-unique Farmall C that's priceless to me (isn't that always the case?), but I have questions. Everywhere I had turned everyone said "get Guy Fay's book". So guess what I'm getting for father's day? 

I still do have one question that no one has answered for me with certainty: At what level of subassembly were the tractors (specifically, the C in my case) painted. I know they wouldn't have painted individual parts, unless they were to sit on warehouse shelves for a long time. And given the production rate of Farmalls, my guess is nothing sat long. Also, I know they wouldn't have painted only the finished tractor, but that would leave a lot of virgin steel... Can you provide any insight? Maybe it's in your book, in which case, I apologize for wasting your time.

Considering IH has changed hands a few times unlike Deere, it's nice that there are a few really solid sources for information such as your books and the Wisconsin Historical Society, and that the information is not lost to moths and mold, like the fate of many documents.

Tell me, do you know how comprehensive their collection of technical drawings is? I've got an OS-4 for which I'd like to have a few parts made, and I'd like to eventually get my hands on an O-4, but most of the ones available don't have any sheet metal left. My thought is, if I can get my hand on actual drawings, I can have exact copies made.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/9/2018 at 12:47 PM, 234-IA said:

  Deere made one relatively easy choice- to concentrate on farm equipment- and  the hard  choices to cut back on the dividend,  put the money into R and D and facilities, *and* deal with labor in a responsible yet fair fashion.   

Lets not forget that John Deere Insurance kept the lights on at Deere for most of the 1980's, I even had Deere car insurance until they stopped doing personal lines of insurance.  All the lawn mowers they made back then kept Horicon profitable too.  A Deere marketing manager I was taking MBA classes with at St. Ambrose University in Davenport in 1977 said Deere was 80% ag and 20% construction equipment, and in 10 years they would be 80% construction and 20% ag.  Their plan actually was to beat CAT at Cat's game.  They have made big strides in gaining construction market share.  And they are #1 in forestry equipment by buying the producers of equipment.

Far as treating employees fairly,  ask anyone at Deere how the new hires since 1997 paychecks compare to pre-1997 employees. Not many of the pre'97 employees left,  their pensions pay them $100,000+ per year, Deere tried to take retiree health care away couple years ago and retirees took Deere to court. The two biggest goals of labor unions is equal pay for equal work and protecting employee seniority, but Deere managed to get long time union workers to short-change new hires with substantially lower wages for less outsourcing.  Deere actually had a longer strike in 1987 that the big IH strike of '79/'80. IH strike was 5 months and a week, Deere was 6 months.  It started as a selective work stoppage at 3 plants by the UAW,  then Deere shuttered the rest of their plants.  Even though I spent most of my work life drawing a salary,  I firmly believe in union labor, equal pay, published seniority lists, equal opportunities for employee training, job advancement,  employee benefits, retirement pensions, etc.  From what I hear, Deere's union is afraid to challange the company on anything. Waste of employees two hours of wages per month union dues.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now