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Eric Nelson

1974 Scout II value

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Im looking at a 1974 scout II has an automatic tranny, 4x4 works good, has 304 engine, original danas under it, but bondo is cracking in some spots, needs new starter, has no keys!!! (owner lost them has clear title though) and just a little tlc... rust not a major issue. asking $900 i think its a good deal.. But i dont know anything about the 304s... are parts okay to find? are they underpowered and what kind of milege do they get? any help is greatly appreciated! PS my son wants to buy it for a project car :D

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The 304 isn't any harder to get parts than the 266, 345, or 392.

I have a 304 in a 4X4 3/4-ton T-all. It won't pull as hard as a F*** with a 460 but it will run all day long at 14-16 MPG.

In a Scout II a 304 is more than adequate for power. In good tune, 15-18 MPG can be expected if you keep the speed down. With some tweaking you just might see 20 MPG on a good day.

For a project car for a kid it sounds as if you have found a pretty good project.

For that price, it sounds like a pretty good deal.

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Eric-----------

We had a '73 or '74 Scout II with the 6 cyld 258 American Motors engine (same as most Jeeps) with a 3 speed manual transmission. Never ran out of power. Unbelievable little work horse. We stil have it (not running any more)-------not much left of the body. Beware of the rust worms-----we had done alot of Bondo work on this old Scout. My son ran it for years

Have a '63 Loadstar 1600 with a 304 (not running anymore)----but great engine.

First thing I would do is install a good havy roll bar and full seat belts-----that 304 will probably "scoot" it on down the highway. Should make an excellent project truck---------and all of the young folks like them.

Lots of parts around once you find the right salvage yards.

Good luck--------

Delta Dirt

Avon, Ms 38723

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At $900, it sounds like a keeper. If you haven't done it already, you might want to check the inner rocker panels. They can be difficult to replace if rusted out.

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That 304 should be plenty adequate for you. Mine in the 72 Scout II was great. Only 2 WD with automatic but it was a good highway vehicle too. 17 to 18 mpg at the speed limit. Same engine as is in the Loadstars and they just run fine in spite of huge overloads and the usual farm duties.

See my old Scout II running at

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In this area (I'm not far from you), rust is the big concern. Check it over closely. I've bought a lot of Scouts for cheap that are terribly rusty but can run well with a tune-up. $900 is a fair price if the body is OK.

The steering column is just a Saginaw, the same as GM and AMC used so you can get a new ignition cylinder at your auto parts store of choice. You could have a locksmith make a key but a new cylinder will be cheaper and will be new. The steering column is not a lot of fun to tear into, lots of little pieces. Some guys are scared of them. If you maintain the tractors listed in your signature, you can easily handle a Scout.

The starter is a Delco, like GM. The "start wire" on the solenoid goes bad from getting hot over and over. lots of guys end up installing a push button on the dash and find out there really isn't anything wrong with the starter.

Come see me sometime. Especially if you need parts or just want to see a bunch of binders. E-mail me for directions. 35-40 minutes from Moville

The 304 is a heck of a motor. they wrap quickly, for an IH SV. I've got one in a '71 Scout 800, in a '74 Loadstar, and a few other vehicles. Come take a ride in my 800 and you will see that they have plenty of power in a Scout. I wouldn't take a 304 out to put a 345 in unless there was something wrong with the 304. It wouldn't be worth the effort if they were in similar condition. 345 may have more torque but it is just overkill.

I've not had good luck with the automatics but I maybe have just gotten them when they are on their last legs. They are just a Chrysler 727 so they aren't anything hard to get rebuilt. Lots of 727s that held up well in Chryslers in the '70s. I've got a guy who is going to help me rebuild one since I want a decent one and I've got kids nearing driving age. I plan to set them up a Scout to learn on and bang up and learn how to maintain and fix.

They are a great project car for kids.

Ed Sohm

Battle Crrek

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In this area (I'm not far from you), rust is the big concern. Check it over closely. I've bought a lot of Scouts for cheap that are terribly rusty but can run well with a tune-up. $900 is a fair price if the body is OK.

Ed Sohm

Battle Crrek

ditto on the rust issue here in Iowa.

If the Bondo you see is cracking this should tell you two red flags right off the bat. One is that it was more than likely put on by someone who didnt know what they were doing and probably doesnt have a clue how to properly fix rust in the first place. Secondly, that bondo is hiding something you better start diggin for. 900 sounds cheap now until you start diggin into it and find out you bought a turd :blink:

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I'll second what old F-20 said. Be careful and take a magnet. Eason

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I think a 304 would be a bit easyer on a 727 trany

My scout terra body is getting rebuilt now but I haven't desided about the 727 trany yet. It only shifts manualy{spag?]

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I won't say that they are prone to problems. I think that they are abused. The fluid and filters aren't changed like they should be and the bands aren't adjusted when they should. That leads to failure.

I don't want to say it is anything inherent to a 727, I've abused mine too.

Ed

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If traction is good ;a345 has a little more torque than well used 727 can take.I buggered mine up trying to chase a bull from a field with a couple of other trucks a good horse and a quad. The bull was "on probation"anyway as he had charged me before. He wasen't worth wrecking trucks ,horses or family so we shot him . Should have shot him the time before and saved the 727 tranny. Salvage bulls and cows have very little or no value here

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I had a 727 behind the 392 in my old Travelette and it was used hard carrying campers and pulling gooseneck trailers for over 300k before it gave up. They were used in motor homes too without much problem. I've had 4 or 5 304's and they were all good motors. The weak spot is the cam bearings. If you hear lifters ticking when you first start it or the oil pressure is near 0 at idle, that isn't good. I'd really look close at the underside of this Scout. I bought a '77 that didn't look bad at all from the street but when I got into it, I ended up buying every piece of sheetmetal made and making a few that wern't. Turned into a 7 year project and went from $750 to about $6500.

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Well my son is now the proud owner of a 1974 Scout II :D We bought it yesterday for $700 cash, hespretty excited beings hes been bothering me about getting one for the past 2 years.... But I dont know much about em even though my family has always had red equipment so this will be an expirence :D

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If you have always had red equipment then you already know some of the odd ways in which IHC put stuff together.

One of the biggest problems with IHC trucks is the plastic connectors on the electrical lines. The through the firewall ones are about the worst.

If your Scout has electrical issues, start with making sure all of the electrical connections are making good connections. Pay particular attention to the grounds.

In more than one IHC bus and truck I have had to bypass the factory plugs and have had to make my own plugs. It isn't easy working under the dash board but after the third or fourth time trying to diagnose the same problem it begins to not look quite so bad to replace what isn't working correctly.

You may want to go over to www.justih.org or www.binderbulletin.org. Both of those websites have forums with lots of Scout people.

Good luck and have fun.

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