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stampmaint1

Hauling hay

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post-6713-1227912186_thumb.jpg Hauled 3 loads like this home today. 15 bales per load. Bales average 1800 lbs each. This is the truck with the 400 hp cummins. I guess I'll keep it around now. I got a 1 ton Chevy pickup now that I thought I could use for this. This trailer put a lot of weight on the truck the way the axles are set back. Didn't want to tear up my new to me pickup so I put the transtar on it. The old transtar can take this load down the road as fast as you dare to drive, till the trailer tires blow out. Somewhere near 80 mph. 10 ply radials load range E. I never had tire trouble with this trailer till I bought the Transtar. Used to use a F-500 ford with a gas V8. Never could go over 50 mph with it.

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if they are 10 ply tires (load range E) you should be running at LEAST 80 psi when tire is cold (first thing of a morning BEFORE you load it or move it). Otherwise read the load max poundage on the side..you may be overloading the tires even though the trailer will haul it.

and just because the truck will haul the crap at 80 I'm glad I'm not in front of you while you're doing it..you're averaging 4500# per tire not counting the trailer weight. Around here the brakes wouldn't have made it thru the 1st hill and the state troopers seem to lose all sense of humor when they see this. I speak from personal past lead-footed experience. My old Transtar is a tandem with a Detroit that never quits winding..I had it at the Red Power roundup in 2004.

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The tires are rated for 3400 lbs each. The axles are good for 7000 each, so I should be good for 20,400 lbs between the 3. A lot of the total weight is resting on the truck. Being that the total net weight of the hay is 28,000 lbs, I don't think I am overloading them. I have learned the hard way not to let this truck be all it can be. I have used this same rig to haul tractors to shows. Blew out plenty of tires till I started to hold it back. I would air up the tires to 80 psi before I left. The tires failed like a recap would, the tread cap just peels off. I was left with a scalped tire so to speak. Sometimes it would still be up when I got there. Tried many different brands with the same trouble. Slow down and they would live. Tire stores would tell me that I am putting to much air in them. Never did believe that, but never tried it either.

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Thats a cool truck, Dad has one like with the old detroit in it ,he when an stretched it out to a 22ft flat bed. hauls 11 5 1/2 x 4 rolls, really nice little hay truck.

redsthebest

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That looks like a good setup for that load. As long as you have electric brakes on the trailer.

I'm guessing your gross weight to be around 45,000 loaded. I'd guess about 2/3's of that weight would be on the truck, so that's roughly 30,000 on the truck and 15,000 on the trailer. Which is perfect, that's right were you want it. When I load my truck, I like to get my truck up to weight and put the rest on the back (trailer). The trailer is usually about 5,000 under weight.

You shouldn't be anywhere near weight (rating) on the the trailer, so you souldn't be having the tire issues your having. When the tread seperates like that, it's caused by excessive heat. The main culprit for excessive heat is low air pressure. If your tire are aired up to full pressure cold and with no load on them, I'd be looking for an alignment problem. Also, you may have a suspension problem, causing more weight to be put on one axle than another. Either way, you shouldn't be having tire problems. No matter how fast you go with that load.

Is it always the same tire or axle that blows?? You are using acutal trailer tires, right?? Car/truck tires, even though they may be rated for the weight, will fail quickly in a trailer application.

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The tire failures are random. There are electric brakes on all 3 axles and a controller in the truck. I have always used LT tires. Maybe thats my trouble. Rims are 16". What would be the toughest tire I could use?

The floor is getting in bad shape too. The last time I replaced the floor I bought what was called Boxcar floor planks. 3" thick. Haven't been able to find anymore here lately.

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If at all possible I would try to find a few dually low pro axles like they have on drop decks and detachable gooseneck's or add on another two or three axles lol.

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Hello all , You need to talk to a good tire dealer & the cheap trailer tires aren't always the answer . A good tire man should help you get the best tire for your needs :D . Have you ever weighted the whole loaded truck/trailer to see what you have on each axle ? That's the only way to see what you have . On the wood plank , have you tried state or county DOT yards for used bridge plank ? I work for county highway dept. here & we still deal w/wood deck bridges . Most times when we re-deck a bridge there are quite a few good used planks to be had B) . Boomer

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Yeah, the LT's won't cut it. I'm not sure why, but truck tires in a trailer application don't last very long. It must be more stressful for some reason..... seems to me a tires a tire and weights weight, but in my experiance they just self destruct.

A 235/85R/16 load range E is good for 3500 lbs. That would be 21,000 lbs for your tridem, which is all the axles are rated for anyway. I think your setup is fine (trailer), you don't want to haul much more with that truck anyway. Just need to get some good trailer tires and be good to go.

My buddy has worked at the tire store here in town for years and knows everything there is to know about tires. I just put a set of trailer tires on my car trailer and he recommended Greenballs. I've never heard of them, but they are a good tire. The ride is nice, and they are wearing really well. I usually have them loaded at or near 75% capacity (3500 lbs. cap.) and several thousand highway miles cruising at 65, and no problems.

Greenball Tires

Oh yeah, ditto on weighing each axle with a load on sometime. Sometimes the equalizers get messed up so one axle loads heavier than the rest.... they sould be nearly equal. Also, your truck looks a little light in the front, is your fifth wheel set way back??

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Triple axles may be your problem.Think about the side wall loads when you turn,everything pivots on the center axle dragging the other two,truck tires aren't made to do that.Look at horse/stock trailers you hardly ever see a triaxle.They spend almost all their time on the road at speed, most livestock guys with experience won't even look at a triaxle trailer unless it's cheap and being used for short hauls.

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Triple axles may be your problem.Think about the side wall loads when you turn,everything pivots on the center axle dragging the other two,truck tires aren't made to do that.Look at horse/stock trailers you hardly ever see a triaxle.They spend almost all their time on the road at speed, most livestock guys with experience won't even look at a triaxle trailer unless it's cheap and being used for short hauls.

I was thinking the same thing.

I have to wonder why you want to run 80 with loads like that anyway.

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I have had the same tire failures with a tandem axle livestock trailer, so it is not only with the tri axle that it happens. On the tandem too I have use LT tires. When I turn the tri axle around I try not to look at the tires. It's not pretty the way they slide sideways. Then I see spread axle flatbeds on the road and wonder if that is my problem then how do the spread axle flatbeds get by with it. Same situation only maybe more since the forward and rear axles are much farther apart than mine. The trailer in the pic is a gooseneck. The ball is behind the fifth wheel on the truck so it is loaded on the rear of the frame. The truck has the power to go 80, but I don't. 50 mph is tops for me with this load. Another thing to ponder is large concrete trucks. I have seen 12 yard trucks with 4 axles in a row on the ground. Some have 5 in a row but the most forward axle does steer somewhat. All my tire problems have been with the trailer loaded down with tractors going to shows. I do like to go the speed limit. I blew two of them on a one way trip 60 miles. I did have a lot of tractors on that load. On the way back home I went about 40 mph and made it fine. I did stop at the COOP and weighed the trailer. Didn't weigh each axle, but all 3 together added up to 26,000. I admit I was overloaded on that trip. The last time was a 400 mile trip with only a 4020 John Deere setting directly over the axles. Made it to the destination empty no problem. Lost 2 more tires on the way home. Just going the speed limit. Couldn't have been overweight with that one. The tandem livestock trailer has problems when full of fat cattle going 60 miles. I think I need different tires. The Greenball tires sound good as well as finding 12 plys. I'll check with the County about planks. A friend tells me that a county 40 miles away from me sells them for .19 cents per foot. The last consignment auction I went to they brought quite a bit more than that.

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I think if you switch to some trailer tires your problems will be solved. There is no reason you shouln't be able to cruise 60-65 all day long.

The tridem won't make tires blow. It certainly wears them faster making sharp turns cause it scrubs the front and rear axle and pivots on the center. But, that's just the nature of the beast. My trailer has a fixed tridem, although I can lift the forward axle. When I'm manuvering around in tight areas I have to lift the rear axle cause it steers, and that puts over 50,000 lbs. on the tridem, but has yet to cause a tire to blow... I usually get a year out of the front axle, and a year and half out of the center two (4 axle trailer). Spread axles are even worse because they pivot on one axle or the other. There is some serious scrubbing going on when turning one of those, sometimes it will bog the truck down. Most of those have dump valves so they can dump the air out of one axle suspension and lessen the tire wear.

A little planning ahead can greatly prolong tire life. Make turns as wide as possible, instead of doing "U" turns, do "T" turns, ALWAYS keep air pressure equal, etc.

Tridems have been around for years and have an application. Specifically on a trailer like yours where deck height needs to be kept low. They do wear tires faster, but it doesn't cause them to blow out. Around here, most 4 axle trailers have a fixed tridem with a steerable/liftable axle in the back. Some, like mine, have a liftable front axle. Most dump truck pup trailers have a fixed tridem with a steerable axle in the front. Some have a fixed quad too.... :o

Here's a close up of my ride. With 26 tires, I know a thing or two about getting the most out of them that I can. Every mile counts when they cost 300.00-400.00 a piece.... :o:lol::lol:

post-1610-1228163501_thumb.jpg

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Hey overland Nice truck How much can you gross with all that rubber? Is your trailer 53ft? The pics makes it look a mile long. Guess you dont pull many u turns

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No, not many u turns with that thing unless it's a last resort. It is a 53 footer, and the tractor is 282" WB, which is pretty long too....

I can put about 68,000 lbs. on the deck, which puts my gross around 103,000 lbs.

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No, not many u turns with that thing unless it's a last resort. It is a 53 footer, and the tractor is 282" WB, which is pretty long too....

I can put about 68,000 lbs. on the deck, which puts my gross around 103,000 lbs.

Hello all , Good looking outfit . Seen your Birthday listed the other day but got called away from computer . Happy Late B-day !!! Boomer

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Thanks for the close up of your truck Overland 47. That's a super rig for sure. I don't see setups like that very often.

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Your tire problem could be overload;the boys here haul 9 to 10,000 bales ayear and some of the loads are weighted. the way your load looks to me this is the way it would look over a scale.

trailer weight------------6000 lbs.

bales; 15x 1800----------27000 lbs.

gross trailer weight-----33000 lbs.

3/4 of gr.trailer wgh.---24750 lbs.

6 tires; wgh. Per tire----4125 lbs.

John

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Guest pukeko
The tires are rated for 3400 lbs each. The axles are good for 7000 each, so I should be good for 20,400 lbs between the 3. A lot of the total weight is resting on the truck. Being that the total net weight of the hay is 28,000 lbs, I don't think I am overloading them. I have learned the hard way not to let this truck be all it can be. I have used this same rig to haul tractors to shows. Blew out plenty of tires till I started to hold it back. I would air up the tires to 80 psi before I left. The tires failed like a recap would, the tread cap just peels off. I was left with a scalped tire so to speak. Sometimes it would still be up when I got there. Tried many different brands with the same trouble. Slow down and they would live. Tire stores would tell me that I am putting to much air in them. Never did believe that, but never tried it either.

Why do you think you need to drive 80 m.p h.with hay?Is your time more important than anyone elses?It is very irresponsible to drive like that,endangering others on the highway!!Wth that rig ,unless you have about 7000 lbs on the hitch,you are overloaded!!As far as recaps ,Bandag Cold process are the only way to go.As far as tire pressures go,an uderinflated tire at that speed can reach temps of up to 230F;yes ,thats right!due to the side wall flexing,even those 10 plys you are running! "Real " truckers dont operate like that!!

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Guest pukeko
Your tire problem could be overload;the boys here haul 9 to 10,000 bales ayear and some of the loads are weighted. the way your load looks to me this is the way it would look over a scale.

trailer weight------------6000 lbs.

bales; 15x 1800----------27000 lbs.

gross trailer weight-----33000 lbs.

3/4 of gr.trailer wgh.---24750 lbs.

6 tires; wgh. Per tire----4125 lbs.

John

My !0 ply235 /85 16,s on the 1 ton,are rated at 3220 per tyre.

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Iv'e met a few loads of bales at that speed,late at night,no flashing lights and crowding the center line with the truck. Takes you by surprise when the bales go by the mirror.

We haul some with a three axel gooseneck and a 1ton with duels. We go over a scale with most loads and 10 bale are our limit. They weigh around 1720 lb .235x 16 tires. some are 10 ply but we replace with 14's

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