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Michael Halsall

Farmall H & M wide front end variations

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Here is a question for the Farmall H & M experts-

The early Farmall H and M had an option of the Wide Front End that seemed to come in several different styles.

The "High Clearance" style as used on the HV and MV and there were two different styles on the H and M.

I have never actually seen a wide fronted H or M, but from photos there appears to have been "short wheelbase" and "long wheelbase" style wide front axle.

Compare these two images-

1942 Farmall MD in America

http://www.wisconsinhistory.org/whi/fullimage.asp?id=23690

1949 Farmall M in Britain

http://www.wisconsinhistory.org/whi/fullimage.asp?id=24762

Was there any technical reason for the different front axle design?

I know that the long wheelbase style added over 10" to the overall length of the tractor.

Was the longer wheelbase style available on the Super M or Super H?

Regards from Michael Halsall

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The Framall M parts book show two different positions for the US made wide front axle. The long wheel base version enabled the normal front mounted cultivators to be mounted behind the axle. The short wheel base position effectively kept the same wheel base as the narrow front end tractors but then the cultivators would have the axle in the way. The same attachment was used but there were two mounting positions. The US made wide front ax

The Britlish Farmall BM used a redesigned wide front axle which appears to be stronger and only came with the extended wheel base. The steering linkages were all arranged to the rear of the axle The Australian made Farmall AM also seems to have used the British BM wide front axle. I have seen a British BM wide front axle fitted on a US made Farmall H.

The Farmall Ms were often used in New Zealand as a general purpose tractor pulling only trailed implements but were preferred in many cases because they exhibited a greater available stability in both transverse (due to long rear axles) and longitudinal directions (due to longer wheelbase) than that available on the Standard W-6s etc.. My father using an M to plow part way up terraces in 1945 overturned the tractor (a US made 1940 model) when it stalled on a headland near at the base of a terrace, started to run backwards onto the the plow and reared up when the brakes where applied, it then rolled over sideways. It was replace with a new M with a wide front axle. the two photographs show the 1940 narrow front end and the 1945 wide front end.

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The Farmall Ms were often used in New Zealand as a general purpose tractor pulling only trailed implements but were preferred in many cases because they exhibited a greater available stability in both transverse (due to long rear axles) and longitudinal directions (due to longer wheelbase) than that available on the Standard W-6s etc..

Thanks for the quick reply!

The comment about the Farmall verus the W- series tractors is interesting.

My father owned a 1940's narrow fronted Farmall H, my maternal grandfather owned a 1944 W-4.

There was always discussion about which was the better design.

I liked the fenders (mudguards) on the W-4 and the lower centre of gravity made it FEEL more stable.

Probably a Farmall H with fenders and a wide front axle would have been the ideal mix of the two designs!

Regards from Michael H Australia

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Most of the neighbouring farms had W-6s. At the outbreak of war in 1939 my grandfather wanted to plow further up the terraces than had been possible with the 10-20 that had replaced the 6 horse teams in 1926. He was thinking of getting a T-20 but was persuaded by IHC to get the new farmall M which would be more useful around the farm and have virtually the lateral stability (with the wheels right out) of a T-20.

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The Framall M parts book show two different positions for the US made wide front axle...

post-8775-1208220082_thumb.jpg post-8775-1208220106_thumb.jpg

Interesting difference in the decals on these two tractors, by the way. I've seen other photos like the first one, with the "M" that slopes inward from both sides in both the "FARMALL" and "M" decals. But I can't remember ever seeing one of those in person.

Dean

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The long wheelbase versions of the wide front end take an acre and a half to turn around.

Short and long were the same axle, just with a plate to relocate the axle further back for the shorter turning radius.

According to my Super M and Super H manuals from 1952 and 1953 respectively, the tierod-in-front axle was still being used. However, my Dad's 1952 Super M has the newer style tierods-in-back IH front end.

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I hadn't noticed the different 'M's but I was only 4 when the first tractor was replaced and I cannot ask my father either. There are a lot of things, that in hindsight, that I should have found out while I still had the chance. I do not know the serial numbers of either tractor, I say 1940 but that is when it was delivered in New Zealand and I do not know how long things took to get here. There are at least 3 of the first 20 W-6s produced in NZ.

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If one looks in the book "International Harvester Photographic History" by Lee Klancher on page 130 there is a photograph of an early Farmall A where the M in the word Farmall has sloping sides. Similarly on page 151 there is a photograph of an early Farmall H showing the same letter M. Most of the other photographs show the Farmall name badge on the front of the grill has the sloping sides to the M.

I also note that in "International Harvester Experimental and Prototype Tractors" by Guy Fay that on page 97 there is a photograph of the protype Farmall 3-F that shows a name below the fuel tank with the sloping side M in the word Farmall. On page 103 there are photographs of the F-10 and 1-F that also have the Farmall decal with the sloping side M.

I note that with, at least the early letter series Farmalls, the Farmall name plate in the front of the grill has the M with sloping sides.

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I do not know the serial numbers of either tractor, I say 1940 but that is when it was delivered in New Zealand and I do not know how long things took to get here. There are at least 3 of the first 20 W-6s produced in NZ.

Farmall M photographed Oct. 11. 1939

http://www.wisconsinhistory.org/whi/fullimage.asp?id=22804

Suggests the tractor in the first photo is a 1939 build

Regards from Michael H

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I do not know the serial numbers of either tractor, I say 1940 but that is when it was delivered in New Zealand and I do not know how long things took to get here. There are at least 3 of the first 20 W-6s produced in NZ.

Interesting comment about the W-6s.

There is always some confusion with low Serial Numbered W-6s in Australia.

There were American "Farmall Works" built W-6s imported from 1940 with serial numbers starting from WBK-501 etc.

There were, from 1948, Australian "Geelong" built W-6 Kerosene tractors ALSO with their serial numbers starting from WBK-501 etc.

The "AW-6" designation didn't begin until 1950

Having said that I don't know when exports of Australian built tractors to New Zealand began.

Those W-6s in New Zealand may well be US built of course!!!

Regards from Michael H

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The W-6s and WD-6s mentioned here were US built W-6s. I am not sure when the first Australian built tractors came to New Zealand, probably not until the 1950s with the A-554 etc. Most of the W-6s and Farmall Ms that came to NZ after about 1952 were British made BW-6, BWD-6, BM and BMD tractors. the other British tractors were the B-250 etc.

There was also the import of about 250 German IH DED-3 tractors in the mid 1950s and late in the 1950s and early 1960s about 51 of their replacements, the D-324 tractors were imported.

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Who was the manufacturer of the original wide front-ends? I understand that aftermarket wide front-ends were also available.

Thanks,

Mark

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Who was the manufacturer of the original wide front-ends? I understand that aftermarket wide front-ends were also available.

Thanks,

Mark

In the US there was a SCHWARTZ brand "aftermarket" Wide Front Axle made by Schwartz Manufacturing Company of Minnesota.

Regards from Michael H

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I think all the early wide-fronts were IH made. They started with the interchangeable wide-fronts with the F-12 as the earlier F-20 and F-30 had to have the whole front pedestal changed. With the F-12 and the later H, M and C Farmalls it was easy to swap from single front wheel in a fork to dual front wheels on a bolster to a wide-front end.

On the aspect of Australian made tractors coming to NZ the Case and Vintage Farm Machinery Club of NZ, http\\www.nzvintagemachinery.com has a mid 1950s manual for an Australian AOS-6 in its library but I am not aware of earlier Australian tractors coming here. As indicated earlier most IH tractors in the 1950s were British made with a few German and the French Farmall FCs.

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I do not know the serial numbers of either tractor, I say 1940 but that is when it was delivered in New Zealand and I do not know how long things took to get here. There are at least 3 of the first 20 W-6s produced in NZ.

Interesting comment about the W-6s.

There is always some confusion with low Serial Numbered W-6s in Australia.

There were American "Farmall Works" built W-6s imported from 1940 with serial numbers starting from WBK-501 etc.

There were, from 1948, Australian "Geelong" built W-6 Kerosene tractors ALSO with their serial numbers starting from WBK-501 etc.

The "AW-6" designation didn't begin until 1950

Having said that I don't know when exports of Australian built tractors to New Zealand began.

Those W-6s in New Zealand may well be US built of course!!!

Regards from Michael H

.....Michael H...it is very easy to differentiate between US built and Australian built "W" series tractors.....the rear wheel centre/"hubs" on the Aussie ones were made from very heavy solid cast...as were the E27N Fordsons from that era.....then once the AW6 arrived on the scene...there were a multitude of differences..

Re the wide fronts for H and M's etc...apart from the dimensions of that "mounting plate"...which goes under the front end for the WF's..the IH axles are identical...(I imagine the after market ones are also identical...).....I have three such axles...all have IH markings on...all have the pitman arm (?) tie rod assembly etc out the front....unlike the later BM's ....

Mike

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Thanks Mike. I had forgotten about the unusual rear wheels on the Australian built Farmalls. The first of these that I saw was in the museum in Dalby on the Darling Downs and later quite a few others as roadside relics in various parts of NSW. I also think that some of these wheels appeared on earlier US built tractors that were later converted from their original steel wheels to pneumatic tyred wheels. I have no recollection of ever seeing these wheels in NZ.

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On the aspect of Australian made tractors coming to NZ the Case and Vintage Farm Machinery Club of NZ, http\\www.nzvintagemachinery.com has a mid 1950s manual for an Australian AOS-6 in its library but I am not aware of earlier Australian tractors coming here. As indicated earlier most IH tractors in the 1950s were British made with a few German and the French Farmall FCs.

I appears that the Aussie AW-7 range was available in New Zealand-

From the NZ "Country, Farm & Garden" website, with classic tractors photographed in New Zealand.

http://www.cfgphoto.com/img6937.htm

Regards from Michael H

P.S. The above mentioned website has a gallery of old tractors, of all brands, from New Zealand.

http://www.cfgphoto.com/photos-tractors.html

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Thanks for the information about the AW-7. Here is a few photos of the the wheels seen on an Australian Farmall H (US built) at the Village Museum in Caboolture, Queensland.

A Farmall M seen on the roadside in Northern New South Wales

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Here is an Australian buillt A-514 at the Case and Vintage Farm Machinery Club's (NZ) play day at Aylesbury in Canterbury, New Zealand. This shows an Australian wide front end.

Also an example of an AW-7 at the same play day. I had the pleasure of being asked to drive this tractor to Alyesbury.

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o121937...they certainly look similiar , don't they ...??? :):):)

(...Motueka Valley....about late 60's :):) )

....good pics from South....I have yet to either of those Australian built tractors, in the flesh..(so to speak )..even the venerable 554 seems to getting a mite scarce.....

Mike

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post-8775-1209816695_thumb.jpg post-8775-1209816719_thumb.jpg

....good pics from South....I have yet to either of those Australian built tractors, in the flesh..(so to speak )..even the venerable 554 seems to getting a mite scarce.....

Mike

Wow, very interesting. I don't know anything about the Australian built tractors, and am not sure I've even heard of the A-514 or 554 before. What's their history? How are they different from similar US-built models? The A-514 in the photo looks like a Super M with steel hydraulic lines. Is that the hydraulic control lever up by the throttle lever? And it looks like there's something mounted on the side of the front gas tank support, just below the sheet metal--is that the voltage regulator? No lights...were those options? A tractor like that at a show in the US would sure draw some attention.

Dean

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Dean.....the A554 ...(in my previous post ) was the "W" or standard version of the A514...you will notice the grills are the same....just like the American 560's etc grill..

I assume the AW7 preceeded the A554...

....the engines were Australian built, direct start.... 264 cubic inch diesels...exactly the same as the British engines...except the Australian ones had the CAV DPA injection pump...and had there own built in "bastardtostart" factor..... :(:(

There were 358 A554's imported into New Zealand..and 73 A514's....Mine (A554 ) was the last one sold in NZ...it had "hung around " awhile, at the IHC dealership in Blenhiem, in the South Island...but being a IH bloke...I got it....(we had a lot of IH equipment in those halcyon days of cheap diesel and no socialist government ...and realistic farm commodity prices:) :):) )

...and you were correct re the similiar lines to the Farmall M..in respect of the A514.....their light were on that simple "cross bar " postioned just below the steering wheel....

Mike

...I could stand corrected here...but I believe one of our esteemed but taciturn( :rolleyes::rolleyes: ) RP members from Michigan, has imported the odd Australian tractor....including the A514....

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Dean.....the A554 ...(in my previous post ) was the "W" or standard version of the A514...

...I could stand corrected here...but I believe one of our esteemed but taciturn( :rolleyes::rolleyes: ) RP members from Michigan, has imported the odd Australian tractor....including the A514....

Thanks, Mike. I'd really enjoy seeing one of those tractors in person someday. I still love the absolutely plain-Jane common-as-nails tractors, but when I go to tractor shows the best part is finding the little things that make them different from each other: farmer customizations, factory options, scars of use, etc. Seeing the Australian tractors and being able to compare and contrast them to the American versions would just be great fun.

Dean

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I made a comment earler that some of the early WD-6s came to New Zealand. Gere is a photograph of WDBK517 taken at our Clubs Swap Meet and Play Day last November.

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Hi. here is a photograph taken at the Waipara Vintage Festival in September 2007. This is a US built Farmall H with the wide front end of a British built Farmall BM. The second photograph show some of the competition with a couple of Clydesdales.

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