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M Diesel

1964 Loadstar 1600

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Need help and any advice that happens to come along. :)

Am thinking about buying a Loadstar 1600. A 1964 model. 345 gas, 16 foot bed with a scissor lift. Don't have pics or even much of a description other than it runs fine but the brake lines are failing, whatever that means. Maybe his ex doesn't like him or something.

He isn't asking much, but it may be a pig in a poke and I need info from people who know about these things. It would never see heavy duty, only light work around the farm. Was wondering what the typical GVW might be, what the rear end gears might be, stuff like that. It's pretty much a plain Jane model what what I hear. I don't know beans about a Loadstar other than having seen them. I figure it ain't no rocket and it most likely propels itself forward by grabbing on to the next available gas pump and pulling real hard, but it could be very suitable for our modest needs. Any help? The good? The bad?

Thanks

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I would take it for a test drive. The steering boxes on some of these get real worn out. We have had a new 1600 long ago. It had a 345 with a 5 and 2 transmission. They do like gas. They are good trucks overall but do like anything else get worn out. Are the brake lines rusting out? Does happen here, but I would hope in the desert enviornment you would not have the salt on the roads we do. Are any of the wheels leaking oil? Running trucks like these bring less than $ 1000 where I am.

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M Diesel--

We've got a '63 1600 with a V-304---4 speed w/2 speed rear end. Am thinking GVW is 18,000 or so-----but has hauled a helluva lot more. With the 345----you probably have a 5 speed (and hope you get a 2 speed rear end with it).

Quit running ours because of the brakes-----but they are good trucks. Still plenty of parts around through the salvage yards. With the 345---this truck may have a heavier GVW rating. You never know what they are until you take a look.

I agree with the other post----$500 to $1,000 ought to cover it. I actually saw some runners sell in farm auctions for $300---$350 last year with dump beds attached.

Check the tires out closely---------can run into a major expense real quick. Good luck

Delta Dirt

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Need help and any advice that happens to come along. :)

Am thinking about buying a Loadstar 1600. A 1964 model. 345 gas, 16 foot bed with a scissor lift. Any help? The good? The bad?

Thanks

Mdiesel., as you might have guessed, I have a Loadstar 1600. Thats it in my avatar. Since 1984 actually and its been a great truck. Its a 304 with 4speed trans, two speed axle. Typical gvw for the 1600 is right around the 20,000 pound mark depending on spring and axle options. It will tell you right on the inside driver door panel along with all the other specs. Of course like most farm grain trucks they will haul well over their rated gvw without a problem.

Rear axle ratio is something in the 6:1 range, I'd have to check the options list on mine to be sure. 50 mph is a comfortable speed. 60 starts to sound like the engine is turning a bit fast for my likings but it will do it and probably more.

Gas mileage is not too bad considering what it hauls. I used to figure to average 8 mpg and thats combined running empty home and hauling close to 20,000 pounds of grain to town. That was a few years back so I don't know what it might do on today's gas..

The worst I have saved til last. The brakes can be an expensive fix and I've probably spent quite a bit over the years until I finally got good working brakes. Vacuum booster, wheel cylinders, shoes, master cylinder, pretty well everything except some of the steel lines. But once you have them fixed it is a good strong brake system, especially if your not going to load it heavy .

The Loadstar is also a surprisingly smooth riding truck in spite of the heavy gvw rating. Those old IH trucks from the fifties running empty rode pretty hard on rough ground but the Loadstar somehow rides smoother.

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Thanks guys, you're the best! :)

Well this one won't see the desert, it's located in central Missouri and won't travel far to find it's new home if that actually happens. He wants $500 so it's not like there is a lot to lose, but after reading about all the brake issues in the 2 ton thread it makes you wonder what you are in for. (It's not like I don't have enough old IH gear with "problems". :lol: ) Wish I had time to look around more for other units but I don't get to visit the home place very often so this is a bit of a "make do" situation. (A dump bed is sorely needed.) The truck is along the way between the airport (Kansas City) and the farm so I get to stop by and do the inspecting and perhaps the all important "check writing". It will probably sit for a spell until I can coax a brother into slepping it to the farm place. :lol:

Interesting about the brake lines rusting out. Hadn't really thought about that as I don't have to deal with wet stuff much anymore. Kinda figured it was just age related. Will be sure to look at the steering box too, and thanks for the reminder on tires. Them has to be spendy. What size are the rims?

Are the tandem axle rigs in the 30K GVW range? Would be cool to be able to haul the TD9.

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Got some more info today. 5 speed with two speed rear, although the rear doesn't shift. He thinks its the cable.

Brake line problems are in the front. Rears are supposed to be okay. Has good tires. Working on a picture or two. :)

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Got some more info today. 5 speed with two speed rear, although the rear doesn't shift. He thinks its the cable.

Mine has an ongoing problem on occasion the two speed will not shift. Usually first thing in the morning and then its ok for the rest of the day. My fix? With the truck parked and idling I move the axle shift button up :P , quickly jump out and use a hammer handle, wrench, whatever to give the two speed motor a tap and I'll hear the shift happen. This is an Eaton two speed and I guess it has a weak spot in the armature of the little electric motor that does the shift. I had a repair kit put in years ago but it didn't seem to cure it for long. Its not a big deal though. Nothing I can't live with.

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Got some more info today. 5 speed with two speed rear, although the rear doesn't shift. He thinks its the cable.

Mine has an ongoing problem on occasion the two speed will not shift. Usually first thing in the morning and then its ok for the rest of the day. My fix? With the truck parked and idling I move the axle shift button up :P , quickly jump out and use a hammer handle, wrench, whatever to give the two speed motor a tap and I'll hear the shift happen. This is an Eaton two speed and I guess it has a weak spot in the armature of the little electric motor that does the shift. I had a repair kit put in years ago but it didn't seem to cure it for long. Its not a big deal though. Nothing I can't live with.

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Thanks! I remembered that from somewhere on here but it was kinda vague. Where is the shift motor if I may ask? Being a split rear, what is the shift pattern?

May have to change my signature.

"If you rear end doesn't split, your only half a**ed..."

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Front brake line problems are probably in the rubber hoses between the frame and the wheels. Over time they do tend to go bad.

Tires are most likely 8.25X20, 9.00X20, 10.00X20, or rarely 11.00X20 unless they are tubeless. If they are tubeless they will be equivalent sizes.

Don't let the discussion about brakes on the 2 ton truck thread scare you off. Our hydraulic braked buses could put you through the windshield faster than the air braked buses.

The big problem with the hydraulic brakes is they are most usually smaller in braking area and prone to a lot more brake fade because they have a smaller braking area. Hydraulic brakes also do not usually have spring brakes for emergency brakes. They most usually have a driveline emergency brake, which will not hold nearly as well as spring brakes.

Loadstar two axle trucks had GVWR's starting about 16K and went up from there. The size of the axles and brakes, the size of the tires, the size of the power package, etc. all worked together to determine the GVWR. Increasing any combination of those variables can increase the carrying capacity. I also think that IHC made their GVWR's very conservative.

Three axle trucks usually have GVWR's of 32K lbs. or more.

If he is asking $500.00, it is worth that much in spare parts and scrap iron. I am thinking the hoist and associated plumbing and pump is worth more than $500.00 alone.

If it starts up and runs, give him the $$$ and drive it home.

Mark O.

Castle Rock, WA

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The shift motor is on the differential. You will find it on the front side left of the driveshaft. It is just what they call a two speed rear end. You have a high and low range. With the 5 speed, you realy won't miss it if the rear end doesn't shift. Depends sort of on what range it is stuck in I suppose. This truck likely weighs over 8000 lbs empty, so there will always be good scrap value if you don't like it. IH made these trucks for over 10 years. They have a good reputation.

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Figured it to be in the diff, but thought it might have been frame mounted. I was confused a bit by the "cable" statement. On the good side, I've managed to work some two speeds before. Just not these ones. :lol: I have unfond memories of some Chevy tilt beds from the teenage years. Don't know if it was me or the explanation I was given but I have to admit me and them didn't get along well. Only thing in my whole life I ever had trouble shifting. (Not like I spent a lot of time at it though.) This one is thought to stuck in high which is just fine for now. Does the 5 speed have a different gear set or just a granny low added?

As to that whole ordeal about hydraulic vs air, it doesn't bother me. Funny what some people get tangled up about. Newer brakes would be fine, but as Popeye says they yam what they yam.

So what is the shift pattern anyway? Somehow I don't expect a RoadRanger.

Forgot about the drive line parking brake. Haven't seen one of those in a long time! :o

All this stuff sure makes me feel a lot better about showing up on his door step. :)

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Well here goes trying to explain a shift pattern without a picture. Start out on top left. There is first gear. Stay on the top side and move over to the right. There is second gear. Straight down from there is third gear. Go to the top again and move to the right and there is fourth. Straight down from there is fifth. Oh yea, reverse is straight down from first. You will feel a spring when you bring the shifter to the far left. You have first and reverse when against the spring. Your old Chevy experiance may have been a vacuum operated two speed. The Loadstar will likely have a electric. The vacuum type do use a cable. Depending on the truck, Fifth gear is likey direct. Could have been a overdrive option but probaly not on a 1600. The shift pattern is different on the overdrive. If yours is as I attempted to decribe, it would be direct. Our truck was a 1975 model. The salesman said this transmission had a "working fourth gear" what ever that meant I don't know. We owned the truck along with some realation that always brought the truck back to us out of gas, no matter if it had a half tank in it when they got it from us. We returned the favor by coming back home from hauling hogs 60 miles by using fourth gear high range. You could watch the gas gauge move as you drove. Well not really, but it did burn a lot more that way. Never did try to see what mileage we got. Does yours have power steering?

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The two speed is an electric shift-----check for juice at all of your terminals (could be only a fuse). If not----

Try cleaning the slide switch on the button----have had them dirty and not make the connection. Also----its no big deal to take a part the screw to which the motor is mounted to on the rear end. Sometimes a little cleaning and light grease will get it back to going-----and sometimes the motor and shifting assembly just has to be replaced. Had to replace one my F700 a couple of years ago and it was $200+ (don't remember for sure----can buy at most reliable parts stores), but worth it to be able to utilize the two speed.

Split shifting the two speed will result in a "po-man's" 10 speed----and give you much more truck without lugging back your engine so much. Keep the rpms wound up on those engines and they will run forever.

In regards to the "working 4th gear"-----you may have it, or may not. But my F700 goes 1L---1H; 2l---2H; 3L---3H; 4L---5L; 4H---5H. Resulting in a set of real "close step" shift ratios at higway speeds. Think you will find this set up primarily in the Clark transmissions----where the gears could be swapped to result in this shift senario. Whatever you've got-----you will figure it out once you get your two speed to shifting. (just listen to your rpms)

Sounds like you are on the right track------Good luck.

Delta Dirt

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The only difference between in the gear ratios in the 4-speed and the 5-speed is in the 5-speed you get one more gear between low gear and high. If it has OD, 4th is direct and the same ratio as high gear in the 4-speed. Granny low and the normal first gear are usually pretty close to the same as well.

Depending on the gears in the transmission of the 5-speed, the big jump will be between 2nd and 3rd or 3rd and 4th. The 2-speed really helps with the big jumps.

On some of our 2-speeds the seal between the shift motor and the rear end would leak over time. Eventually, so much gear lube would get into the shift motor and linkage that the electric motor just wouldn't have enough strength to move the linkage to shift the gears.

Most 2-speeds, particularly when hooked up with a 5-speed, just aren't worth the effort to shift most of the time. The only time I really wanted one was when I was climbing a grade with a load. Having that extra half gear in between was really helpful, particularly on the big jump shift.

Mark O.

Castle Rock, WA

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They actually made the Loadstar from 1962 to 1978. I have a 78 with a massive steel dump bed and I wouldn't take anything for it. It has a 345 and 5 + 2 trans. I would give $500 in a heartbeat. Of course I have a psycological bias to Loadstars, I just love them. That goes for most anything IH. Mine has hydraulic brakes that will "put you through the windshield," as Mark O. said. Buy it man!!

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It's in the works. Of course asking on an IH board is a lot like asking your fellow lemmings if we should jump off the cliff. :lol:

Been thinking about the front lines. I need to get it home to work on it. Good part is there are few stop signs along the way, but it's a hundred miles or so. Is there a way to cap off the front lines? Or put a return back to the resevoir? (Me and duct tape have nursed home many a broken rig over the years)

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Hey Ralph, recognize the pose?

post-546-1195367193_thumb.jpg

Shes a full figured gal.

post-546-1195367215_thumb.jpg

Got the brakes working well enough to drive, had to pull the fuel tank to unplug the pickup tube, got it to run by spoon feeding it with a funnel, then it sipped from a jug, then full drinks from the re-installed fuel tank. Got the headlights to work, the tail lights and turn signals all brightened up, thought all was good until the clutch hydraulic line spewed. Oh well, it's nearly driveable. :lol:

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Hey Ralph, recognize the pose?

post-546-1195367193_thumb.jpg

Shes a full figured gal.

post-546-1195367215_thumb.jpg

Got the brakes working well enough to drive, had to pull the fuel tank to unplug the pickup tube, got it to run by spoon feeding it with a funnel, then it sipped from a jug, then full drinks from the re-installed fuel tank. Got the headlights to work, the tail lights and turn signals all brightened up, thought all was good until the clutch hydraulic line spewed. Oh well, it's nearly driveable. :lol:

That's a beauty!! Man what a deal!!! Congradulations.

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Hey Ralph, recognize the pose?

Got the brakes working well enough to drive, had to pull the fuel tank to unplug the pickup tube, got it to run by spoon feeding it with a funnel, then it sipped from a jug, then full drinks from the re-installed fuel tank. Got the headlights to work, the tail lights and turn signals all brightened up, thought all was good until the clutch hydraulic line spewed. Oh well, it's nearly driveable. :lol:

Good looking old Loadstar and appears fairly rust free from what I can see. I also notice your front springs must be good. When I got mine years ago there was hardly any space between the tops of the front tires and the fenders. The springs were flat or curved downwards when loaded. After re-arching and adding a leaf it made a world of difference and the truck sat way up where it should be.

Hydraulic clutch? Now thats different. I thought only the pickups had that. Mine is all manual linkage.

Good luck getting it back on the road. ^_^

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Here's its cousin from the Saskatchewan prairies. :P:P

post-202-1195485704_thumb.jpg

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Great old truck! Looks a lot better than my rusty old F#@$ F600!! I'm in the middle of doing my front brakes right now. $160.00 for the pads, $28.00 for each cylinder, $41.00 for front axle seals, new brake lines, etc., etc. It hurts, but I will never have to do them again!! In a big old truck moving is optional, stopping is not!!

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We have a 93 ford 700 with the lucas brakes;works similar to a air maxi pot. They are a spring brake using hyd pressure to release. Last time I checked the hyd cyl were something like $1200 EACH. I like how it works but they are pricey . I wish our 81 tandem binder had park brakes like that;almost have to carry a chunk of railway with it. Shouldhave bin on air

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Great old truck! Looks a lot better than my rusty old F#@$ F600!! I'm in the middle of doing my front brakes right now. $160.00 for the pads, $28.00 for each cylinder, $41.00 for front axle seals, new brake lines, etc., etc. It hurts, but I will never have to do them again!! In a big old truck moving is optional, stopping is not!!

Depends on how much you like being on the news. :rolleyes:

This one is going to require some serious brake parts as well. Doing our best to limit consumption, it still took about a gallon and a half of brake fluid to get it home. Many a KwikiMart gave their all in a 100 mile streak down Highway 63 in Central MO.

For $400 bucks there are no complaints. Motor is a bit ratty and many other details, but it runs. :) Underside is a bit crusty though. :lol: The power brake booster (under the cab below the drivers seat) has seen better days. It did an excellent job of killing the engine when the brakes were touched.

post-546-1197072941_thumb.jpg

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