Jump to content

td-9


pinesman

Recommended Posts

I have a td-9 that had been starting and running fine. I got busy with the farm and couldn't get on it since September. When I went to start it a couple weeks ago, it won't start. It has fire on the plugs, fresh gas, and I can definitely tell a difference in engine speed if I try to crank it on diesel. I did get it started on diesel with a squirt of ether and brought it back to my shop, but even after warming up it still will not start on gas. I thought the coil, points and condensor looked like they might have came on it originally so I replaced them. Still no go. The plugs are not wet when I pulled one. Should they be on this style engine? Cleaned the carb. Any suggestions?

Link to post
Share on other sites
I have a td-9 that had been starting and running fine. I got busy with the farm and couldn't get on it since September. When I went to start it a couple weeks ago, it won't start. It has fire on the plugs, fresh gas, and I can definitely tell a difference in engine speed if I try to crank it on diesel. I did get it started on diesel with a squirt of ether and brought it back to my shop, but even after warming up it still will not start on gas. I thought the coil, points and condensor looked like they might have came on it originally so I replaced them. Still no go. The plugs are not wet when I pulled one. Should they be on this style engine? Cleaned the carb. Any suggestions?

Anybody have any Ideas?

Link to post
Share on other sites
I have a td-9 that had been starting and running fine. I got busy with the farm and couldn't get on it since September. When I went to start it a couple weeks ago, it won't start. It has fire on the plugs, fresh gas, and I can definitely tell a difference in engine speed if I try to crank it on diesel. I did get it started on diesel with a squirt of ether and brought it back to my shop, but even after warming up it still will not start on gas. I thought the coil, points and condensor looked like they might have came on it originally so I replaced them. Still no go. The plugs are not wet when I pulled one. Should they be on this style engine? Cleaned the carb. Any suggestions?

Pinesman, I have a "spare 9" that I start from time to time & right now she won't start on gas either. It's a low priority right now so I won't be spending any time on it soon to see whats up, but the last time I played with it I took the small plug out that's kinda next to the choke & set my small adj. air nozzle in there with just a little air coming out just to see if I could splash some gas up while cranking. Sure enough it took right off but would die right away, so I just kept introducing more air till it ran long enough to switch it over. Interesting to note while it was running this way it was not missing or sputtering which kind of surprised me. This carb is a rebuild from F.P. Smith & ran from the get go with no problems when first installed, & had started maybe a dozen times after that. One day when I was getting to shutting her down she would not switch back to gas, that is when I left it & tried my "air induction method". I'm guessing like MagicMikey suggested somthing to do with the flipper thingy, I just have not tried yet. I have never checked to see if the plugs are wet under normal circumstances.

Good luck & keep us posted,

gilligan

Link to post
Share on other sites

Seasons Grettings Pinesman.

I know this may sound a bit out in left field but I recently had a real head scratcher with a 1947 TD9 that is new to me. If you go back a bit on this board you will find my post entitled something like " TD9 won't start. Seems like it is overfueling". I later followed up with "I found the culprit"

However, to make a long story short, my TD9 wouldn't start. We pull started it to load it when I brought it home. I then cleaned the carb and installed a new set of points and condenser in the mag. After trying just about everything that I could think of plus the suggestions of many who replied to my origional post, it still wouldn't start.

The problem was the new condenser. I put an old one back in and it has started every time since.

As for the flipper thingy; it is on a cross shaft between the intake manifold and the engine. It operates to close off the diesel side of the intake manifold and open the gasoline side. If it dosen't flip up far enough when you have the low compression lever in gas start position, the diesel side stays open and the engine can not draw fuel through the carb. As magic mickey said; captain crunch may have a pic or two.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Seasons Grettings Pinesman.

I know this may sound a bit out in left field but I recently had a real head scratcher with a 1947 TD9 that is new to me. If you go back a bit on this board you will find my post entitled something like " TD9 won't start. Seems like it is overfueling". I later followed up with "I found the culprit"

However, to make a long story short, my TD9 wouldn't start. We pull started it to load it when I brought it home. I then cleaned the carb and installed a new set of points and condenser in the mag. After trying just about everything that I could think of plus the suggestions of many who replied to my origional post, it still wouldn't start.

The problem was the new condenser. I put an old one back in and it has started every time since.

As for the flipper thingy; it is on a cross shaft between the intake manifold and the engine. It operates to close off the diesel side of the intake manifold and open the gasoline side. If it dosen't flip up far enough when you have the low compression lever in gas start position, the diesel side stays open and the engine can not draw fuel through the carb. As magic mickey said; captain crunch may have a pic or two.

Maybe I am wrong, but Tther plugs seem to be firing ok so I don't think it is the condensor. I had thought about the flipper thingy but There is a very definite difference when cranking on diesel side vs gas side. Could that be and still not allow gas to be drawn up from the carb? How/what do I do about the flipper thingy? Thanks.

Link to post
Share on other sites

You are right, the engine usually spins over much easier on "gas" than on "diesel" unless the rings are completely shot. However, when the decompression lever is down, the engine can be on the gas start mode and spinning over easy, but the flipper may not have flipped to allow the intake air to pass throgh the carb properly.

You can get to the flipper by reaching over the intake manifold. It is shaped a bit like this (>) with the point of the lazy V fastened to the cross shaft. If you have the hood off it is quite easy to see, while you are working the decompression lever, to determine if it is coming up far enough. If it isn't you can lift it by hand. Usually a little penetrating fluid will lubricate the shaft enough to get it working again.

You mentioned that the spark plugs are not wet when you check them. This indicates it may not be pulling fuel with the air. I took my plugs out once, while it was running on diesel, to see if the low compression valves were leaking and found the plugs to be damp. I just took it to be a normal part of the switch-over cycle. However, I'm usually not satisfied with assumption so I stopped the engine while on gas start mode a couple times and found them to be damp as well. This tells me these engines like a rich mixture when on gas mode.

One other thing. If you change from a mag to a distributor, keep in mind that the wire that leads from the front of the manifold to the mag is for grounding out the mag when running on diesel. As such it can not be attached to the distributor. You will need to run a power source to the dist. and remember to turn it off when running on diesel. Or, find a manifold the is for a distributor system. They both look similar at a glance but one will not work for the other.

My TD9 doesn't have the adjustment that gilligan refers to so I can't comment on that.

Keep scrath'n. You'll get there.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess it was thew flipper thingy. It was not turning the rod enough which goes through the intake manifold. A little pb blaster and all is well again. In fact with the new ignition parts I put on it, it started so fast it almost scared me. It is indeed a terrible thing when the flipper thingy doesn't work right. Thanks to all.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...