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IH Tractors on Montana Farm


Old Binder Guy

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On 12/9/2023 at 7:24 PM, Howard_P said:

Yes, that looks like an IH D-300/400/500 from the late 1930's, although there were others, particularly Whites, that had a similar profile.  And I think that would definitely be a WWII slogan.

 

D-400 Coke Truck.jpg

Howard_P Thanks for straightening that confusion out for me. I also think I remember that White similar to this one. I remember the D-30 cab on our truck as a boy had the same cab as our D-2 pickup. And, I know that same cab was used on the REO trucks back then too. A REO:

Reo_truck_x_ckjohn.jpg.8bb1036337fcb16e1bdca57f98594d8b.jpg

A D-model IHC truck, and I don't know if it's a D-30 or D-20? I'm not used to seeing them with Budd wheels. I'm more used to the Dayton wheels more heavily used back then on IH trucks.  Gary🤔

D-20orD-30IHCTruck.jpg.babd4d16254cf5de3b749b80bd2f02f3.jpg

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l know this don't have anything to do with IH tractors in Montana, but thought l'd post it anyway. A "one stack Mack with a shack on the back".

singlestackmackwithshackonback.thumb.jpg.126fb85414d1a917d23dc7adf6fd74d4.jpg

And l'm pretty sure l could qualify to drive this Mack.....

oldmanoldtruck.thumb.JPG.ddab7cc0fd08799ad2fb0c1996db56ca.JPG

And just for safety's sake, don't forget to use wheel chocks when you park your trailer......

WTFchocks.JPG.c61e86dbdd1cc67948c65f6e97f66754.JPG

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Here's some interesting Montana news. Looks like Amtrak might push through another North Coast Hiawatha, returning a southern passenger rail route to the state.

https://www.montanarightnow.com/montana/montana-receiving-500-000-for-north-coast-hiawatha-passenger-rail-development/article_2b41c4e4-9514-11ee-bcb3-d713e2365818.html

https://dailymontanan.com/2023/12/08/montana-passenger-rail-gets-15m-for-malta-infrastructure-southern-rail-planning/

https://kfgo.com/2023/12/12/943994/

Can't wait to see what comes of it. Any excuse to see more of Montana by rail is a good one!!

The North Coast Hi at the NP depot in Deer Lodge. The Milwaukee depot is on the left.

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The North Coast Hi pausing in Butte.

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Mike

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On 12/11/2023 at 12:29 AM, Old Binder Guy said:

I remember the D-30 cab on our truck as a boy had the same cab as our D-2 pickup. And, I know that same cab was used on the REO trucks back then too. A REO:

There was a company that made truck cabs for many brands including IH 

They were was based out of Chicago  

I don't recall their name 

They were acquired by IH in the late 60's I think  

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6 hours ago, Absent Minded Farmer said:

Here's some interesting Montana news. Looks like Amtrak might push through another North Coast Hiawatha, returning a southern passenger rail route to the state.

https://www.montanarightnow.com/montana/montana-receiving-500-000-for-north-coast-hiawatha-passenger-rail-development/article_2b41c4e4-9514-11ee-bcb3-d713e2365818.html

https://dailymontanan.com/2023/12/08/montana-passenger-rail-gets-15m-for-malta-infrastructure-southern-rail-planning/

https://kfgo.com/2023/12/12/943994/

Can't wait to see what comes of it. Any excuse to see more of Montana by rail is a good one!!

The North Coast Hi at the NP depot in Deer Lodge. The Milwaukee depot is on the left.

image.thumb.jpeg.fb36fdabbf985c6cebbd0b1305b649e5.jpeg

The North Coast Hi pausing in Butte.

image.jpeg.af51ad3b35d6eefb7e120f1f6c8cfcb4.jpeg

Mike

The Milwaukee Road had the one that comes to my mind 

image.png.566679f991e071972c8518aecd53427c.png

image.png.9278698fc8b7a6bbdff957291b4b0dbc.png

 

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On 12/14/2023 at 4:26 AM, jeeper61 said:

The Milwaukee Road had the one that comes to my mind 

image.png.566679f991e071972c8518aecd53427c.png

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jeeper61, I remember Dad showing me a Milwaukee Railroad Hiwatha streamliner steam locomotive when I was a very little boy. I don't remember if it was one of these "new" models or an old model? It was sure impressive though! I don't remember where we were when he showed it to me.

MilwaukeeHiwathastreamlinersteamlocomotiveatdepot.thumb.jpg.16a415da21c829f782979d65072ddee0.jpg

This was the earlier model of the Hiwatha taking on water. I feel so very blessed to grow up on the last decade the Milwaukee Railroad operated steam locomotive on our Jawbone Railroad between Harlowton and Lewistown. I never saw a Hiwatha on our Buttermilk Curve, but plenty of the smaller engines.

HiawathaMIlwaukeesteamlocomotivetakingonwateratNewLisbonWisconsin.jpg.8b9567b320cb9e2b49927e31974aa292.jpg

I'm sure I recently posted this photo of Milwaukee steam locomotive #1028 on Buttermilk Curve pulling the morning Lewistown passenger train from Harlowton. It generally rounded Buttermilk Curve about 8:45 to 9:AM, which made dodging it driving to Glengarry one room school. I had to be on my toes. One morning the train was about in this same spot (Uncle Charley Yaeger's land on both sides of the track, our property fence was one in the same between our farms.) and I was driving Dad's quite new 1953 Jeep Pickup to school. I saw the train coming and wouldn't you know I was almost atop the railroad crossing, on our farm lane, when the engine stopped. I had the forethought to push in on the clutch and the Jeep rolled backward to a safe distance. Dad was standing in the dining room watching me (which he often did) and panicked. He got in his Studebaker Champion and drove up to where I was after the train had passed. He took me to school. We later found out a main bearing half slipped and tried to piggy back the other half bearing, locking the engine. (I was tickled pink to get this photo from a Milwaukee RR buff who posted it on Facebook, and his dad was engineer of #1028 this morning.) I have no idea who took the photo, but they were on the county road that paralled the railroad.

Milwaukeesteamlocomotive1028approachingCharleyJamesYaegersranchonButtermilkCurve9AMfromHarlowtontoLewistownmorningpassentertrain.jpg.386b4598c3402c20417abf7b8459389d.jpg

About three miles west, this locomotive above was this Milwaukee locomotive #8148 switching grain cars during harvest at Joan, Montana. I know I've posted this photo before! It always reminds me of when I was a 7th grader. We Glengarry school kids had to each write a letter to a Lewistown business in our "penmanship class", requesting a tour by our school of their facility. We did Radio Station KXLO, The Lewistown Daily News, the Lewistown and the Fergus County Creameries, Eddy's Bakery, The Lewistown Fire Department, Police Department, Fergus County Courthouse, Sheriff's Office and Jail, plus the Milwaukee Railroad Depot! (I probably missed a business or two?) I had no idea what would be shown to us at the Milwaukee Roundhouse facility.

LocomotiveMilwaukeeRR8148atJoanMontanalikeoneIengineeredin1954imp.thumb.jpg.6e6496444ae554dc651c60c5a187d86b.jpg

The Lewistown Milwaukee Railroad Roundhouse, watering tank, coal facility, and shops south of town on Spring Creek. When our school arrived, an engineer had a locomotive like above fired up waiting for us. We may have had 8 or 9 kids in school then. We all fit inside the cab and a safe distance from the "hot" of the boiler. Because I was the biggest kid in school, I was chosen to "help" the engineer. He moved and let me pull the Johnson Bar backward. Then he put my left hand on the throttle lever, guiding my hand, opening the throttle. He already had the cylinder cocks opened while he waited. It blew steam out of one cylinder, then the opposite cylinder for a short ways, then we backed down the tracks likely about three blocks. Then we closed the throttle. He moved and I pushed the Johnson Bar forward. Then we opened the throttle slightly, heading back to the roundhouse. Then we closed the throttle near the roundhouse.

LewistownMontanasMilwaukeeRailroadRRRoundhousefacilitysouthoftownonSpringCreekElaineWorthy.jpg.a6842e194e23c6c57dd7957e1290f15e.jpg

No this wasn't a result of MY doing. An early "D-Valve" Milwaukee Mallet Compound engine punched a hole in the Lewistown Roundhouse. This Mallet ran on the Great Falls Milwaukee Railroad run, not on our Harlowton spur.

LocomotivethroughtheMilwaukeeRRRoundhouseinLewistownTed.jpg.15ec88dd19ac045abb0aa40b4c8e9375.jpg

That Johnson Bar is quite a piece of equipment. It allows the valves to add steam to the rear cylinders to make it either go forward or reverse. (The live steam cylinder then exhausts the steam to the huge front cylinders re-using the lower pressure [cooler] steam. Then they exhaust up the smokestack.) I'm wondering if the "hostler" or whoever was at the throttle of this Mallet checked the direction of the Johnson Bar? Forward, it goes forward. Rearward, it goes rearward. But check the position BEFORE you open the throttle.

steamlocomotivethroughwalloftheMilwaukeeRRRoundhousenearLewistownMontanaTed.jpg.855982207d374b7f26f33fa27427685a.jpg

This is a photo of a larger Milwaukee Railroad steam locomotive (I believe #931) at the Milwaukee Depot in downtown, Lewistown. It must have been a faster locomotive for passenger service to Great Falls?

LewistownsteamlocomotiveattheMilwaukeeDepotonMainStreetLarryHoffman.thumb.jpg.b9d9ad10ad0b0bac1df1ea67ac84723c.jpg

This is Milwaukee locomotive #2027 parked alongside the original Jawbone Railroad depot south of the Milwaukee Depot and north of the Milwaukee Roundhouse. Note the snow plow at left and the ancient caboose at right. The street in front of the locomotive is Brassey Street. At the far end, behind the trees still stands the 1880 Reeds Fort log Post Office. That was Grandpa Frank Jäger's first post office or mailing address when he went to the place on Beaver Creek that he homesteaded.

LewistownJawbone2027atdepotonBrasseyStimp.thumb.jpg.fb008b675a31254c1abe31fde84d3a9b.jpg

A little more than a year later, near 1882, Edward Brassey had become the postmaster of the Brassey Post Office. It was about three miles above Grandpa's homestead. Reeds Fort was about 9 miles horseback. Brassey in about 1885 moved his law practice to Lewistown and Reeds Fort became enveloped by Lewistown. A sawmill was built at Brassey about this same time, and Grandpa got much of his lumber for his homestead from it. Brassey eventually had a school, and a store too. One of Dad's much older second cousins went to that school. Early building Grandpa built were log. His cabin and his cow barn were two of them. Dad was their 7th child and the last one born in the cabin. The rest were born in his and Grandma's new house built in 1900, with the exception of two. One born on a haystack in July when Grandma was helping Grandpa. She delivered on the haystack, wrapped the baby in her apron, got off of the stack and took him to the house. And she had another born in mid August when Grandma was shocking Grain. This photo shows much of the lumber Grandpa bought at Brassey Sawmill. The house is under construction in this 1900 photo. The cabin Dad was born in is in the distance off of the front porch.

FrankYaeger1900houseCabin-homestead.thumb.jpg.8f7461ad8acd84ef4f9738bce8a968b6.jpg

This was Grandpa's homestead ca. 1918, as his 30-60 round radiator Aultman-Taylor gas tractor is backed up to a shed at right. Buttermilk Curve is old business in this photo. The Jawbone built Buttermilk Curve in July of 1903. The curve got that name from Grandma Yaeger. She had ancient (1200 AD) Italian roots in her Andermatt, Switzerland family "over the Alps" from Northern Italy. She spoke Swiss German, Italian and Romansche - a blend, I think. She could communicate with the Italian Jawbone construction workers and took them cool buttermilk each July afternoon they were building the horseshoe loop around the ranch homestead. The Jawbone Railroad named the curve for her. The railroad is in the distance, heading downhill, upstream. A small bridge crossed it over Beaver Creek. Then the railroad this side of the bridge is inside the near fences. It headed uphill downstream, eliminating the need for a long trestle. They'd added onto their house (that burned in 1926) and Grandpa built the new horse barn in 1917. He died in 1920. He'd gone to the outhouse and grandma found him lying on the ground.

PHOTO01542FrankAJger-Yaegershomesteadca1920GlengarryMontana.thumb.jpg.47b216194357eba09c4c31434af43c80.jpg

This lousy Newspaper photo was taken from atop the Beaver Creek Hill in the distance, showing most of Buttermilk Curve except the Beaver Creek Railroad bridge. Taken atop Beaver Creek Hill.

CookeReynoldsphotoofYaegerRanchcropca1918ButtermilkCurve_edited-1.thumb.jpg.f704d437ffe19c00f77e17a734af68aa.jpg

Now that I've created all of these "bunny trails," this is a ca. 1909 picture of a Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Puget steam locomotive heading toward Harlowton, out of Lewistown via Buttermilk Curve a few miles away. 

LewistownCMStPPugetsteamlocomotiveca1909.jpg.90cff640bac62c7f34c34f4773772a5a.jpg

A locomotive pulling passenger cars is headed out of Lewistown for Buttermilk Curve and Harlowton on the Milwaukee Railroad. I believe the Milwaukee bought the Jawbone in about 1908? This locomotive has piston valves, so may be later?

AMilwaukeeRailroadsteamlocomotiveandpassengercarsnearMainStreetinLewistownMontanaJerryHanley.thumb.jpg.c28e929375b4332b113c6f6758557dea.jpg

After the Milwaukee trains left Lewistown, the cuts on Buttermilk Curve's upper RR cuts caused this appearance on their locomotives by the time they stopped their first passenger stop of Moore, Montana. My late father in-law Lynn Simpson gave me this photo of the snow covered locomotive at my high school town in 1917. 

MilwLocoMoore1917snowstorm.thumb.jpg.513d11a6d7c3ea2313744e3d0cccdfda.jpg

This was the Moore Milwaukee Depot ca. 1909. The Model T Ford "Tourster" minus a windshield, and with an early radiator, it had to be likely built in late 1908?

MooreDepotModelTJawbone--.jpg.20ef562c0dd49f17375cbf5468eb6c55.jpg

Inside the Moore Depot 1910, L.M. 'Pappy' Dyer Agent inside shot. I remember seeing Pappy Dyer with his pipe, pie cap and a cane walking the sidewalk when I started high school at Moore in the fall of 1957 as a VERY old man.

MooreDepot1910LMPappyDyerAgent.thumb.jpg.fc3dd2ab8fcb044525e4c6b64143dfa7.jpg

Another photo of the first grain elevator built on the Milwaukee Railroad in Montana The Montana Elevator on the left. Now, a modern 102 car loading facility is near this standing elevator. I've hauled a lot of grain to it prior to 1980. A Minneapolis steam engine, threshing machine, cook car and like sleeping quarters for the crew are stopped at the main line, as an early Jawbone "teakettle" locomotive takes on water at the Moore water tank tower. Judging by the steam traction engine it could be around 1905? Would the Minneapolis have had flat strap spokes by then, Roger? I can't tell what that far steam traction engine is with the front head water tank, pulling a threshing machine?

MinneapolisenginethresherandcookcarattheMontanaElevatorMoore1910IMARP.jpg.e5743e15032fec78016ddd030a0e404c.jpg

Maybe I've rambled about my steam memories and steam life on the Milwaukee "Jawbone" Railroad, long enough? Gary😉

PS: Aw heck, why not put on a photo of Otto Briese (pronounced "Breezy," and he was breezy! ) and his helper Jim Mundy at the Greeley Elevator in Moore. Jim's Dad, George Mundy was my band teacher at Moore High School for my freshman and sophomore years.

OttoBrieseandJimMundyatGreeleyElevatorinMooreMontanaimp.thumb.jpg.d02b2d24d83841fb610c74bc6303ed72.jpg

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On 12/13/2023 at 7:24 PM, twostepn2001 said:

l know this don't have anything to do with IH tractors in Montana, but thought l'd post it anyway. A "one stack Mack with a shack on the back".

singlestackmackwithshackonback.thumb.jpg.126fb85414d1a917d23dc7adf6fd74d4.jpg

And l'm pretty sure l could qualify to drive this Mack.....

oldmanoldtruck.thumb.JPG.ddab7cc0fd08799ad2fb0c1996db56ca.JPG

And just for safety's sake, don't forget to use wheel chocks when you park your trailer......

WTFchocks.JPG.c61e86dbdd1cc67948c65f6e97f66754.JPG

So that's where they go!!

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4 hours ago, iowaboy1965 said:

Ramble all you want Gary. I love reading the history of the photos and the local tie ins of the time. No one else could give us that info and insight. Ty

iowaboy1965, Thank you. I hadn't looked at it that way. I do know I'm a "dying breed" though. As an antique buff, I've loved American History, Wheat Country History, Montana History and the local stuff. I'm incurable. And I still love playing with our history! Gary😁😁😁

Gary Me Selfie, 15 hp Case 9-17-2022.JPG

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Tom Railsback, AKA: Tubacase47. I'm so afraid we aren't going to make it to 1,000 pages by the end of the year. Hopefully we'll be around to get it though. Likely some time before my 81st birthday!

Should I be forgetful enough to wish you all (all ya'all) a Merry Christmas, as things slip my mind now and then, Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year from Old Binder Guy, AKA: OBG, AKA: Gary😉

Tubacase47 a few moons ago.

Tubacase47andhistubaatSilverCreek8-21-14.thumb.jpg.a6f1084a6a7a135f03b83d9345b6f95c.jpg

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3 hours ago, TroyDairy said:

Merry Christmas to you and your family as well Mr Yeager

Thanks for the history stuff.  Make me sitnand be quiet and realize often how easy we have things today.

TroyDairy, I so agree with you. We do have things so easy now compared to our ancestors who tamed this country and made it productive. I wasn't aware of it, but I think that's the reason I'm so fascinated with tools and equipment of the past, to understand where those hard working people came from and what they accomplished in their lifetimes. My dad was a working fool. But without realizing it, I think he pushed me for my love of history and operation of older equipment. When I was 10 and I bought my first car, this 1926 Model T "jalopy," Dad proudly drove it home for me, as I didn't know how to shift it yet. The next day I was out in the pasture though!

1926ModelTCoupeGarys1953IvarSandorig.jpg.25ebb483fb52a55490b5ab4a82aa842f.jpg

I restored the coupe with pride always remembering Dad's enthusiasm for it. And the 1925 Model TT Truck I bought at age 11.

1925ModelTT1926ModelTinKalispellred.thumb.jpg.8cabb9c748175fc3c6b4e15230e3136f.jpg

Also at age eleven, I fired the 20-70 Nichols & Shepard on our place. Dad stands at right with a proud look on his face. I'd fired it in the Fall of 1954 at Tyler's, when Dad traded for this engine.

MeGaryMikeTyleron20-70NicholsShepard1955BillandJoeYaeger.jpg.a2f8ee65ffb922f31f81a929f9caa74e.jpg

I so wish I'd been more thankful for my dad. I plan to see him again someday. I know he'll be so proud of the 650+ accordion songs I've learned by ear and recorded. But when he mentions 1980 and what happened to the farm with me at the helm, I may make a run for it? I still can't believe operating interest rates were from 19.5% to 21%. I'd doubled size of the farmland but borrowed for the necessary equipment to farm it. I now have 20/20 hindsight. I guess the old saying, "The bigger they are, the harder they fall" must have been at work then? I do have good memories of the equipment I was using at that time, most of it IH. Gary😔

IH456855chiselplow-2.jpg.5ee9db45afc08e9c05815005709d4d25.jpgTD-18A181MIkeShelldozerIH.jpg.05e3d95f27300487e2464d53ac2515cc.jpgIH1256insnowclothes.jpg.e4b2040e515761c5c48df38302cfd10b.jpg760MasseyFerguson1980meGary.thumb.jpg.65701488b5d25943caceb1938d96a518.jpg

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The photo of me with the tuba had to have been taken at least 3 years ago because I'm standing in front of my Ford Escape and holding my circa 1900 vintage BBb tuba.  I traded the Escape for my Expedition in September 2020.

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Professor. I saw a bunch of lanterns hanging in the barn and maybe you can enlighten me about this kerosene lamp I found going thru a bunch of stuff I have. Can remember where or when I got it. Dietz  Bestov hand Lamp. I electrified it many years ago. Don't know weather I will stump the star!

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2 hours ago, edwardporter1 said:

Professor. I saw a bunch of lanterns hanging in the barn and maybe you can enlighten me about this kerosene lamp I found going thru a bunch of stuff I have. Can remember where or when I got it. Dietz  Bestov hand Lamp. I electrified it many years ago. Don't know weather I will stump the star!

17027776191848574650786195617184.jpg

17027776381153475758740219657861.jpg

17027777303356099901360505608158.jpg

edwardporter1, My wife might tell you that I think I'm a "know it all" but don't believe her. I often get stumped, and you have stumped me! Often here on this thread when Roger has to straighten me out!  Gary😉

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21 hours ago, Old Binder Guy said:

I've loved American History, Wheat Country History, Montana History and the local stuff.

Gary, l know hat you mean. l love history too, although not so much the prehistoric type. l like American history, starting with the 1850's and thereabouts and all the way up to contemporary history. But my favorite type of history is Texas history. To me, Six Flags Over Texas means a lot more than just a amusement park.

But by being part of this thread, l have learned a whole lot!! About steam engines (and like Anson used to say "steam whustles") And l never realized there was Steam riverboats in Montana until read it here. And l would have never guessed that anyone would've collected and know history of anvils until l read it here.

l'm in several cotton related groups and forums and really enjoy reading about and sharing cotton history. especially the older ways of harvesting it and the ginning process. And l really like reading about trucks and sharing my experiences with them, like hauling apples from Washington state and sheetrock to New Jersey and hauling boxed beef to New York City. And of course hauling crude oil all over Texas, Oklahoma and New Mexico.

l guess what l'm trying to say is that l'm glad that this forum and especially this thread exist so l can share what little l know and learn from everybody here.

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Gary didn't answer the post, so I'll jump in.  That lantern is rare, but there are a few around.  They were hung on a wall or doorway or whatever and could be easily removed and carried.  The pipe on the side feeds air into the burner and doubles as the handle to carry it.  Too bad it was was modified, originals are worth a fair amount of $$$.

119942717_circa-1898-rare-dietz-bestov-hand-kerosene-oil-lamp-.jpg

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5 hours ago, twostepn2001 said:

Gary, l know hat you mean. l love history too, although not so much the prehistoric type. l like American history, starting with the 1850's and thereabouts and all the way up to contemporary history. But my favorite type of history is Texas history. To me, Six Flags Over Texas means a lot more than just a amusement park.

But by being part of this thread, l have learned a whole lot!! About steam engines (and like Anson used to say "steam whustles") And l never realized there was Steam riverboats in Montana until read it here. And l would have never guessed that anyone would've collected and know history of anvils until l read it here.

l'm in several cotton related groups and forums and really enjoy reading about and sharing cotton history. especially the older ways of harvesting it and the ginning process. And l really like reading about trucks and sharing my experiences with them, like hauling apples from Washington state and sheetrock to New Jersey and hauling boxed beef to New York City. And of course hauling crude oil all over Texas, Oklahoma and New Mexico.

l guess what l'm trying to say is that l'm glad that this forum and especially this thread exist so l can share what little l know and learn from everybody here.

twostepn2001, I liked your reply to my reply. I've studied some of the Civil War but am not the buff I should be. I had family on each side. What really turns my crank is the homestead era. Soddys, log cabins, walking plows, seed broadcasters, sawmills, eventually steam engines, multi-bottom prairie plows, Wagons, buggies, automobiles, airplanes, there are just so many inventions that I marvel over. And even hand tools of so many different types. History is so amazing a subject. I love handling where we came from. Even if I'm concerned over where it is all going. But I'll always believe God is in control. Gary😉 

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4 hours ago, Roger Byrne said:

Gary didn't answer the post, so I'll jump in.  That lantern is rare, but there are a few around.  They were hung on a wall or doorway or whatever and could be easily removed and carried.  The pipe on the side feeds air into the burner and doubles as the handle to carry it.  Too bad it was was modified, originals are worth a fair amount of $$$.

119942717_circa-1898-rare-dietz-bestov-hand-kerosene-oil-lamp-.jpg

Thank you Roger. I suspected that air breather I didn't understand, could also be a handle. I've just never ran onto this history before. And I'd agree edwardporter1's lamp would have been worth a ton of bucks before it was electrified. Now you two will have me hunting for one! 😁😁 Gary😉

 

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5 hours ago, Roger Byrne said:

Gary didn't answer the post, so I'll jump in.  That lantern is rare, but there are a few around.  They were hung on a wall or doorway or whatever and could be easily removed and carried.  The pipe on the side feeds air into the burner and doubles as the handle to carry it.  Too bad it was was modified, originals are worth a fair amount of $$$.

119942717_circa-1898-rare-dietz-bestov-hand-kerosene-oil-lamp-.jpg

Thanks for the enlightenment. It certainly was illuminating. Didn't realized the handle acted as a chimney. You guys are the best

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My Christmas post to this thread before I forget or run out of time. We don't have a winter wonderland at this time and it's predicted we'll not have snow for Christmas. I don't remember very many Christmas' without snow. Maybe two?

WinterWonderlandIwonderifIllslipIwonderifIllhaveschoolIwonderifmycarwillstartquestionsnearChristmas.jpg.ee137d02d4102ae55c4089b0c99edede.jpg

I've always loved this painting of Charles M. Russell's painted for the time he was up South Fork of the Little Belt Mountains where he was a cowboy for several years. It was during this time Charlie stopped to visit Grandpa Jäger at his homestead.

CharlesMRussellSantaClausreindeerandsleighatpioneerscabininwinterChristmas.jpg.622bec598c277a6881f630ce46d77773.jpg

I stole this from Montana Matt!

CowboySantaClausonhorsebackforChristmasatnightstarsshowingMatt.jpg.65cc91459ac8758251361aca9a120ec2.jpg

This is a very old photo. I don't think many Montana kids or US kids had this fine of a Christmas toy haul back then?

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And I still have the toy iron steam engine and threshing machine my blacksmith dad made me for my third Christmas.

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I got this Jensen live steam engine for Christmas. I was a 4th grader. A Facebook site colorized it for me. It's pretty accurate too. I wish I still had that ship clock at the left!

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I'm the closest boy, who looks like he running, at an early Yaeger Christmas Eve at Uncle Charley and Aunt Esther's house.

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This is a much later Christmas Eve downstairs at Charley and Esther's house. I'm the one on the right that is still living.

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I think this was Christmas of 1953 at our house. Mom, Dad, me, Annaliese Rouse (German) and Arnold Zweig (Polish). Arnold was an Auschwitz survivor with his dad. They were good friends of ours. They married and lived a good life in America. If they are still living, he'd be pushing 100 years old. I haven't heard anything from them since Mom died in 1980.

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This is Santa Claus' gift to me. And speaking of an old lump of coal, I learned and recorded that Johnny Cash song on the accordion at Silver Creek Studio yesterday and posted it on my Facebook page last night.

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Self explanitory 

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One of the places Coal can be burned and enjoyed! A non electric Avery.

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A Model K Ford Touring Car.

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An old Town Car or Limousine.

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A ca. 1910 Model T Ford Touring Car.

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A 1912 IHC AutoWagon! That's Roger and son Andy a few years ago.

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A 1926 or 1927 Model T Ford Roadster Pickup in a dealership showroom.

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I don't know what it is!

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A Model B or 32 Ford Pickup.

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Santa Claus checking out a 1935 Ford Coupe. I'm pretty sure that's a 1936 Ford Tudor Deluxe Sedan in the showroom though.

1934FordCoupeoutsideofForddealershipSantaClauscheckingitout1936Fordcarinside.Christmas.thumb.jpg.c8a31d3515f4dffbf850918e38f99aff.jpg

A couple of Packard automobiles. A woody station wagon and a "phaeton?"

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A "Grandma Yaeger" Christmas card. She died in 1938.

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The Real Meaning of Christmas. The birth of God's Son, Jesus the Christ. Eternal Salvation is ONLY available through inviting Him into our hearts. Not my opinion. According to God's Word. John 14:6 is my favorite scripture. Gary😔

JesuswithMaryJosephshepherdsChristmasMichaelMachler.thumb.jpg.e62301b3a8a957e31ca46496083455b5.jpg

 

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Ya it looks like a green Christmas here in the Keweenaw

rain Sunday ,Monday ,Tuesday

last year we got snowed in on Christmas Day

wife has a picture of me on snow shoes going to the IH 185 to dig us out

the snow was higher than the F 150 on the farm

any ways all of you have a Merry Christmas 

take a moment to remember what its all about

my lord Jesus coming for all of us

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That picture Gary posted of my son and I in the 1911 Autowagon, is from 1980 when I had just finished overhauling it for a friend.   Below is the Christmas card I sent out a dozen years ago when we got our Model A.

Front_Xmas_Card-2.jpg.aee17ca030ce0c25cb9591070165fbd6.jpgtopWebXmasCard.jpg.5e54f6044364687b01da456c30d7e280.jpgWebXmasCard.jpg.596d8a29d9b222d47867315a784ef090.jpg

 

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Looks like we're in for a green Christmas in the Ozarks too. It was 65 and sunny today, warm enough I let the fire go out in the stove. Supposed to rain also, but now only a half inch rather than the 2.5 inches they were calling for. Might get to finish my plowing after all! 

Merry Christmas Gary and everyone else, God's blessings to each of you and a prosperous New Year!

Mac

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