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IH Tractors on Montana Farm


Old Binder Guy

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For Mike, the Absent Minded Farmer:  The Case "R" series was smaller than the "C" series.  It was designed to compete with the International F12 and W12 tractors.  Case President Leon Clausen was not in favor of the "R" series as he felt it would lose money for the company but the board of directors overruled his objections.  The R's had Waukesha motors instead of Case designed ones like the L and C series.

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As to the steam engine posted by Mike on Sunday, I can only come up with one maker and maybe it's an American-Abell which was built in Toronto, Canada.   It would be one of their smaller engines likely around 16HP.  The positioning of the steam dome, cylinder, governor, control levers, front wheel/hub design, the rear wheel/hub design, along with the general proportions of the engine seem to indicate it could be an American-Abell.  The other A-A engines I found with this layout, had more flat spokes in the rear wheels but they were also larger engines.   Well anyway, that's my best guess.

Snapshot1(10-21-202312-39PM).png.f2b002fd7ef250d03af991a3fc5d22c2.png.5adaf4b336a38cb444d154cec0619793.png

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Maybe I should tell you (all, ya'all) we were listening to our local weather forecasts about the coming weather, when putting the Case in the shed last Sunday!😁

I looked out the window before retiring to bed last night about 10:PM. It was white. This morning I took a couple of photos outside. This one out the front door.

10-25-2023SnowinHelenaoutourfrontdoor.thumb.JPG.f6fb5fef350c5eb4b04c7b261d2ec92b.JPG

This one out the window above the computer desk where I sit writing here.

SnowouttheDenwindow10-25-2023inHelena.thumb.JPG.ecd196aa5ca9a63067f49286decec993.JPG

This was on Facebook this morning. IHC dealer in Sherman, South Dakota, found a cute way to jog his customers into paying up their overdue bills, Harvester World magazine 1918.

IHCdealerinShermanSouthDakotafoundacutewaytojoghiscustomersintopayinguptheiroverduebillsHarvesterWorldmagazine1918.jpg.b57fe4502e1a56316127825531bc38d4.jpg

I placed some photos on this thread recently showing grain binders with engines powering the mechanisms, relieving the horse teams pulling the binders of a lot of strain. This is a gas engine powering a potato digger. "A French-Canadian potato farmer on his horse-drawn digger on a small farm near Caribou, Maine 1940."

French-Canadianpotatofarmeronhishorse-drawndiggeronasmallfarmnearCaribouMaine1940IH.thumb.jpg.2630ef0d37bdb08b3c0b65e44dc59eed.jpg

Gary😉

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19 hours ago, Roger Byrne said:

As to the steam engine posted by Mike on Sunday, I can only come up with one maker and maybe it's an American-Abell which was built in Toronto, Canada.   It would be one of their smaller engines likely around 16HP.  The positioning of the steam dome, cylinder, governor, control levers, front wheel/hub design, the rear wheel/hub design, along with the general proportions of the engine seem to indicate it could be an American-Abell.  The other A-A engines I found with this layout, had more flat spokes in the rear wheels but they were also larger engines.   Well anyway, that's my best guess.

Snapshot1(10-21-202312-39PM).png.f2b002fd7ef250d03af991a3fc5d22c2.png.5adaf4b336a38cb444d154cec0619793.png

 Roger, I'd concur with you that it must be a small horsepower American Abell engine. I was reluctant to post that as I get enough egg on my face here without trying too hard. I did say, "It is possible it is a Canadian engine?" with that brand in mind. The crank disk was screaming American Abell.  Like you I recognize a lot of A-A features here. The six spokes is what spooked me away. But, like you say, I've never seen "little" American-Abell engines near this size. It is usually 26 hp, 28 hp, or 32 hp American Abell engines I know anything about. Gary😉

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I'm putting this photo here of a 1930 Hart Parr 28-50 gas tractor. I got it from Facebook. It was listed as a "New York Special" and that is what stumped me. I was wondering if Hart Parr specialist, Roger Byrne could tell us how the NY Special came about?

1930HPartParr28-50veryraregastractorIH.thumb.jpg.3fb5f02a6dd206bf74edd4d6c78731e4.jpg

I have a heck of a time telling early John Deere D tractors from the General Purpose or GP tractors. I'm not trying to become a John Deere Specialist, just because I pull a Van Brunt grain drill with a Farmall tractor when seeding. You John Deere authorities tell me what these tractors are (besides John Deere). I believe they are both Texas tractors.

Texas1939breakingsodwithaJohnDeeretractorandplowIH.thumb.jpg.83f2f391f57a113011c0c08451593b58.jpg

JohnDeereGPbreakingvirginsoilwithtractorandplowElIndioTexas.1939IH.thumb.jpg.001c4862e4153f1e47fcfdd87ce84155.jpg

This photo is of "potato riddling" in England. I just liked the Field Marshall single cylinder diesel tractor. But if someone wants to report on spud riddling, I'll sure read your answer.

Potatoeriddlingin1950sNorfolkEnglandFieldMarshalltractorIH.thumb.jpg.ede42919fdac3881e3085694335b26c5.jpg

I got this photo of this IH 1206 Farmall from Facebook today. I think it is one sharp looking tractor!

IH1206Farmall.thumb.jpg.a6cce02fd603eb7608f99a090299de95.jpg

This abandoned International Harvester closed dealership with a visible gas pump is somewhere in the Dakotas. Maybe one of you will recognize it?

IHInternationalHarvesterdealershipsomewhereinthefarmbelt.jpg.748367c99f114bc3a9d0628860ffec6f.jpg

Roger may know what this hard rubber tire Shell Oil semi truck is? I sure don't know.

HardrubbertiretruckwithShellOiltankforhaulingoilorfuelIH.thumb.jpg.789ed7a147f020ad42a04f1273efc4b6.jpg

Did I already post this photo??? A team and wagon, an IHC shovel nose truck, and a Model T Ford "pickup."

ChapmanDrugCompanybuggycarandtruckinfrontofLehighValleyrailroadcarKnoxvilleTennessee1918IH.thumb.jpg.1ee15e289a3f4ae4ea0bc894c6c54de2.jpg

A Dodge Brothers Touring Car of ca. 1915-18. They came with a sloped back windshield in 1919.

ca1915DodgeBrothersTouringCarinNorthDakotaIH.thumb.jpg.82982b76d78b44b9a6e63da0e53e43b1.jpg

Dad said they had a 1919 Dodge Brothers Touring car and it was a good automobile. This was the Glengarry baseball team ca. 1920. rear: George Yaeger, unknown, Rudolph Yaeger, brother in-law Bill Dempsey. front: Joe Yaeger (Dad), unknown, Charley Yaeger.

GlengarryBaseballCa1920red.jpg.27382296ff1fcaafbe8c86345c2b5062.jpg

Another view of the Yaeger Brother's Dodge Brothers Touring Car. and the 1918 Aultman-Taylor 30-60 gas tractor.

GrandpaYaegersDodgeTouringCarandAultman-Taylor30-60GasTractor_edited-1.thumb.jpg.c89b79258b591bd07215ff8d17a28f5c.jpg

Another photo (my last) of the Yaeger Brother's Dodge Brother's Touring Car. This photo has the Yaeger's "burned" Aultman-Taylor threshing machine, the Dodge and the 20 hp Reeves Highwheeler steam engine. Dad had emptied the wet bottom "ash pan" and the wind changed blowing live embers toward the straw stack. The stack caught on fire. Dad tried to pull the threshing machine away with the belt, but the belt either broke or came off. They hadn't been thoughtful enough to hook a long log chain to the tongue of the threshing machine, so it got burned beyond repair. That was a terrible burden at harvest. Dad should have put water from the engine on the ashes when he scraped them out. Another case of 20/20 hindsight. 

20ReevesHighwheelerafterfireCa1919.thumb.jpg.ad4e2c978af5ef215c3b2575853ccdab.jpg

I love photos of old service stations where the farmers gathered in off seasons or on rainy days in small farm communities. And there is a Texaco visible gasoline pump here too.

RuralTexacoFillingStationandstorewithvisiblegasolinepumpNorthCarolinacommunitygatheringcenterIH.thumb.jpg.81bc84a76e0e46984795ea532c3a4f8d.jpg

This is Farmall Kid's IHC cultivator. He burned the heavy stubble from his oats crop and pulled this over the cropland with Toot, his IH Farmall M. Most of Mike's machinery is "elderly," or not real new. But you'd be surprised what that old equipment can still do!

MikesIHCCultivatorsteelwheelsspikes10-19-2023.thumb.JPG.7065add8e62f5390c99402134aae25ef.JPG

I took this photo of Toot when we were seeding oats this last spring. Toot is an IH Tractor on a Montana Farm

IHSeeding4-28-2023-4-Tootdrillinfield.thumb.jpg.39f18d7b95203745378a9f7f1b5b73e3.jpg

Toot and the Van Brunt (John Deere) grain drill.

IHFarmallMTootMikevacuumingoutVanBruntdrill4-23-2021.thumb.jpg.cfb587b1347292e9c9a417095ee743ac.jpg

At least flat tires are seldom a problem before we go farming. Gary😁

ModelTdrivemikesmachineryhouse10-3-2023.thumb.JPG.7762817a39b6d94f0ec4244b56a2da13.JPG

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It’s white over here also, Gary.

IMG_9332.thumb.jpeg.5cc52346a665bb8e36a87fd42ef5e08e.jpeg

This doe and two yearlings were in my greenhouse this afternoon when I came home. The two little ones are behind the tree to the right. They have been pests this summer. I can’t bring myself to pull the trigger on one though. I’ll likely regret that next summer now that they are trained. 

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1930HPartParr28-50veryraregastractorIH.jpg.b4e493c0840cbe1ea6068d5c3b434c6c.jpg.b2e004fea1c2440ac5ffbcecb17b049a.jpg

The 25-50 "New York Special" is the standard 25-50 Hart Parr but with extra heavy cast iron wheels.  The standard tractor came with steel wheels or cast wheels but the cast ones on the "New York Special" were almost three times thicker than the standard cast ones and added about 2000# to the weight of the tractor.  I have a friend that restored one and when he drove it around, it left one heck of an imprint! 

HardrubbertiretruckwithShellOiltankforhaulingoilorfuelIH.jpg.a4779390c956ca637f418c573965ba80.thumb.jpg.71c080c40a48d07bc05af0ff7d07f1b7.jpg

SEE CORRETION BELOW . . . The photo above is NOT a GMC "Big Brute" !

The information about the GMC below is correct but not the ID of the one in the photo above.

The tractor pulling the Shell tanker appears it could be an early "Big Brute" that was GMC's largest and most powerful truck.  It used a double transmission that gave it a gear reduction of 100 to 1 for  pulling the heaviest loads.  The one in the photo below was part of the Van Horn Truck collection and it is now located at the I-80 Truck Stop.  It came from Minnesota and had a rough life so there was nothing left of hard rubber tires.  The wheels were replaced with modern ones.  Now days we would have replaced the hard rubber with new ones but at that time (40 years ago) it was not an option.  By the way, it is a bit of a "Brute" to drive!

truck_gmc_bigbrute_01.thumb.jpg.a98e0c43357883ac10b0dd4ee233c8cc.jpg

 

ChapmanDrugCompanybuggycarandtruckinfrontofLehighValleyrailroadcarKnoxvilleTennessee1918IH.jpg.335e249b6ebca8b2d9800224d6d66112.jpg.da5aa533392bee8d11b18f6f1ec370b1.jpg

Now Gary made a mistake, faint.gif.a009d573e80eb2a3ef060028b8d4570e.gif but it is very understandable.  That is not a IHC Shovel Nose in the photo, it is a Lippard-Stewart and was built from 1911 through 1918.  The most noticeable difference is the full width radiator with its curved scalloped top.  Internationals used a narrower, square radiator.   In 1919 the company was reorganized and changed to the Stewart Motor Truck Co.   At that time they changed to the conventional radiator in front design.

1914_Lippard-Stewart_EExpressTruck_231_9ci_30HP_4Cylinder.jpg.d72096e2c2d233968dfd3f8cb7ed89da.jpg

REVRPDsc09136.jpg.f7d007e9385f835c2b8b2b973e629242.jpg

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Gary, let's see now . . . eggs and cheese . . . sounds like an omelet to me.  There were several early trucks that used the slope nose hood with the radiator in back but the three best known ones are the "Bull Dog" Mack, the International, and the Kelly Springfield.  The Mack and the Kelly Springfield pictured below, were both restored and displayed in the Van Horn Museum in Mason City, Iowa.

Antique_3.jpg.89414e87dcf0ec6a0acaa250323a6cb8.jpg.261718e7c57bca1e91ed18cc30957b6e.jpg

ks140102.jpg.e2f58bf4a8904091fb496bab2132add1.jpg

332308682_865304264699859_3736547185419837571_n.jpg.07fc4929b68cc4dc279c43344792b689.jpg

Now for my omelet . . . CORRECTION for MY MISTAKE:  After more research I found that it is not a GMC Big Brute, it is an Scammell truck.  They were built in England from 1921 to 1988 and specialized in special purpose heavy duty trucks.

HardrubbertiretruckwithShellOiltankforhaulingoilorfuelIH.jpg.a4779390c956ca637f418c573965ba80.thumb.jpg.87364120af58caa4723b89c5d77cec0a.jpg

13-26.jpg.3684c06a37651743fa4e2dc3d8b9cfd9.jpg

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image.png.daf2ade3580084f97e069cca20236425.jpg.2d364e7af69d2df04e372b86e9c5a347.jpgimage.png.358fcd40e7be6b556b5504a2f66b50b9.jpg.24e555207fd79706b28cbdb1f11f8413.jpg

Maybe he got run over by an ACME truck loaded with anvils and then one of them fell off the back landing on him??

RPPOSTDsc09743.jpg.f30a7895e6e4ee865729e909b30d5cc7.jpg

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For Tom Railsback, Better known here as "Tubacase47. I bumped into this old Military band photo from North Dakota and I know he loves old band photos. I think the largest horns shown are baritone horns, but Tom can pretend they are miniature tubas.

MilitarymeninBandUSArmyinNorthDakotaNDSU.thumb.jpg.da74652c8980bc3c657417e4968c84ff.jpg

I also found this in my files while looking for the above photo. This one is from Anamoose, North Dakota. I like the unusual bent tuba, or early example of a Sousaphone.

AnamooseNorthDakotaConcertBandearlycirclestraightSousaphoneca1910.thumb.jpg.304acf518cd8f2bb4281a621abe50466.jpg

Here is Tubacase Railsback. 

Tubacase47andhistubaatSilverCreek8-21-14.thumb.jpg.4b7403c7bd90415a61b48ef0a20350a4.jpg

Here's the actual Tubacase.

TomRailsbackTubacase4715hpCase4-21-15red.thumb.jpg.b2787a8c5f38772d3078aa49b6a9d367.jpg

I even posed with the tuba case. I used to play a bb flat Sousaphone in high school band.

GaryBBflattuba15hpCase4-21-15red.thumb.jpg.c0edd56346b010b6515f24b12119e7ee.jpg

62 years ago.

Sousaphone1960GYMoore2.jpg.cd37ace1aebce464ecdb22b9b6f209d7.jpg

Tom is going to have to straighten me out. I don't know if this is he and his dad...

FredE.GreenfieldfromAlexanderIowa1918withboyintubaforTomRailsback.thumb.jpg.a8093682d53fc38aff30dc79fd8311c1.jpg

Or, this is he and his dad?  Gary😉

TomRailsbackTubacase47wherebabiescomefrominMontanaIH.thumb.jpg.0970eaa208704afedb125b8cb09cf0f6.jpg

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OK Gary; the horns in the front row are tubas.  Just behind the player on the left front is a player with a euphonium or tenor tuba.  I'd love to get a print of that picture for my collection as it's one I have never seen before.  My guess is that it's a cavalry band.  In the second picture that's a helicon, the predecessor to the sousaphone.

Finally, it's not me dad and me in the pictures of the boys in the tubas; I'm not old enough to have been around when they were taken.

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An incredible video came up on YouTube of a guy playing an accordion, he was like a one man symphony, I should have linked it for you Gary

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Looks fairly cold and snowy up in your neck of the woods now, Gary. We only just had our first frost yesterday, late as I can remember in my short life. Decided to kindle a fire in the stove on Saturday when the mercury fell from 78 to 48 over night, along with getting 6 inches of rain from Friday to Monday. We needed it, but it put a damper on finishing up Mrs. Mac's cotton picking. At least all the corn is finished, the picker is off the '41 H, and if the weather holds I'll be fitting ground this weekend. To try and warm those of you in the northern climes, I thought I'd share a few photos I've taken over the past months if you wouldn't mind a few IH tractors on an Arkansas farm:

Finishing up my second cutting of hay, with the old work-horse 300 and New Holland Haybine

image.png.60068b731263404638369d3ed4b1057f.png

Baling up the last windrow; the old #37 baler only missed 15 out of 300 bales so I was happy.  

image.png.dd429faa790912acd0857b9bd2ac4b93.png

Started a little hayfield project. Going to plant more corn on this acre for a couple years, then put it back into grass. The "baby wheatland" 340 handles the 9' Deere disk fairly well:

image.png.029e91eed24d71ef1109c4a324560092.png

The end of September saw a new addition to the stable, this 1941 Farmall H. I call him Rusty:

image.png.592542293d3f3b11aa4d289bdb6a8c56.png

Rusty's first job was carrying the 101 picker, which I thought went surprisingly well: 

image.png.565773548bb33db50a90d7e6dd76aa77.png

A little shot of my pumpkin patch, the frost yesterday killed it off but it made several pumpkins for the chickens: 

image.png.308e5d28005145dfc941abb3a6c75f01.png

Finally got all the corn picked, the picker gave a lot of trouble at first but when I got it all lined out it picked pretty good:

image.png.a2b5e1936c07ace58a7eb5cc0cee6f6b.png

And finally, a few shots of our little cotton patch with Mrs. Mac doing some picking: 

2023cottonII.jpg.e8b59e08dd2fe404a8c1cc7eb484ddb7.jpg2023cottonI.jpg.83f29cdcd7e08e57954b7795c67fef07.jpg2023cottonIII.jpg.b048002325893abbe99360295f73db20.jpg

I hope you all enjoy this little slice of my life in the Ozarks! 

Mac

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Winter has started here in the Keweenaw. 

8'' of snow out of the first storm this week.

pig processing started last week [1 down and many to go]

grumpy got his wings and went to ''freezer camp' ':lol:

got a nice scar on my left leg just below the knee

were he got me wile charging out of the pen for feeding time :rolleyes:

deep enuf to bleed but not needing stitches :angry:

 

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On 11/1/2023 at 12:00 PM, MacAR said:

Looks fairly cold and snowy up in your neck of the woods now, Gary. We only just had our first frost yesterday, late as I can remember in my short life. Decided to kindle a fire in the stove on Saturday when the mercury fell from 78 to 48 over night, along with getting 6 inches of rain from Friday to Monday. We needed it, but it put a damper on finishing up Mrs. Mac's cotton picking. At least all the corn is finished, the picker is off the '41 H, and if the weather holds I'll be fitting ground this weekend. To try and warm those of you in the northern climes, I thought I'd share a few photos I've taken over the past months if you wouldn't mind a few IH tractors on an Arkansas farm:

Finishing up my second cutting of hay, with the old work-horse 300 and New Holland Haybine

image.png.60068b731263404638369d3ed4b1057f.png

Baling up the last windrow; the old #37 baler only missed 15 out of 300 bales so I was happy.  

image.png.dd429faa790912acd0857b9bd2ac4b93.png

Started a little hayfield project. Going to plant more corn on this acre for a couple years, then put it back into grass. The "baby wheatland" 340 handles the 9' Deere disk fairly well:

image.png.029e91eed24d71ef1109c4a324560092.png

The end of September saw a new addition to the stable, this 1941 Farmall H. I call him Rusty:

image.png.592542293d3f3b11aa4d289bdb6a8c56.png

Rusty's first job was carrying the 101 picker, which I thought went surprisingly well: 

image.png.565773548bb33db50a90d7e6dd76aa77.png

A little shot of my pumpkin patch, the frost yesterday killed it off but it made several pumpkins for the chickens: 

image.png.308e5d28005145dfc941abb3a6c75f01.png

Finally got all the corn picked, the picker gave a lot of trouble at first but when I got it all lined out it picked pretty good:

image.png.a2b5e1936c07ace58a7eb5cc0cee6f6b.png

And finally, a few shots of our little cotton patch with Mrs. Mac doing some picking: 

2023cottonII.jpg.e8b59e08dd2fe404a8c1cc7eb484ddb7.jpg2023cottonI.jpg.83f29cdcd7e08e57954b7795c67fef07.jpg2023cottonIII.jpg.b048002325893abbe99360295f73db20.jpg

I hope you all enjoy this little slice of my life in the Ozarks! 

Mac

Mac, you have pretty country there and some awesome IH Tractors on an Arkansas Farm! Thanks for posting. It's great to learn about crops and equipment in other areas of the world. Gary😁

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On 10/28/2023 at 8:03 AM, Roger Byrne said:

Gary, let's see now . . . eggs and cheese . . . sounds like an omelet to me.  There were several early trucks that used the slope nose hood with the radiator in back but the three best known ones are the "Bull Dog" Mack, the International, and the Kelly Springfield.  The Mack and the Kelly Springfield pictured below, were both restored and displayed in the Van Horn Museum in Mason City, Iowa.

Antique_3.jpg.89414e87dcf0ec6a0acaa250323a6cb8.jpg.261718e7c57bca1e91ed18cc30957b6e.jpg

ks140102.jpg.e2f58bf4a8904091fb496bab2132add1.jpg

332308682_865304264699859_3736547185419837571_n.jpg.07fc4929b68cc4dc279c43344792b689.jpg

Now for my omelet . . . CORRECTION for MY MISTAKE:  After more research I found that it is not a GMC Big Brute, it is an Scammell truck.  They were built in England from 1921 to 1988 and specialized in special purpose heavy duty trucks.

HardrubbertiretruckwithShellOiltankforhaulingoilorfuelIH.jpg.a4779390c956ca637f418c573965ba80.thumb.jpg.87364120af58caa4723b89c5d77cec0a.jpg

13-26.jpg.3684c06a37651743fa4e2dc3d8b9cfd9.jpg

Scammell....

I dont know anything but the tanker has a oval rear side window, which niether the GMC nor Scammell do.  Brute looking buggers

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OK . . . here is another Scammell truck with an oval window and it is hauling Shell products too.

Scammellarchivecode1438.thumb.jpg.9ba038ad293ee0453aeb543ce7d0b5ec.jpg

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ln one of the FB groups l'm in is about the history of the Texas county l was born in. Back in the 1880's when it was first formed, the county seat was a  small town named Emma. ln the 1930's the county seat was moved to Crosbyton, Texas. After the last cotton gin shut down there in the 1950's, Emma became a ghost town. But here is a ad from the Emma newspaper dated 1-25-1929 for the IH dealer. l think it's kind of neat that it was also a hardware store.

 

image.png.ada4490e10fee0f3f228933e08934b43.png

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On 11/4/2023 at 9:29 AM, twostepn2001 said:

ln one of the FB groups l'm in is about the history of the Texas county l was born in. Back in the 1880's when it was first formed, the county seat was a  small town named Emma. ln the 1930's the county seat was moved to Crosbyton, Texas. After the last cotton gin shut down there in the 1950's, Emma became a ghost town. But here is a ad from the Emma newspaper dated 1-25-1929 for the IH dealer. l think it's kind of neat that it was also a hardware store.

 

image.png.ada4490e10fee0f3f228933e08934b43.png

twostepn2001, can I add another twist to your Emma Hardware Co. "The Winchester Store" advertisement. It's interesting that it is also a McCormick-Deering IHC Dealership. I'd like to relate to those who don't know the story of how it became a Winchester Repeating Arms Store. AND this is 1929! I used to be super deep into "Winchester Repeating Arms"!

In WWI, Winchester Repeating Arms had been building the "Contract, .303 British" Enfield Rifles for the British Army. The U.S. Government couldn't get 30-06 Springfield rifles fast enough. So the U.S. Government proposed to Winchester Repeating Arms to build a 30-06 Enfield Rifle. Basically all they had to do is stretch the bolt and magazine, then build the "Enfield .303" rifle in 30-06. Winchester Repeating Arms boosted tooling and personnel to build these U.S. 30-06 rifles.

1917WinchesterUSArmyRifle.thumb.jpg.0faa9035710deb0783086ba0da717452.jpg

Then WWI ended. Here is this massive machining facility. Are they going to auction off equipment and lay off workers? Someone suggested they could build "hardware" equipment. Management looked into starting from scratch or buying a "name brand" Hardware Company that Winchester Repeating Arms could continue on their coattails. They bought the Simmons Hardware Company. Simmons was popular for their "Keen-Kutter" hardware brand.

I have a couple of Keen Kutter hatchets, several saws, chisels, etc.

HatchetKeenKutter.thumb.JPG.627bb5912d8d11c06fc31fa31ac4e035.JPGSimmonsHardwareCompanyKeenKutter1907advertisement.jpg.ee813284bab951fbe9119186780e7024.jpg

So Winchester Repeating Arms built the Keen Kutter equipment but changed the name to Winchester Repeating Arms, as their firearms were sold as. I have a hand held sharpening stone, that I don't have a photo of. It Says "Winchester Tools - As Good As The Gun!" or something close to that.

I used to be heavy into Winchester Repeating Arms Hardware Company tools. They are still highly desired collectibles. This Axe, Saw, Brace and Bits in the bag are some I still have.

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This is a picture of a Winchester Repeating Arms butcher knife and sharpening steel. The bottom knife is a Remington Arms knife.

RemingtonbutcherknifeWinchestersteelbutcherknifemezzanine5-16-16.thumb.jpg.422d77125c17a914ed804f05d0f6b29e.jpg

One of my favorites is in a drawer right here by my left leg. An "unsharpened" but no box, Winchester Repeating Arms pocket knife. This old photo was taken at Silver Creek on my desk. I also have some Winchester Repeating Arms pliers, pipe wrench, and some other things that escape me.

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Now, I'll finish the first part of my "story." Like I said, it is interesting that twostepn2001's newspaper advertisement was from "1929"! In 1929, The Winchester Repeating Arms Company took bankruptcy and discontinued their hardware manufacturing. The Stock Market Crash of 1929 did it to the company.

Now maybe some of you have heard of "Winchester Western?" That was now the name of Winchester arms manufacturing. Winchester~Western. And Now You Know.................... The Rest Of The Story!

I barely have fingerprints of these Winchester Repeating Arms Rifles I used to own. They paid for 1-1/4 college educations for two daughters. I helped Mike some with extra too, but most of his college was paid for by the U.S. Army and he worked night jobs and weekends too.

These are five Model 76 Winchester rifles and one carbine. All calibers offered were represented. Deluxe butts, pistol grips, burled wood, peep sights, and checkering were there too.

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These were all Model 1894s. All five calibers in both rifle and carbine, plus a takedown deluxe.

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The three closest are: A Henry, a Model 1866 saddle ring carbine and octagon rifle. I had a second Henry not pictured. They all four shot .44 Henry Flat rimfire cartridges. Mike and I both shot two rounds through one of the Henrys, just to be able to say we've done it. Gary😉 

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Winchester 1886 & 1976 Big Mountain Trading Company.jpg

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