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IH Tractors on Montana Farm


Old Binder Guy

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The photo of the International shovel nose truck posted by twostepn2001 could be an F which would be the One Ton version.  It appears to have a longer wheelbase than my H.  Below are the specs for IHC trucks of that 1914 to 1922 period and the truck pictured on the top of the chart is a G which used the same engine as the 8-16 International tractor.

3rpIHCSpec1920.jpg.b8719b7e451740066e353c6ffd7b0b6f.jpg1rpIHCSpec1920.jpg.080cb06773b2f04855a831c12b207bf9.jpg2rpIHCSpec1920.jpg.f4c46242085e789ca0c0800672911b9d.jpg

 

747943924_rppostImg_8580.jpg.0b3a72207225ec5f4b49f35358b2bb4b.jpg

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11 hours ago, twostepn2001 said:

Was perusing the "interweb" yesterday and found this pic. The only information about it said "International F series truck with cotton bales. 1921". ls that what that particular model was called?  F series? Regardless, looks like he's been in some mud somewhere.

image.png.283ca57124ab860f9c3b7e16604f8e2b.png

twostepn2001, I'm sorry I didn't open up this page before posting. I should have known Roger would "build a clock" instead of just telling us what time it was.

This is Roger's "shovel nose" International. It may be a Type F? He has it listed as a Model 21. Gary😁 

Shovel Nose IHC Model 21 Roger's right front of truck.jpg

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To the comment Gary made saying my shovel nose a Model 21 . . . well he is sorta right.  My 1920 truck's serial number and the data plate indicates it is a Model H however during the later part of 1920, IHC up graded their trucks with a heavier rear spring system and changed from letter designations to numbers.  At that time the Model H was changed to a Model 21 and was re-rated from a 3/4 to a 1 ton with those heavier springs.  My truck has that heavier spring setup so while being badged as an H, I guess technically it's a 21?

postrev8248.thumb.jpg.51b61c4f56e94398ca3d7a05d7bf8cad.jpgpostrevDsc08252.jpg.10b9c45799be65879444da86432cf8cc.jpgpostrevsc08256.jpg.e702f75a9598aabe016a1c2d179b80cd.jpgpostrevDsc08255.jpg.b83f77dd2157f6c831a510c8b15df33d.jpg

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3 hours ago, Roger Byrne said:

To the comment Gary made saying my shovel nose a Model 21 . . . well he is sorta right.  My 1920 truck's serial number and the data plate indicates it is a Model H however during the later part of 1920, IHC up graded their trucks with a heavier rear spring system and changed from letter designations to numbers.  At that time the Model H was changed to a Model 21 and was re-rated from a 3/4 to a 1 ton with those heavier springs.  My truck has that heavier spring setup so while being badged as an H, I guess technically it's a 21?

postrev8248.thumb.jpg.51b61c4f56e94398ca3d7a05d7bf8cad.jpgpostrevDsc08252.jpg.10b9c45799be65879444da86432cf8cc.jpgpostrevsc08256.jpg.e702f75a9598aabe016a1c2d179b80cd.jpgpostrevDsc08255.jpg.b83f77dd2157f6c831a510c8b15df33d.jpg

Everything is so spiffy clean on Roger's shovel nose truck, I'll bet he warms his sandwich and coffee on the engine each day after he cranks it up. I love it that Roger leaves the outside looking used and unpolished, but has the interior under that shovel hood clean enough to eat off of. Gary😁 

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Way ahead of their time, exhaust has dumps on it for trail racing 😁

Seriously that is one nice restoration ♥️

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Well, Booger Creek Gin hired a new ginner's assistant. l have to admit she don't have much experience but the T-shirt fit sooo..... She turned one year old last week and been walking for about two weeks and starting to talk. We been trying to get her to say "pawpaw" and finally this morning she said "pappy" instead so go figure. We got Booger Creek T-shirts for the other 3 great-granddaughters but they haven't got to come down to visit since school has been out.

image.thumb.jpeg.94bb286862568c2fca1b360aa7f8e921.jpeg

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22 hours ago, hardtail said:

Way ahead of their time, exhaust has dumps on it for trail racing

 

On 6/3/2022 at 12:55 PM, Old Binder Guy said:

I'll bet he warms his sandwich and coffee on the engine each day after he cranks it up.

OBG might have it right that could be the connection for the optional food warmer    😄

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Thanks for the positive comment about the restoration hardtail.  That variable opening you see on the exhaust manifold is not an exhaust bleed but the regulator for the preheater.  The air is taken in that opening and across those fins on the manifold, through the engine block and into the carb by way off that black pipe you see on the carb.   It's there to control the air temp going to the carb to prevent it from icing and to help to burn the low grade fuels of that period.  That being said, with today's fuels, it does a great job of creating a vapor lock when you shut the engine down and then try to restart it!

As far as the engine looking better than the rest of the truck, well there is a bit of a story to that.  I originally help give a full restoration on that truck back in 1975 when it was owned by a friend of mine, Wes Foss.  About 10 years later his age and health issues caused him to sell his home and his collection.  At that time a guy offer to buy his whole collection including the Shovel Nose and his Autowagon (which I had rebuilt a few years earlier).  At that time, I didn't have the $$$ to buy the Shovel Nose or the Autowagon, so they went with the rest of the collection.  Over the years, the Shovel Nose sat neglected in a dirt floor shed sinking almost up to the axles and was never run.  When that guy need to go to a Care Center it was sold to another guy that brought it home and never did anything with it other than wash it off.   About 10 years ago, thinking about how much I liked that truck and the memories of time with my old friend Wes, I figured I wanted to find that truck and if possible, purchase it.  After a few years I got lucky when a friend of mine (Troy Vetsch) found it for sale on FaceBook over in Wisconsin.  I was able to buy the truck in May of 2015.  The guy I got it from said they had tried to start it by pulling it around but it wouldn't start so they just parked it back in the shed.  It was a damn good thing it didn't start because when I got it home and went to drain the oil, it wouldn't even come out.  I pulled the oil pan off and found a mixture of oil and water that had turned into a semi-solid sludge.  When I saw that mess, I decided to pull the engine and go through it.  The engine itself was in pretty good shape having been rebuilt back in 1975 and not run a lot, but there was a little water damage in the crankcase that needed fixing.  After going through the engine I figured I'd may as well repaint it so that is why it looks so nice.  I did a number of other repairs to the truck to correct for all the years of neglect including a lot of rework on the wheels and some repainting. 

The photo below is from 1976 when Wes showed it at a Bi-Centennial celebration.

257977353_comp1976FossIHCModelH.jpg.749a74d71bfd9b1c0d41b1a8929062d6.jpg

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I am afraid my camera would not be clean enough to take a picture of the shovel nose engine!!!

Think I will just stick with my AutoWagon.

*******

What was the thought process at the time on the location of the radiator at the firewall???

 

DD

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Anson, there are two thoughts on why they were built with the radiator back by the firewall. 

First is that your old buddy Wrangler's grandfathers didn't like the way trucks were starting to take over the freighting business.  They convinced the teamster drivers that while standing in line to pick up their loads, that they should "accidentally" back up and crash the back of the wagon into the radiator of the truck behind them and put it out of commission.  Remember that even many of the IHC Autowagons were also water cooled and had a radiator out front too.  This trick was well know at some of freight terminals back in the early years.  Now this may sound like a wild story but remember that in the early days of hauling freight, the competition between the various companies was very fierce.  Horse powered wagons were the norm and this newfangled motor truck was looked upon as an unwanted competitor.  

How that being said, the other reason is that with the radiator behind the engine, it is easier to work on.  Another thing that International did on the Shovel Nose trucks, is have the engine and transmission mounted in a sub-frame that can be removed from the main chassis to be worked on.  Just remove the hood plus a few bolts and the whole unit can be taken out for repair.  It was also common for large companies with a fleet of Shovel Noses would have engine/transmission units ready to exchange.  If an engine started knocking or other serious problem, bring it into the shop, pull the unit out and install the a different one.  The exchange could be done in less than an hour and the truck would be back on the road. 

You can take your pick of which version you like . . . both have credibility in history.

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13 hours ago, Delta Dirt said:

I am afraid my camera would not be clean enough to take a picture of the shovel nose engine!!!

Think I will just stick with my AutoWagon.

*******

What was the thought process at the time on the location of the radiator at the firewall???

 

DD

Anson, Before International Harvester put the radiator behind the hood, the French had been building their Renault with shovel noses and radiators at the firewall. The roadster below is a 1910 model. Gary😁

533076062_1910RenaultShovelHoodroadsterFrench.thumb.jpg.844635164b0469c444f7580e3a923b2e.jpg

1853313637_FrenchRenaultLimousinewithshovelhoodandrearradiator.jpg.5c48d6311dec160ebc32216343d2bc14.jpg

1307308854_FrenchRenaultLimousinewithshovelhood.jpg.1b4f2bed54d9788bc001c8310a7a84cf.jpg

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13 hours ago, Roger Byrne said:

Anson, there are two thoughts on why they were built with the radiator back by the firewall. 

First is that your old buddy Wrangler's grandfathers didn't like the way trucks were starting to take over the freighting business.  They convinced the teamster drivers that while standing in line to pick up their loads, that they should "accidentally" back up and crash the back of the wagon into the radiator of the truck behind them and put it out of commission.  Remember that even many of the IHC Autowagons were also water cooled and had a radiator out front too.  This trick was well know at some of freight terminals back in the early years.  

How that being said, the other reason is that with the radiator behind the engine, it is easier to work on.  Another thing that International did on the Shovel Nose trucks, is have the engine and transmission mounted in a sub-frame that can be removed from the frame to be worked on.  Just remove the hood plus a few bolts and the whole unit can be taken out for repair.  It was also common for large companies with a fleet of Shovel Noses would have engine/transmission units ready to exchange.  If an engine started knocking or other serious problem, bring it into the shop, pull the unit out and install the a different one.  The exchange could be done in less than an hour and the truck would be back on the road. 

You can take your pick of which version you like . . . both have credibility in history.

There is total reliability in the line Roger fed you Anson. It's been known forever that when a horse saw an IHC with a radiator in front, they went ballistic. The horses wanted to crash their wagons into the radiators. So IHC built the shovel nose trucks for a few years, until the horses adjusted to the fact they were on their way out for freighting and on the streets. Gary😉

1644915375_IHCAutowagonmakinghorseonwagonrearup.jpg.ba565649a52666d7a83d6e795ea02005.jpg

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Since I don't know anything, I guess I'll post some photos. This steam "rototiller" from 1882 in Europe on a Ganz steam engine took my eye. 

1522833404_1882GanzSteamTractorwithRoataryTurn-aboutrototillerPlowebayIH.thumb.jpg.e5cf9960beb4293bf5e8654bb7861af8.jpg

This photo was listed as a "Case." It blew the firebox completely off of the boiler. They weren't real strong boilers back then anyway. When a crown sheet gets hot and the engine is "sloshed" in the least amount, it will blow away the weakest part of the boiler. The "weakest chain link" theory.

978198637_WoodenspokewheelunknownCaseSteamengineboilerexplosionblewoutfireboxandfluesheetebayIH.thumb.jpg.1bae74a2051a9f1c97d9459321bb084b.jpg

This 15 hp Case engine is busy threshing. It's burning "cow chips" (Dried cow pies. cheap fuel!)

2018981423_Anearly15or20hpCasethreshingin1915burningcowchipsforfuelDavidFullerIH.thumb.jpg.212a6bf6757057edf5b71da0088c66dc.jpg

An early small crank disk Case tandem compound engine (I can't decide if it is a 12 or  15 hp engine?). I think 15 hp.

1551089823_15hpCasesmallcrankdisktandemcompoundstackthreshingatbarninMichigan1909MarkO.thumb.jpg.370f9740db13e466ef8c2d7de3be3185.jpg

The dad is checking on his sons to see how they are coming working on their Russell engine. There is one of the sons inside the tiny firebox of this 10 or 12 hp engine. A granddaughter is checking on "the men" too.

680310814_10or12hpRussellwithmaninsidefireboxDavidFullerIH.jpg.17c537fe02a69d5ab16afcdd2bdf92f9.jpg

A 16 hp Nichols & Shepard engine is assisting manpower in a barn raising.

240240321_16hpNicholsShepardenginehelpingwithbarnraisingDavidFullerIH.jpg.8c9275b966c1c8bc64b07e7792fbfb4a.jpg

"Oh shucks" has been in a farmer's vocabulary for quite a few years, I think? His 16 hp Gaar Scott engine has ground to a halt in mud.

300098263_GaarScottenginestuckinthemud.October201912inOhioCraigDetwiler.jpg.b99a57f5f17f2b5a52647376075ab7b8.jpg

A 21 hp Northwest Thresher Company cross compound is their smallest cross compound engine made in Stillwater, Minnesota.

1279426602_21hpNorthwestThresherCompanycrosscompoundengineDavidFuller.jpg.2c804e68c5b4ce716f98035ea6871c41.jpg

An old touring car is parked next to their 32 hp cross-compound American-Abell engine in Canada.

1876089154_32hpAmericanAbellcrosscompoundengineonthebeltandoldtouringcarautomobileDavidFullerIH.thumb.jpg.40000bc8ea068e5d1794e97d52aa8939.jpg

On the same farm as the above is this 36 hp Rumely steam engine, with another old Touring Car.

1050918435_36hpMRumelyenginethreshingoldtouringcarautomobileDavidFuller.thumb.jpg.e70c3b9c61ae5e4084481500b40ad857.jpg

A Buffalo Springfield road roller got itself into a predicament here. I'm unable to describe what happened, but the spikes were put into the driver wheels after it got "into a pickle!"

1399536518_BuffaloSpringfieldroadsteamrollerroadrollerstuckwithspikesindriverwheelsDavidFullerIH.thumb.jpg.068d60868644ee730c098ae43a71d9b7.jpg

A 1913 "wide smokestack" lap seam 80 hp Case engine is pulling plows.

1258886391_191380hpCaseplowingontheEgganBrothersFarmKincaidSaskatchewanCanadaDavidFullerIH.thumb.jpg.7c0b5c096bf954c0a1a842cb9bcc8d2c.jpg

A Type B or Type C IHC tractor is pulling disk plows.

1217592981_IHCTypeBorCtractorpulling12-diskplowsDavidFuller.thumb.jpg.bdbd0ca6c29299ca31120bd59e30d15c.jpg

I'm pretty sure this Aultman-Taylor gas tractor is a 30-60, on this railroad flatcar.

1655914015_30-60Aultman-TaylorgastractoronaRailroadRRflatcarebay.thumb.jpg.772e3ce6c68e53e58ab5fff432c2335d.jpg

This is a "tough guy" at a fair "side show" going to stop that Rumely Oilpull tractor. The information with the photo said this was just before his hernia operation.

195064538_RumelyOilpullwithstrongmanatfairbeforehisherniaoperationDavidFullerIH.thumb.jpg.3d82af3cf823afaf424f2319cabf0cb2.jpg

A Hackney Auto-Plow.

2112030521_1912HackneyAutoPlowBW.jpg.576a9e1f61e43dc79ae46ce6aba7b0aa.jpg

A 40-80 Avery gas tractor is pulling two road graders.

63200231_A40-80AverygastractorpullingtwogradersgradingroadDavidFuller.thumb.jpg.6a0c6961a490f85a5cf3447b9a0678c2.jpg

A 9-18 cross motor Case tractor. 

1751172866_9-18crossmotorCasegastractorDavidFullerIH.thumb.jpg.e07beb79b014bb89227359c5330ced75.jpg

I'm not familiar with a Fox tractor. This one in Wisconsin is a 20-40.

143486975_Fox20-40gastractorebayIH.thumb.jpg.0d43cd9a50f000726220592a2fb385ed.jpg

I can't tell if there are five or six tractors ganging up on moving this shed?

2105714563_FivegastractorsmovingashedhouseyettodoDavidFullerIH.jpg.256a9bd75dc646efe36384812b3781e1.jpg

A Grand Trunk Railroad "Western" streamlined steam locomotive stopped at the station. I got to see one streamliner steam locomotive in my childhood. It was a Milwaukee "Hiawatha" and it thrilled me!

1256968095_GrandTrunkWesternsteamstreamlinelocomotive6409ChicagoIllinois1952DavidFullerIH.thumb.jpg.e3edd13daacd4adfd8de9262071dbe16.jpg

A steam powered excavator is going to load belly dump wagons behind a crawler. Maybe one of you know that size of it, and the manufacturer?

189795515_AsteamKeystoneexcavatorandacrawlertractorDavidFullerIH.thumb.jpg.6f7c723cfe6f3a83c6285acefe73dd6f.jpg

Son Mike surprised me recently! He moved the 1926 Model T Coupe from its winter berth to headed out the shop door.

354571035_1926ModelTFordmovedupintotheshopbayMike5-27-2022.thumb.jpg.3cac7380abf16aa50292c30365dd3fbe.jpg

I took advantage of it being headed out the door a couple of days now! Gary😁

877608919_1926ModelTFordoutforadrivetorange6-1-2022.thumb.jpg.817ab4e5cfa9743f5aeeb6ab51de9a29.jpg

 

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5 hours ago, Old Binder Guy said:

Since I don't know anything, I guess I'll post some photos. This steam "rototiller" from 1882 in Europe on a Ganz steam engine took my eye. 

1522833404_1882GanzSteamTractorwithRoataryTurn-aboutrototillerPlowebayIH.thumb.jpg.e5cf9960beb4293bf5e8654bb7861af8.jpg

This photo was listed as a "Case." It blew the firebox completely off of the boiler. They weren't real strong boilers back then anyway. When a crown sheet gets hot and the engine is "sloshed" in the least amount, it will blow away the weakest part of the boiler. The "weakest chain link" theory.

978198637_WoodenspokewheelunknownCaseSteamengineboilerexplosionblewoutfireboxandfluesheetebayIH.thumb.jpg.1bae74a2051a9f1c97d9459321bb084b.jpg

This 15 hp Case engine is busy threshing. It's burning "cow chips" (Dried cow pies. cheap fuel!)

2018981423_Anearly15or20hpCasethreshingin1915burningcowchipsforfuelDavidFullerIH.thumb.jpg.212a6bf6757057edf5b71da0088c66dc.jpg

An early small crank disk Case tandem compound engine (I can't decide if it is a 12 or  15 hp engine?). I think 15 hp.

1551089823_15hpCasesmallcrankdisktandemcompoundstackthreshingatbarninMichigan1909MarkO.thumb.jpg.370f9740db13e466ef8c2d7de3be3185.jpg

The dad is checking on his sons to see how they are coming working on their Russell engine. There is one of the sons inside the tiny firebox of this 10 or 12 hp engine. A granddaughter is checking on "the men" too.

680310814_10or12hpRussellwithmaninsidefireboxDavidFullerIH.jpg.17c537fe02a69d5ab16afcdd2bdf92f9.jpg

A 16 hp Nichols & Shepard engine is assisting manpower in a barn raising.

240240321_16hpNicholsShepardenginehelpingwithbarnraisingDavidFullerIH.jpg.8c9275b966c1c8bc64b07e7792fbfb4a.jpg

"Oh shucks" has been in a farmer's vocabulary for quite a few years, I think? His 16 hp Gaar Scott engine has ground to a halt in mud.

300098263_GaarScottenginestuckinthemud.October201912inOhioCraigDetwiler.jpg.b99a57f5f17f2b5a52647376075ab7b8.jpg

A 21 hp Northwest Thresher Company cross compound is their smallest cross compound engine made in Stillwater, Minnesota.

1279426602_21hpNorthwestThresherCompanycrosscompoundengineDavidFuller.jpg.2c804e68c5b4ce716f98035ea6871c41.jpg

An old touring car is parked next to their 32 hp American-Abell engine in Canada.

1876089154_32hpAmericanAbellcrosscompoundengineonthebeltandoldtouringcarautomobileDavidFullerIH.thumb.jpg.40000bc8ea068e5d1794e97d52aa8939.jpg

On the same farm as the above is this 36 hp Rumely steam engine, with another old Touring Car.

1050918435_36hpMRumelyenginethreshingoldtouringcarautomobileDavidFuller.thumb.jpg.e70c3b9c61ae5e4084481500b40ad857.jpg

A Buffalo Springfield road roller got itself into a predicament here. I'm unable to describe what happened, but the spikes were put into the driver wheels after it got "into a pickle!"

1399536518_BuffaloSpringfieldroadsteamrollerroadrollerstuckwithspikesindriverwheelsDavidFullerIH.thumb.jpg.068d60868644ee730c098ae43a71d9b7.jpg

A 1913 "wide smokestack" lap seam Case engine is pulling plows.

1258886391_191380hpCaseplowingontheEgganBrothersFarmKincaidSaskatchewanCanadaDavidFullerIH.thumb.jpg.7c0b5c096bf954c0a1a842cb9bcc8d2c.jpg

A Type B or Type C IHC tractor is pulling disk plows.

1217592981_IHCTypeBorCtractorpulling12-diskplowsDavidFuller.thumb.jpg.bdbd0ca6c29299ca31120bd59e30d15c.jpg

I'm pretty sure this Aultman-Taylor gas tractor is a 30-60, on this railroad flatcar.

1655914015_30-60Aultman-TaylorgastractoronaRailroadRRflatcarebay.thumb.jpg.772e3ce6c68e53e58ab5fff432c2335d.jpg

This is a "tough guy" at a fair "side show" going to stop that Rumely Oilpull tractor. The information with the photo said this was just before his hernia operation.

195064538_RumelyOilpullwithstrongmanatfairbeforehisherniaoperationDavidFullerIH.thumb.jpg.3d82af3cf823afaf424f2319cabf0cb2.jpg

A Hackney Auto-Plow.

2112030521_1912HackneyAutoPlowBW.jpg.576a9e1f61e43dc79ae46ce6aba7b0aa.jpg

A 40-80 Avery gas tractor is pulling two road graders.

63200231_A40-80AverygastractorpullingtwogradersgradingroadDavidFuller.thumb.jpg.6a0c6961a490f85a5cf3447b9a0678c2.jpg

A 9-18 cross motor Case tractor. 

1751172866_9-18crossmotorCasegastractorDavidFullerIH.thumb.jpg.e07beb79b014bb89227359c5330ced75.jpg

I'm not familiar with a Fox tractor. This one in Wisconsin is a 20-40.

143486975_Fox20-40gastractorebayIH.thumb.jpg.0d43cd9a50f000726220592a2fb385ed.jpg

I can't tell if there are five or six tractors ganging up on moving this shed?

2105714563_FivegastractorsmovingashedhouseyettodoDavidFullerIH.jpg.256a9bd75dc646efe36384812b3781e1.jpg

A Grand Trunk Railroad "Western" streamlined steam locomotive stopped at the station. I got to see one streamliner steam locomotive in my childhood. It was a Milwaukee "Hiawatha" and it thrilled me!

1256968095_GrandTrunkWesternsteamstreamlinelocomotive6409ChicagoIllinois1952DavidFullerIH.thumb.jpg.e3edd13daacd4adfd8de9262071dbe16.jpg

A steam powered excavator is going to load belly dump wagons behind a crawler. Maybe one of you know that size of it, and the manufacturer?

189795515_AsteamKeystoneexcavatorandacrawlertractorDavidFullerIH.thumb.jpg.6f7c723cfe6f3a83c6285acefe73dd6f.jpg

Son Mike surprised me recently! He moved the 1926 Model T Coupe from its winter berth to headed out the shop door.

354571035_1926ModelTFordmovedupintotheshopbayMike5-27-2022.thumb.jpg.3cac7380abf16aa50292c30365dd3fbe.jpg

I took advantage of it being headed out the door a couple of days now! Gary😁

877608919_1926ModelTFordoutforadrivetorange6-1-2022.thumb.jpg.817ab4e5cfa9743f5aeeb6ab51de9a29.jpg

 

That's one of GTW's U4b's leaving Dearborn station in Chicago. I'd recognize the dilapidated train shed & Lee jeans sign anywhere. Where did you get a chance to see a Hiawatha? They are my favorite of the streamlined steamers.

Mike

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12 hours ago, Absent Minded Farmer said:

That's one of GTW's U4b's leaving Dearborn station in Chicago. I'd recognize the dilapidated train shed & Lee jeans sign anywhere. Where did you get a chance to see a Hiawatha? They are my favorite of the streamlined steamers.

Mike

Mike, I believe it was just passing through Lewistown, Montana, but stopped for a while at the Milwaukee Depot on Main Street. I wouldn't bet the farm on that either. it may have been at Harlowton, Montana, on the main line? I'm not sure which type it was either. I don't have a lot of memory of it. I was still two years old, I believe? I may have been three? Dad made sure I got to see it though.

I bought the photo below for $3 in a junk shop several years ago. It's an 8"X10" taken at Hopkins, Minnesota. Gary😉

Locomotive streamliner Milwaukee RR at Hopkins, MN red.jpg

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1 hour ago, Old Binder Guy said:

Mike, I believe it was just passing through Lewistown, Montana, but stopped for a while at the Milwaukee Depot on Main Street. I wouldn't bet the farm on that either. it may have been at Harlowton, Montana, on the main line? I'm not sure which type it was either. I don't have a lot of memory of it. I was still two years old, I believe? I may have been three? Dad made sure I got to see it though.

I bought the photo below for $3 in a junk shop several years ago. It's an 8"X10" taken at Hopkins, Minnesota. Gary😉

Locomotive streamliner Milwaukee RR at Hopkins, MN red.jpg

I think Hopkins is on the Hastings & Dakota Division of the Milwaukee Road. The streamlined Chippewa Hiawathas 151 & 152 worked the trains between Michigan's UP & Chicago, later cut back to Milwaukee. These engines were bumped from service around 1950, in favor of the new diesels. Thought they were on one of the Iowa divisions for a brief spell after that. I'll have to dig through my books to see what name train ran on this line. As for one of the streamlined steamers being in Montana? I'm honestly not sure. I've heard conflicting stories that the original Hiawatha trainset of 1935 did/didn't make it all the way out Seattle on a system wide tour. The usual routes served by the streamliners stayed in the Mid West.... though I really want to say that they were used as far west as Aberdeen or Omaha.

 

Now, all that research was done some time ago & I would really like to revisit it to see what has been unearthed. I'll do some poking around this evening & see what I can come up with. Would be neat to find out that the first trainset made a run to Seattle. The thought of one of the mighty class A Atlantics gliding through the mountains, across the bridges & through the tunnels of W Montana would be an exciting one. Also a lot of straightaways to open her up on before they get that far & lots of oil to drink, as many of the steamers on the Milwaukee & other railroads were oil burners out there. A lot were under wire, too.

Mike 

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On 6/6/2022 at 2:30 PM, Absent Minded Farmer said:

I think Hopkins is on the Hastings & Dakota Division of the Milwaukee Road. The streamlined Chippewa Hiawathas 151 & 152 worked the trains between Michigan's UP & Chicago, later cut back to Milwaukee. These engines were bumped from service around 1950, in favor of the new diesels. Thought they were on one of the Iowa divisions for a brief spell after that. I'll have to dig through my books to see what name train ran on this line. As for one of the streamlined steamers being in Montana? I'm honestly not sure. I've heard conflicting stories that the original Hiawatha trainset of 1935 did/didn't make it all the way out Seattle on a system wide tour. The usual routes served by the streamliners stayed in the Mid West.... though I really want to say that they were used as far west as Aberdeen or Omaha.

 

Now, all that research was done some time ago & I would really like to revisit it to see what has been unearthed. I'll do some poking around this evening & see what I can come up with. Would be neat to find out that the first trainset made a run to Seattle. The thought of one of the mighty class A Atlantics gliding through the mountains, across the bridges & through the tunnels of W Montana would be an exciting one. Also a lot of straightaways to open her up on before they get that far & lots of oil to drink, as many of the steamers on the Milwaukee & other railroads were oil burners out there. A lot were under wire, too.

Mike 

A potpourri of our old "Jawbone" Milwaukee RR that went past three sides of our house. I was so blessed to get to grow up there and experience the steam locomotives while they ran. This photo has been here several times, but shows Buttermilk Curve "horseshoe" loop around our homestead. It negated building a huge trestle across Beaver Creek Valley.

1422965558_YaegerRanchfromBeaverCreekHill32ReevesinLRcorneratButtermilkCurveimpcrop.thumb.jpg.e1d15bf31e70b25ddc5a00573f504903.jpg

When the Montana Railroad "Jawbone" went through the farm in July of 1903, Grandma Yaeger was "Italian-Swiss" and could speak to the construction workers. She took them cool buttermilk every afternoon, and the Jawbone named the curve, Buttermilk Curve. When the first steam locomotive and work train arrived in Lewistown on October 21, 1903, Grandma and Grandpa were there. Notice, the Jawbone had jawboned rolling stock from the Northern Pacific Railroad. And I'm sure the Northern Pacific was wanting to help out this new competitor to the Great Northern Railway?

1201127326_1stJawbonesteamlocomotivetrainatLewistown10-21-03TheMilwaukeeboughttheMontanaRailroadfromHarlowandLombardin1909afterleasingitsince1906.thumb.jpg.ed686288b4b5196460ac65f6dab5a53e.jpg

This was the original Jawbone RR Depot at the south end of First Avenue South in Lewistown. It was kept for years as an office space for company workers, and their wool warehouse.

677462490_LewistownJawbone2027atdepotonBrasseyStimp.thumb.jpg.6205d82ef843e3d80b9a9b2a7245d732.jpg

The same friend who sent me the above photo, also sent me this photo. It was the Lewistown 4th of July parade and had to be 1940? The new styled IHC tractors weren't out yet in July 1939. Two IH Farmall Ms and a Farmall H. That Farmall H may have even been the 1939 Farmall H our family ended up with, #FBH681, or the 181st one made.1470176515_FarmallH2Msinca1939Lewistownparade_.thumb.jpg.cfc68bad2191b61f2de80962fb0b7e77.jpg

The new Lewistown Milwaukee Depot was built at Main Street years later. 

2002016416_Milwaukeelocomotive831BobHandengineeratLewistownDepotJerryHanley_edited-1.thumb.jpg.ef08b33042ad3042d2843d2b5c1f1310.jpg

The Lewistown Milwaukee Roundhouse was south of town on upper Spring Creek.

1685574250_LewistownMilwaukeeRailroadRRRoundhouseunderconstructionTedMurray.thumb.jpg.20f96af41458b84a6a23f8d0d1021af2.jpg

And there was at least one accident at this roundhouse. Mike, you know that tall lever at the right of the engineer's seat? When you are inside and the lever is forward, you shouldn't pull open the throttle. It's not a good idea. I wasn't aware of any Mallet compound engines being used in central Montana? Maybe it was brought there for repairs?

2103473630_steamlocomotivethroughwalloftheMilwaukeeRRRoundhousenearLewistownMontanaTed.jpg.4ca88d4f5751be4be5efeaf68d29df31.jpg

Our farms used to load out grain at Joan, Montana, Population -0-! It was a facility to load grain into Milwaukee RR boxcars. Uncle Audie is dumping wheat into a Milwaukee boxcar from our Model TT Ford "dump truck"!

29570924_(16)YaegersModelTTdumptruckAudieatJoan1920simp.thumb.jpg.f4b5d77e56a7ac754f18122e2150ad16.jpg

This Milwaukee locomotive is spotting empty cars and picking up full boxcars at Joan.

I was also blessed again to get to help the engineer move the Johnson Bar rearward, open the throttle some, chug down the track in reverse. Then stop, move the Johnson bar forward and open the throttle with the help of the engineer at the Lewistown Roundhouse when I was "the big kid" in our little one room school at Glengarry. The engineer chose me to "help" him. I didn't do a heck of a lot, but it has been a memory of mine forever! This was a typical steam locomotive that passed our farm between Harlowton and Lewistown.

1086507250_LocomotiveMilwaukeeRR8148atJoanMontanalikeoneIengineeredin1954imp.thumb.jpg.40435e74e4e5adaafeaf43f9693c0829.jpg

I knew some of the old engineers personally, and they always tooted at us kids, if we were out waving at them. One afternoon, I had the Nichols & Shepard steam engine fired up and operating where it is shown in this photo, next to the Milwaukee tracks. The freight train came past and did we ever have a "whistle fest!"

407039329_1955ButtermilkCurve20-70NicholsShepardmeleftMikeTylerR.thumb.jpg.c43cd6d2f54e4d016d1fbb03c243dbd4.jpg

A Milwaukee diesel engine is photographed at the Milwaukee Depot in Lewistown. I remember seeing my first "Diesel" was in 1950 when I was about finished with my first grade year at Glengarry. I also remember in 1956 when I saw a steam locomotive pulling another steam locomotive with the side irons removed and them standing in one of the two tenders behind that cold steam locomotive. I had a feeling it would be the last steam locomotive EVER on Buttermilk Curve, and it was the last. They were heading for scrap. 

1601301625_LocomotiveMilwaukeedieselatLewistowndepot(YogoInn)_edited-1.jpg.802e7894bacd09884028a163648dae9f.jpg

This postage stamp size photo of a Milwaukee steam locomotive is passing the elevator at Sipple, Montana.

421154202_MilwaukeePassengersteamlocomotiveTrainRRRailroadpassingSippleNeillPetriecrop.jpg.33b403da0738b1982b4648b652fefe22.jpg

My big brother let me take his Brownie Junior camera to Sipple with my parents on January 9, 1953.

1350784969_BrownieJuniorlikebrotherBills10-13-16.thumb.JPG.461919acd77f7f495b2e533af4c15e58.JPG

A horrendous wind blew boxcars out of a siding at Buffalo, Montana in the middle of the night. This train was cutting in cars at Sipple. The windblown boxcars were headed downhill and gaining speed the whole way. It hit the locomotive (shown on its side) killing the engineer. The fireman survived but barely.

2050967096_LocomotivesteamerlyingonsideSippleMTJan.91953EngineerRoyGillhamdied.thumb.jpg.8511f54a60953dfbc3b039d28117713c.jpg

Off subject somewhat, but I only took three photographs ever with my brother's Brownie Jr. he bought in 1946. I only took these two other photos with it, but these photos mean a lot to me! And these are IH Tractors on a Montana Farm! Cousin Alvin, Cousin Chuck and Big Brother Bill, July 1952 "ready to go haying" photo I took.

55619456_AlvinChuckJoeBill32Reeves.thumb.jpg.ad256da1b14ef4deb6f34fd903f4d26b.jpg

And I took this photo, the third one. Dad's TD-40 dozer TracTracTor stuck in mud in 1952. It took our two other TD-40s to get the stuck one out.

23299731_Three3TD-40sstuckinBeaverCreekBillBobWilliamJoeYaeger1951_edited-2imp_edited-1.thumb.jpg.7b0a2028b04195dca16d4d1a019d92dd.jpg

And I didn't realize it as a kid, but a lot of Milwaukee freight was moved with overhead wiring. This is a photo of the new and the old.

269756331_ThenewandtheoldMilwaukeeRRElectricLocomotiveandstagecoachatMilesCityMontana.thumb.jpg.32d657caff9f48f3b591a7295bcd8068.jpg

I don't fully understand this "Little Joe" (Stalin) electric that must be pulling some neutral diesels at Deer Lodge, Montana? They have a Little Joe on display at the museum at the Montana Territorial Prison in the town of Deer Lodge. After I did learn about the electrics, it was amusing to me how when headed down the Continental Divide into Butte (America) how those engines were sending their charge back into the system to power those headed up!

1365388572_DeerLodgeMTLittleJoeSundaySeptember19th19711050MST.thumb.jpg.171be47eb60e972a81701a7e3f994022.jpg

Mike, I think that streamliner was just an advertising gimmick to promote the railroad and something to draw the public out to look at it. I don't think it ever ran or pulled a train in Montana?

1089964097_ChicagoMilwaukeeSt.PaulandPacificRailroadHiawathastreamlinersteamlocomotive.thumb.jpg.2326c1bcfd55ef197b05d9a4ec035f3d.jpg

As I remember, it wasn't a real long time after this birthday photo of my second birthday party on August 14, 1945. I think they were trying to get the Hiawatha into the "civilian mode" after WWII. I am right front. 

1187097527_GarysBirthday8-14-1945JapsSurrenderredtoo.thumb.jpg.b98535d0c9951473cf5f500501d4af81.jpg

Also August 14, 1945. VJ Day!

1270688765_JapanQuitsVJV-JDayAugust14th1945WWIIendsonmybirthday.thumb.jpg.9e67fe6100b90287c4201e97ea6f3af6.jpg

My birthday photo has a lot of meaning to me, but probably not as much as this photo taken that day in New York City?

299327470_August14th1945SailorkissingaladyVJDay.jpg.ec1e83818255706a43c7e3509f620ddd.jpg

And last but not least is this photo of our 181st IH Farmall H built after I gave her a bath a few years ago. And she is semi-retired, but still can do a day's work when needed. An IH Tractor on a Montana Farm! Gary😁

641224801_1939FarmallHAnnieafterbath8-22-13.thumb.JPG.b5f03ef9d076fc5511ba5614aab8310c.JPG

 

 

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14 minutes ago, jeeper61 said:

Do you think he can get the shimmy out with that Bear equipment?

image.png.16b855c45640d4eae4df06212c99d963.png

Don't worry it will buff right out!!😎

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Greasy coat but still wearing a bowtie, might be advertising purpose but people dressed with some style

We use a certain company occasionally for difficult boiler welding repairs, the owner is quite opinionated and dresses exceptionally well, he says my company my rules, my employees dress for their position, he said I've had good welders show up to interview in sweats, I tell them don't worry you can go back home to bed because you'll never work for me in pajamas 

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On 6/6/2022 at 2:30 PM, Absent Minded Farmer said:

Now, all that research was done some time ago & I would really like to revisit it to see what has been unearthed. I'll do some poking around this evening & see what I can come up with. Would be neat to find out that the first trainset made a run to Seattle. The thought of one of the mighty class A Atlantics gliding through the mountains, across the bridges & through the tunnels of W Montana would be an exciting one. Also a lot of straightaways to open her up on before they get that far & lots of oil to drink, as many of the steamers on the Milwaukee & other railroads were oil burners out there. A lot were under wire, too.

Mike 

Mike, I'm sure that a lot of the main line locomotives burned oil in Montana. That only makes sense. But the Harlowton station got coal from their Milwaukee RR coal mines in Roundup, Montana. Coal is all I ever remember being used on the Jawbone spur.

1825991778_TheRepublicCoalMine11908nearRoundupMontana.jpg.6ad982377c3c68781a4efa0fa7ac15ec.jpg

I also got to thinking about how in the later 1970s when the Milwaukee was going broke and went into their "Deferred Maintenance" program, basically NO maintenance. The tracks were so bad from rotten ties, I'd have been afraid to run an engine over them. Looking down this straight away where these diesels were setting in my photo, the tracks were both "snakes" on each rail, but not in coordination with each other. This photo was after a blizzard at our crossing behind that tree branch. The locomotives rammed into it and got stuck. The rear engine was one of the OLD "covered wagon" diesels that they'd brought out of retirement from somewhere, likely a back shed at Harlowton? 

306046684_MilwaukeeCoveredWagonButtermilkCurvestuckheadedtoLewistownlate1970sdeferredmaintenance.thumb.jpg.9b2b60292f33c980f1ebe4d95799443a.jpg

Our house was so close to the Milwaukee RR tracks, I instinctively lifted my legs for it to go by when in bed at night. One night I was in the tub taking a shower. The freight train was coming from Lewistown, headed to Harlowton. All of a sudden it almost felt and sounded like an earthquake. Since I had a window in the shower that looked toward the Lewistown tracks, I knew what it was. I shut off the water, grabbed the pants I'd taken off and a shirt, ran out of the house, got into my pickup, and drove up into our pasture where a bunch of the freight cars were lying on their sides. I saw one flashlight as I drove up, but were they ever glad to see me with my pickup headlights! There was a third rail on Buttermilk Curve, but that didn't phase this set of cars that rolled off of the embankment.

 

Milwaukee diesels on Buttermilk Curve headed for Lewistown 5-31-1964.jpg

The RR cars were lying in our pasture in the foreground of this photo. If I remember right, the speed limit on Buttermilk Curve was 20 or 25 MPH at this time? It had been a little faster earlier. Gary😉

Yaeger farm ranch circa 1960-3.-jpg.jpg

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2 hours ago, Howard_P said:

Absent Minded Farmer--Being a MILW guy, can you identify that first diesel that Gary posted?

That's one of the Milwaukee's own bulldogs or diesel electric motor cars. They were built in the Milwaukee Shops in the late '40s. The car body was home made & the genset & traction motors were EMD. They ran about 1000 HP & could pull 3 - 4 cars at 75 MPH, but the track they ran them on was usually rated for 50 or less. They were numbered 5900 & 5901. The 5900 stayed in WI in branch line & secondary service & the 5901 ran a secondary route in MT. The Official Railway Guide of 2/52 shows trains 117 & 118 operating to & from Harlowton, connecting with the Olympian there. Those are the only two passenger trains to grace that station at that point in history. Judging by the daylight in the pic, that's train 117 heading north or timetable west out of the station at 7:30A. It returned as 118 at 11:30P. The book does note that there is service after Great Falls to Agawam, but it's freight only by then.

I'm glad you had me pause to write this out. Did a search & someone does have the 3D plans for the bulldogs done in HO, as well as plans for the Fairbanks Morse OP-800. The Milwaukee never had one of the latter, but they will have after I get done painting the car body. ;v)

Mike

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On 6/7/2022 at 3:22 PM, Old Binder Guy said:

A potpourri of our old "Jawbone" Milwaukee RR that went past three sides of our house. I was so blessed to get to grow up there and experience the steam locomotives while they ran. This photo has been here several times, but shows Buttermilk Curve "horseshoe" loop around our homestead. It negated building a huge trestle across Beaver Creek Valley.

1422965558_YaegerRanchfromBeaverCreekHill32ReevesinLRcorneratButtermilkCurveimpcrop.thumb.jpg.e1d15bf31e70b25ddc5a00573f504903.jpg

When the Montana Railroad "Jawbone" went through the farm in July of 1903, Grandma Yaeger was "Italian-Swiss" and could speak to the construction workers. She took them cool buttermilk every afternoon, and the Jawbone named the curve, Buttermilk Curve. When the first steam locomotive and work train arrived in Lewistown on October 21, 1903, Grandma and Grandpa were there. Notice, the Jawbone had jawboned rolling stock from the Northern Pacific Railroad. And I'm sure the Northern Pacific was wanting to help out this new competitor to the Great Northern Railway?

1201127326_1stJawbonesteamlocomotivetrainatLewistown10-21-03TheMilwaukeeboughttheMontanaRailroadfromHarlowandLombardin1909afterleasingitsince1906.thumb.jpg.ed686288b4b5196460ac65f6dab5a53e.jpg

This was the original Jawbone RR Depot at the south end of First Avenue South in Lewistown. It was kept for years as an office space for company workers, and their wool warehouse.

677462490_LewistownJawbone2027atdepotonBrasseyStimp.thumb.jpg.6205d82ef843e3d80b9a9b2a7245d732.jpg

The same friend who sent me the above photo, also sent me this photo. It was the Lewistown 4th of July parade and had to be 1940? The new styled IHC tractors weren't out yet in July 1939. Two IH Farmall Ms and a Farmall H. That Farmall H may have even been the 1939 Farmall H our family ended up with, #FBH681, or the 181st one made.1470176515_FarmallH2Msinca1939Lewistownparade_.thumb.jpg.cfc68bad2191b61f2de80962fb0b7e77.jpg

The new Lewistown Milwaukee Depot was built at Main Street years later. 

2002016416_Milwaukeelocomotive831BobHandengineeratLewistownDepotJerryHanley_edited-1.thumb.jpg.ef08b33042ad3042d2843d2b5c1f1310.jpg

The Lewistown Milwaukee Roundhouse was south of town on upper Spring Creek.

1685574250_LewistownMilwaukeeRailroadRRRoundhouseunderconstructionTedMurray.thumb.jpg.20f96af41458b84a6a23f8d0d1021af2.jpg

And there was at least one accident at this roundhouse. Mike, you know that tall lever at the right of the engineer's seat? When you are inside and the lever is forward, you shouldn't pull open the throttle. It's not a good idea. I wasn't aware of any Mallet compound engines being used in central Montana? Maybe it was brought there for repairs?

2103473630_steamlocomotivethroughwalloftheMilwaukeeRRRoundhousenearLewistownMontanaTed.jpg.4ca88d4f5751be4be5efeaf68d29df31.jpg

Our farms used to load out grain at Joan, Montana, Population -0-! It was a facility to load grain into Milwaukee RR boxcars. Uncle Audie is dumping wheat into a Milwaukee boxcar from our Model TT Ford "dump truck"!

29570924_(16)YaegersModelTTdumptruckAudieatJoan1920simp.thumb.jpg.f4b5d77e56a7ac754f18122e2150ad16.jpg

This Milwaukee locomotive is spotting empty cars and picking up full boxcars at Joan.

I was also blessed again to get to help the engineer move the Johnson Bar rearward, open the throttle some, chug down the track in reverse. Then stop, move the Johnson bar forward and open the throttle with the help of the engineer at the Lewistown Roundhouse when I was "the big kid" in our little one room school at Glengarry. The engineer chose me to "help" him. I didn't do a heck of a lot, but it has been a memory of mine forever! This was a typical steam locomotive that passed our farm between Harlowton and Lewistown.

1086507250_LocomotiveMilwaukeeRR8148atJoanMontanalikeoneIengineeredin1954imp.thumb.jpg.40435e74e4e5adaafeaf43f9693c0829.jpg

I knew some of the old engineers personally, and they always tooted at us kids, if we were out waving at them. One afternoon, I had the Nichols & Shepard steam engine fired up and operating where it is shown in this photo, next to the Milwaukee tracks. The freight train came past and did we ever have a "whistle fest!"

407039329_1955ButtermilkCurve20-70NicholsShepardmeleftMikeTylerR.thumb.jpg.c43cd6d2f54e4d016d1fbb03c243dbd4.jpg

A Milwaukee diesel engine is photographed at the Milwaukee Depot in Lewistown. I remember seeing my first "Diesel" was in 1950 when I was about finished with my first grade year at Glengarry. I also remember in 1956 when I saw a steam locomotive pulling another steam locomotive with the side irons removed and them standing in one of the two tenders behind that cold steam locomotive. I had a feeling it would be the last steam locomotive EVER on Buttermilk Curve, and it was the last. They were heading for scrap. 

1601301625_LocomotiveMilwaukeedieselatLewistowndepot(YogoInn)_edited-1.jpg.802e7894bacd09884028a163648dae9f.jpg

This postage stamp size photo of a Milwaukee steam locomotive is passing the elevator at Sipple, Montana.

421154202_MilwaukeePassengersteamlocomotiveTrainRRRailroadpassingSippleNeillPetriecrop.jpg.33b403da0738b1982b4648b652fefe22.jpg

My big brother let me take his Brownie Junior camera to Sipple with my parents on January 9, 1953.

1350784969_BrownieJuniorlikebrotherBills10-13-16.thumb.JPG.461919acd77f7f495b2e533af4c15e58.JPG

A horrendous wind blew boxcars out of a siding at Buffalo, Montana in the middle of the night. This train was cutting in cars at Sipple. The windblown boxcars were headed downhill and gaining speed the whole way. It hit the locomotive (shown on its side) killing the engineer. The fireman survived but barely.

2050967096_LocomotivesteamerlyingonsideSippleMTJan.91953EngineerRoyGillhamdied.thumb.jpg.8511f54a60953dfbc3b039d28117713c.jpg

Off subject somewhat, but I only took three photographs ever with my brother's Brownie Jr. he bought in 1946. I only took these two other photos with it, but these photos mean a lot to me! And these are IH Tractors on a Montana Farm! Cousin Alvin, Cousin Chuck and Big Brother Bill, July 1952 "ready to go haying" photo I took.

55619456_AlvinChuckJoeBill32Reeves.thumb.jpg.ad256da1b14ef4deb6f34fd903f4d26b.jpg

And I took this photo, the third one. Dad's TD-40 dozer TracTracTor stuck in mud in 1952. It took our two other TD-40s to get the stuck one out.

23299731_Three3TD-40sstuckinBeaverCreekBillBobWilliamJoeYaeger1951_edited-2imp_edited-1.thumb.jpg.7b0a2028b04195dca16d4d1a019d92dd.jpg

And I didn't realize it as a kid, but a lot of Milwaukee freight was moved with overhead wiring. This is a photo of the new and the old.

269756331_ThenewandtheoldMilwaukeeRRElectricLocomotiveandstagecoachatMilesCityMontana.thumb.jpg.32d657caff9f48f3b591a7295bcd8068.jpg

I don't fully understand this "Little Joe" (Stalin) electric that must be pulling some neutral diesels at Deer Lodge, Montana? They have a Little Joe on display at the museum at the Montana Territorial Prison in the town of Deer Lodge. After I did learn about the electrics, it was amusing to me how when headed down the Continental Divide into Butte (America) how those engines were sending their charge back into the system to power those headed up!

1365388572_DeerLodgeMTLittleJoeSundaySeptember19th19711050MST.thumb.jpg.171be47eb60e972a81701a7e3f994022.jpg

Mike, I think that streamliner was just an advertising gimmick to promote the railroad and something to draw the public out to look at it. I don't think it ever ran or pulled a train in Montana?

1089964097_ChicagoMilwaukeeSt.PaulandPacificRailroadHiawathastreamlinersteamlocomotive.thumb.jpg.2326c1bcfd55ef197b05d9a4ec035f3d.jpg

As I remember, it wasn't a real long time after this birthday photo of my second birthday party on August 14, 1945. I think they were trying to get the Hiawatha into the "civilian mode" after WWII. I am right front. 

1187097527_GarysBirthday8-14-1945JapsSurrenderredtoo.thumb.jpg.b98535d0c9951473cf5f500501d4af81.jpg

Also August 14, 1945. VJ Day!

1270688765_JapanQuitsVJV-JDayAugust14th1945WWIIendsonmybirthday.thumb.jpg.9e67fe6100b90287c4201e97ea6f3af6.jpg

My birthday photo has a lot of meaning to me, but probably not as much as this photo taken that day in New York City?

299327470_August14th1945SailorkissingaladyVJDay.jpg.ec1e83818255706a43c7e3509f620ddd.jpg

And last but not least is this photo of our 181st IH Farmall H built after I gave her a bath a few years ago. And she is semi-retired, but still can do a day's work when needed. An IH Tractor on a Montana Farm! Gary😁

641224801_1939FarmallHAnnieafterbath8-22-13.thumb.JPG.b5f03ef9d076fc5511ba5614aab8310c.JPG

 

 

Don't like to make this brief, but the day got away on me.

That's really neat that you lived out by the old Jawbone line. Gorgeous scenery in that neck of the woods. The Mallet sticking out of the roundhouse in Lewiston made me think it must have been on a Monday. The book I have called Milwaukee Road Steam In The West edited by Thos. E Burg contains what little I know about the great articulateds. Seems they ran them system wide, even on the branch line up to Bellingham in WA. So it is possible they were used on the Jawbone. The oil fired ones were used in the unelectrified gap between Avery & Othello & going by your info, the coal burners could have plied the Jawbone.

The Joe at Deer Lodge was essentially a helper over the mountains. That pic would have been taken in the late '60s, early '70s with that many diesels on the train. They were added on at Harlowton & cut off at the end of wire in Avery. The train made the journey through the gap to Othello & continued on it's way to Seattle or Tacoma with another electric helper. There were times, so I heard, when the Joe(s) were cut off, the crew changed & it was all done on the fly. Anything to save a minute! One thing I would like to add is the long haul 1st class passenger trains saw both steam & diesel run through electrified territory without adding any of the electrics. It was done with the S2 & S3 Northerns, the N2 & N3 Mallets & then the Erie Builts from Fairbanks Morse were the first diesels. In the twilight years of electric service, the crack transcon freights Thunderhawk & XL Special would have passed through without a power change also.

So glad you included a picture of one of the Milwaukee's Quill motors (above the Little Joe). They don't look like much, but they could drag a Mallet kicking & screeching with little effort. I also think it's very cool that the electrics could put juice back into the wire going down grade. In terms of fuel, they essentially ran for pennies, due to the fact that most of the electricity was generated by white coal.... or snow as most of us call it. :v)

Oh, before I forget again, the camera you have pictured is a Baby Brownie Special. If it didn't have the viewfinder, it'd just be a Baby Brownie. That should be a 127 camera. If so & you wish to use it, that film is still available through several sources on the 'net. Fresh, of course.

I shall return for more.... hopefully tomorrow.

Mike

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Don't know if you've seen this video or not, but I think it kid of fits in with the theme here. It is a really nice snippet of life on the Milwaukee Road's Lines West. It is a touch long, but well worth the view, in my opinion. That and..... Holy canola!! It's in color!!

Enjoy!!

Mike

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