Jump to content

IH Tractors on Montana Farm


Old Binder Guy

Recommended Posts

3 hours ago, hardtail said:

Glory hole? 🙄

Doubtfull   Hardtail..

...more like weighing up his  chances.......

...and thanks for that  @MacAR.....it was a total puzzle for me...figured the old flint lock, though....

Mike

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not the expert on gas Cats, but not big enough to be a 60, which about only leaves a 30 with the mounts for a big round fuel tank. Because even back in there time they where known to like gas lots of it.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the D6 drawing Gary. Those I know about, sometime I think to much. Other times they still fool me. But I have warn a seat or to out on several. A lot of that time on the side of a hill like the Swiss haying pictures.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 hours ago, mike newman said:

total puzzle for me

Here's a bit of reading on it, Mike: https://www.historicalfirearms.info/post/175587471714/spencer-roper-pump-action-shotgun-the-slide-or

Seems like an interesting design, and was invented by Christian Spencer of Spencer rifle fame in partnership with Sylvester Roper, inventor of the Roper revolving shotgun. The 1893 Winchester (a John Browning baby) essentially killed it. Interestingly enough, it was available in 10 gauge, where it's competitors were mainly offered in 12 gauge. 

In other news, I was going through some of my Grandad's old photos and came across one of what appears to be a Cat crawler pulling a combine in Douglas County, Washington. Will try to post a photo of it tonight if I can, perhaps you fellers can ID the old Cat. Lord knows I can't!

Mac

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well as promised, here's a couple pictures of days past. The Old Man is punching header, and Uncle Bud is skinning the cat. Other than that I've not got a clue about the Cat, combine, or truck.

Mac

20220525_215657.thumb.jpg.f0f9a95ef22d424109a142c1e4d8cf18.jpg20220525_215715.thumb.jpg.5631e387a57d3964c36843edbe35ce55.jpg20220525_215706.thumb.jpg.b04e063f0ef0c2b4b49cc96efc461320.jpg20220525_215740.thumb.jpg.63d69905fcefc6c968179e5cc62ad458.jpg

  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, mike newman said:

looks a bit like a TD40

I zoomed in, and I think I can make out McCormick Deering across the radiator. Not 100% sure, though. I wonder, is the cab a homemade job or aftermarket? Either way, it'd have been roasting in there in July I imagine! 

Best I can remember, grandad said that was around 1946/7/8 near Waterville in Douglas County, Washington. The old man that owned the farm was German, but I've forgotten his name. Said he had racks and racks of harnesses from when they used to pull the combines with horses. Lots of Arkies went out to Washington to work back then; I still have a lot of kin around Wenatchee for that matter. Just no money to be made around here. 

Mac

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The shape of the radiator is wrong for Cat or AC so that leads me to think the IH TD 35 or 40. Cab is most likely home built.

Yes lots of horses to pull a combine on the hills. Somewhere in the pages and pages of this thread there are some real nice picture of horse pulled combines. The earliest combines where powered by a ground drive bull wheel rather than engines. So 30 to 40 horses where used to pull one combine. After engines powered the thrashing only 20 some horses where needed.

 

My grandpa bought a Cat diesel 35 in 1934 to pull his combine. I am sure he would of bought less horsepower except the combine needed that much tractor in front of it. To pay for that much tractor he took all manor of heavy tillage jobs, will to run 24 hours a day. A home made cab was added to help keep warm at night. My dad was the night time operator. Being a horse lover, dad never had a tractor with working lights in my time and never anything good to say about the old wooden cab in grandpa's barn. Having run a modern combine a few hours with the AC broke a cab without AC is BAD. 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The crawler is a IH td-40 with a factory cab. If it was a td-35 you would see the intake valve housing for the gas start system sticking through the hood. The td-40 had enough room under the hood so they don't stick through. The cab was an option but you don't see to many around. I have one just like it on a td-35. 

  • Like 4
  • Thanks 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

McCormick 40, You are so right. It is a wide gauge TD-40 McCormick-Deering TracTracTor. They had a curved top radiator. The TD-35s are pretty flat. That IS a factory cab. The early ones. Dad bought a used TD-40 with a later factory metal cab. He didn't like the cab and took it off. I wish that cab still existed, but it doesn't. That combined harvester is also a McCormick Deering. The weights behind the header and the air breather on the engine seals that!

Thanks so much for posting those pictures, MacAR! I love that type of old farm machinery. That TD-40 would actually be an IH Tractor on an Arkansas Farm!

I'm posting a photo of the International TD-40 TracTracTor Industrial wide gauge crawler we had, here moving a house for uncle Frank. The International is newer than the McCormick-Deering, but the radiator emblem was the only difference. The later ones did have later diesel pumps, but I'm not positive they weren't replacement pumps, as used on a TD-14. The TD-40 was a smaller tractor, but had the bore and stroke of the later TD-14, so they had a lot of "get up and go!" This one is an IH Tractor on a Montana Farm

PS: I've seen these crawlers with a window screen type of screen on the radiators. Stubble and chaff were unkind to radiators without a screen.

948490836_TD-40olsidmovingFrankyaegershouse.jpg.480cd38a197dac7d85d0512587cf5bdb.jpg

This is the TD-40 McCormick-Deering TracTracTor I kept out of the four of them we had. It is still an IH Tractor on a Montana Farm.

480424445_TD-40TracTracTorpulled15hpCasetowindbreak4-30-15.thumb.JPG.3235f6e46ae8ca094ba906d3a4497cc9.JPG

A guy needs his "Corn Flakes" to crank one of these. We only had one that had an electrical system and starter. The other three were cranking type.  Gary😉

1272759849_TD-40TracTracTormecrankingBW9-25-14LarryH.thumb.jpg.a622343ed884232a178d4a70cd2f8094.jpg

 

  • Like 7
Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 hours ago, Old Binder Guy said:

That TD-40 would actually be an IH Tractor on an Arkansas Farm!

Boy, I wish it was! That photo was taken somewhere in Douglas County Washington in the late 40's. A lot of my family went out there to work in the wheat harvest since there wasn't any money to be made around here after the war. Farming in the Ozarks at that time was mostly a horse or mule proposition, corn was grown to feed livestock, and cotton was about 30 cents a pound. Hard to make a living like that. So, my ancestors went in search of greener pastures. For whatever reason, they wound up around Wenatchee picking fruit, working hops in Moxee City, and in the wheat up in Waterville. They'd go out there in the spring and come home around October, work their farms through the winter, and then go back again. Sometimes they'd stay permanently, like my grandfathers brother. He wound up driving a school bus for East Wenatchee School district for 40 years, and his wife was a cook and custodian. When I was younger, we'd go visit around apple picking time. It was a lot of fun, and very interesting up there. Good steelhead fishing on the Columbia, too. I'd like to go back again sometime, but given the current attitude up there, I think I'll stay in my hills for now. 

Mac

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Professor--

Do you still have the steel wheel house moving wagon??

Used to be common to see houses being moved-----don't remember seeing one being moved since I moved Wrangler's barn in place--coming up 20yrs ago????

It was just a two room cypress tenant cabin----not near the size of Uncle Frank's house.

 

Good looking wagon.

 

DD

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Back in 2009 we still had a house mover semi local. Picked up the 70 x 70 one room school house moved it 20 to 40 feet ahead so a new foundation could be built, and set it back on the new foundation for less than $10,000 as I remember.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

They had a company move this historic building in the 80's just before I started working for the college, company said it was the heaviest building they ever moved, they tried at first and no go, then they emptied 6 semi trailers of books out of it, used bar soap to slide and every morning the hydraulic Jack's would have bottomed out, sorry I can't recall any IH from that job or MontanaAugustana-768x768.thumb.jpg.a2067a235b8aff675119cb9859684ad7.jpg

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 hours ago, Delta Dirt said:

Professor--

Do you still have the steel wheel house moving wagon??

Used to be common to see houses being moved-----don't remember seeing one being moved since I moved Wrangler's barn in place--coming up 20yrs ago????

It was just a two room cypress tenant cabin----not near the size of Uncle Frank's house.

 

Good looking wagon.

 

DD

Anson, Sadly when I left the farm, they were up in the "treasure (junk) pile" where the Reeves steam engine set for about 15 years. The two big "sticks" were there too. If I had had my head on at the time I left, they probably wouldn't have been left there. There were so many things that shouldn't have been left in that junk pile. But I was lucky to be able to carry my suitcase to the pickup and say goodbye. I think the family that owns the place now have cleaned that junk pile up. That junk pile with the Reeves steam engine still in it is in the lower right hand corner, with Buttermilk Curve very obvious. This photo was taken in 1952 and we still had only steam locomotives pulling trains on the curve too. Glengarry, where I went to the one room school for 8 years is on the bench above our house.  Gary🤨

541908900_3YaegerRanchfromBeaverCreekHill32ReevesinLowerRightcorneratRRButtermilkCurve.thumb.jpg.1557b50b08255bb7f0cfb0087a383b6d.jpg

PS: Let's not forget those who gave all for the freedom we have in this country this weekend and Monday.

454636043_AmilitarycemeteryonMemorialDayDecorationheadstoneswithUSflags.thumb.jpg.3b05ff853143771b00b83e0bfa256fb9.jpg

  • Like 9
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the Memorial Day reminder Gary.  Let's remember the boys that gave it all------along with  the ones that suffered major wounds and amputations.

There were a little over 100 in our USMC Reserve unit.  Never was called for active duty----but we were ready.

One night the C/O called all members up to the big class room on the double.  We were just getting seated when Capt Ward walked in holding up a telegram saying: "men---I hate to tell you this; but we are activated.

It was hot-----in the back of the room standing in the door; we immediately heard a huge k-flopp.

Barfield had fainted and hit the concrete floor like a sack of wet potatoes.

Activation and service in Viet Nam was definitely on everybody's mind.

Turned out it was just a training drill and a sobering thought for everyone.

 

DD

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

A friend of mine is a former Marine that went Viet Nam on two different tours of duty. He told me once "We weren't heroes, just a bunch of dumb kids that did what we had to do to keep ourselves and our buddies alive. The real heroes were the one that sacrificed to keep the rest of us alive."  He came home to Plainview, Texas and became a firefighter. A few years later he was one of the first class of EMT's to graduate from Texas Tech Med School. We rode many miles on motorcycles later. Couple years ago his wife inherited a ranch not too far from here. (part of it borders the 6666's ranch)

No photo description available.

  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I spend the afternoon at the Best of the West show Friday. They did nice Remembrance of the Fallen at noon. Then Confederate Air Force then made a few passes down low right near the crowd.

 

They had the Holt steamer running in the parade. Doing to much talking with a new friend from Canada/Australia to tell you what all they drove past us. My friend was very impressed that a number of very young kids piloted 100 year old tractor.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My Grandfather was a WW2 Veteran. He never saw action but was stationed in Germany at the end of the war. He spoke very little of his time there but would answer questions when asked. He passed a few years ago and I miss his quiet smile very much. He would set a pace and work people 1/4 his age into the dirt because he never sped up or slowed down. 
In town around our town square the VFW puts up flags every year. It is quite the spectacle when lit up and normally has local news crews from an hour away reporting around the holiday. What many don’t realize is that each of the 400+ flags are donated by a family. The first year after you donate a flag for your loved one you are allowed to erect that flag in a certain place up front along with the other new additions. Yesterday we erected one for my Grandfather. My Father is in the center of the pic, brother at left, and myself at right. The bottom one is a pic I snapped a couple years ago showing more. Many people show up to set this up and the utmost care is taken by kids and adults alike to see that no flag touches the ground.  We helped set them all up yesterday morning before this pic was taken.
 

A BIG Thank You to ALL who have served. I understand that Memorial Day is for the fallen and passed but you still deserve the same thanks. 🇺🇸

FC0AE10C-76B6-4301-A866-C3BA4CEA56A6.jpeg

657ED9FE-13FA-475D-A61E-B1BC773EB256.jpeg

  • Like 10
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for your post and flag story, Todd! What a great flag event you have there.

I didn't go to Vietnam either Anson. I was in the Montana Army National Guard then and they had to deploy the whole 163rd Armored Cavalry Regiment here before I'd had to go. If We'd been called up, I would have gone. Sadly, I have a couple of dear friends names from Lewistown on the Vietnam Wall.

I'm just throwing some pictures on here for the heck of it. An IHC Mogul (30-60?) stack threshing.

1507323532_IHCMogultractorstackthreshingebay.jpg.40ac8a3773632026fa520456d457d3d1.jpg

Two 30-60 Hart Parr "Old Reliable" kerosene tractors pulling binders in a grain field in Colorado. They're actually cutting more footage than a modern combine, I think? I think I've counted about 54 feet of cut. They may be using a little more "manpower" though? I wish I could see a little more of that old Touring Car at right.

201247835_JRWelchharvestingoutfittwo2HartParr30-60OldReliabletractorspullingbindersTouringCarBeachNorthDakotaebayIH.jpg.dc45b143970dd509f8badfc9db120e0c.jpg

This is an IHC Titan gas tractor with extension rims powering a threshing machine. They must be constructing a granary as they thresh? Maybe one of you understand what's going on here?

622035463_UnknowngastractormaybeIHCTitanthreshingebay.jpg.d3b264ea256d7bc023469aed53c21e69.jpg

This was in London, I believe? "You picked a fine time to leave me loose wheel!" I'll bet the engineer (driver?) of this steam engine said "Darn it?"

1365284237_OneofthoseOhdarnit!daysinLondonIH.jpg.de8bc6c76f1bcbc7f411861fe9e1f6c0.jpg

An IH Tractor on a Montana Farm is "Tony" our 1940 IH Farmall A in Mike's shop.

844565689_1926ModelTCoupemovedoutofwinterberthMike5-27-2022_edited-1.thumb.jpg.a1c6b0b4ca5e1ac4647a3787347f3e7c.jpg

And "Tony" the IH Tractor on a Montana Farm is beside the hole left by Mike moving the 1926 Model T Coupe out of its winter berth.

1654982903_1926ModelTmovedoutofwinterberthMike5-27-2022.thumb.jpg.36d7cc19f3687e123bd300077128d19e.jpg

(I did hang this sign on the door of the machine room for Mike's friends to see if they come to visit his shop.)

1367150758_NotaJunkCollectoranInteriorDecorator.thumb.jpg.b57425b644e74e542622a575a4f41bd4.jpg

It's always exciting to see the Model T ready to head out the door of the shop. Mike moved it for his elderly Pop. And I don't mind not getting to drive it for a few days yet. It IS raining this morning and we're supposed to get lots of rain (and snow) for the next several days. What a blessing this rain is.

1379083052_1926ModelTFordmovedupintotheshopbayMike5-27-2022.thumb.jpg.b25c9e33dcd34f0ec451b3c035efd2a7.jpg

1885586437_1926ModelTCoupeintheshopbayMike5-27-2022.thumb.jpg.3d91984de3af8dc2a8cb1bd222c65db2.jpg

1255109749_1926ModelTCoupemovedupintotheshopbayMike5-27-2022.thumb.jpg.ed1be90a51d6b68d427e2836bd52db39.jpg

We are likely the driest part of Montana. Even last year's scorched earth part of eastern Montana got in on much of that North Dakota snow from about a month ago. Maybe we won't see the DC-10 fire bomber as early this year? We may even get to plant oats and thresh for my birthday? Threshing in 2019 at Silver Creek. (Another IH Tractor on a Montana Farm!)

850946439_ThreshingatSilverCreek15hpCaseAndyMichael8-24-19.thumb.jpg.86502d2d0da6c10b41e687e341159711.jpg

The Fire Bombers use Helena as a western Montana "filling station" for slurry. Even central Lewistown fires refill here. There is a filling station in eastern Montana too. I forget where. 

93017237_FireretardantjetbombersatHelenaairportDC-10.thumb.jpg.2b1130ad8cde8a97ed7f4b7223340bcf.jpg

This was the DC-10 a few years ago dropping retardant on a lightening fire about a mile or two from our apartment. 

813901674_DC-10firebomberdroppingslurryonSouthHillsHelenafire8-24-17.thumb.jpg.600fbc25566b55bcef8ec51a7fdf2641.jpg

I didn't put this on so much for us farm and tractor kids on Red Power. It's more for our city cousins that live near salt water. Gary 😊

1513290670_YourdayatthebeachbroughttobytheirdayattheOmahabeacheadD-DayJune61944.thumb.jpg.b8aa8d297445060b9c39f08d15b1eeea.jpg

And other beaches too. US Marines on the beach at Iwo Jima.

703615056_USMarinesonthebeachofIwoJimaIslandwithmountSerabachiinthedistanceMemorialDay.jpg.d3c1c8ce6ff3c7b612c3afbb6fd13568.jpg

 

  • Like 6
  • Thanks 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Was perusing the "interweb" yesterday and found this pic. The only information about it said "International F series truck with cotton bales. 1921". ls that what that particular model was called?  F series? Regardless, looks like he's been in some mud somewhere.

image.png.283ca57124ab860f9c3b7e16604f8e2b.png

  • Like 4
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sure looks like an F. Friend of mine in PA has a original that may show up at RPRU if the stars are in alignment.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/29/2022 at 11:53 PM, Sledgehammer said:

My Grandfather was a WW2 Veteran. He never saw action but was stationed in Germany at the end of the war. He spoke very little of his time there but would answer questions when asked. He passed a few years ago and I miss his quiet smile very much. He would set a pace and work people 1/4 his age into the dirt because he never sped up or slowed down. 
In town around our town square the VFW puts up flags every year. It is quite the spectacle when lit up and normally has local news crews from an hour away reporting around the holiday. What many don’t realize is that each of the 400+ flags are donated by a family. The first year after you donate a flag for your loved one you are allowed to erect that flag in a certain place up front along with the other new additions. Yesterday we erected one for my Grandfather. My Father is in the center of the pic, brother at left, and myself at right. The bottom one is a pic I snapped a couple years ago showing more. Many people show up to set this up and the utmost care is taken by kids and adults alike to see that no flag touches the ground.  We helped set them all up yesterday morning before this pic was taken.
 

A BIG Thank You to ALL who have served. I understand that Memorial Day is for the fallen and passed but you still deserve the same thanks. 🇺🇸

FC0AE10C-76B6-4301-A866-C3BA4CEA56A6.jpeg

657ED9FE-13FA-475D-A61E-B1BC773EB256.jpeg

.......Todd.....my Dad's experiences  , as a Pilot  in the (British ) Royal Air Force, flying Mosquito's  doing  'PR" (Photographic  Reconnaissance)  based in India  /    Burma   and Cocos Island...working closely with British and American  Intelligence  re the Japanese threat  etc...left an indelible impression on me  , re the ''American Imput"  into this conflict....In particular how there was never enough food / supplies etc for the two Squadrons    RAF681  and 684..whilst in India..  due to the sheer logistics of supply chains etc  etc....Thus the American  Navel Base in"Trincomalee', Ceylon..provided those two British Squadrons   , (''unofficially  !!!)..with a few extra  supplies....

Thus , although its many years since   (57 )  since Dad was taken out....I inherited  his "respect ' for   America...and have ttravelled many miles around your great country..(for a non-resident    visitor..)...and one of the enduring memories , for me , is the Patriotism  that is so evident ...where ever you go....Great to  see

Long may it last !!

Mike

  • Like 5
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...